Google Stadia’s ‘State Share’ will change how a game’s best moments are shared

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Google Stadia’s ‘State Share’ will change how a game’s best moments are shared

Google’s newly announced Stadia platform will let game developers and players share save points via the cloud. According to the presentation, so-called State Share is more than a save file. It’s a transferable, encoded representation of the given state of a game. It will change how key moments in games are referenced and shared between users.

On hand to make the announcement was Dylan Cuthbert, president and managing director of Q-Games, makers of the PixelJunk series and Nom Nom Galaxy.

Google’s Stadia promises huge innovations for multiplayer gaming

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Google’s Stadia promises huge innovations for multiplayer gaming

Google announced a new streaming platform for gaming during its GDC keynote today. Called Stadia, the new platform is cloud-based instead of being focused on a single, local console, which will also allow Google to try new things in the world of multiplayer gaming while also reportedly wiping out the threats of cheats and hacks.

“When we designed Stadia, our goal was to solve many of the pain points that we had heard about from developers,” Google vice president Phil Harrison stated. “Particularly those related to multiplayer. In traditional platforms, the client and server are connect by the unpredictable internet, and therefore the multiplayer experience is limited by the client with the slowest or poorest internet connection.”

Doom Eternal will be playable on Google’s Stadia

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Doom Eternal will be playable on Google’s Stadia

Doom Eternal, the sequel to the 2016 series reboot, is coming to Google’s new Stadia platform, developer id Software announced at Google’s GDC event on Tuesday.

During the announcement, id executive producer Marty Stratton explained that the game would run on Stadia at 4k resolution at 60 fps with HDR support and it will all run on a single Stadia GPU. As with other Stadia games, Doom Eternal will be playable on all Stadia compatible devices including traditional desktops and laptops, as well as phones, tablets, and televisions. The game will also be compatible with Google’s Stadia controller as well.

Doom Eternal will be playable on Google Stadia

about X hours ago from
Doom Eternal will be playable on Google Stadia

Doom Eternal, the sequel to the 2016 series reboot, is coming to Google’s new Stadia platform, developer id Software announced at Google’s GDC event on Tuesday.

During the announcement, id executive producer Marty Stratton explained that the game would run on Stadia in 4K resolution at 60 frames per second with HDR support — all on a single Stadia GPU. As with other Stadia games, Doom Eternal will be playable on all Stadia-compatible devices including traditional desktops and laptops, as well as smartphones, tablets, and televisions. The game will also be compatible with Google’s Stadia controller.

Google’s Stadia will let you jump into a game in seconds straight from YouTube

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Google’s Stadia will let you jump into a game in seconds straight from YouTube

Google’s Game Developers Conference keynote today pulled the curtain back on Stadia, a service that allows anyone to play new video games by streaming them over the internet. According to Google CEO Sundar Pichai, the ambition was to “build a gaming platform for everyone,” which means no barriers — including hardware.

The idea is wild: Google Vice President Phil Harrison took to the stage and showed how players will be able to load up a YouTube trailer. At the end of an official trailer, you might see a button that says “Play Now,” and pressing it will launch you straight into whatever game you were watching within seconds. You’ll be able to play straight from the browser itself. According to Google, the YouTube integration will also allow for real-time streaming at 4K and 60 frames-per-second, eventually allowing for 120 FPS at 8k.

To show it off, Harrison said they intentionally bought the lowest-end PC possible — meaning that as long as you have an internet connection, you’ll be able to play modern video games without hitches. Stadia will reportedly work on nearly anything from phones to tablets, and Chromebooks.

Here’s your first look at Google’s gaming controller

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Here’s your first look at Google’s gaming controller

Google’s foray into the gaming world, Google Stadia, depends on an ambitious plan to let nearly any ordinary device stream modern video games. To go along with this Stadia announcement, Google also revealed a specialized controller at the Game Developers Conference this year that will help players direct their streaming experiences. Here’s what you can expect.

The controller, while fancy, is not actually necessary to enjoy Google’s gaming experience — players can also hook up whatever peripheral they’d like via USB or Bluetooth. However, the Google controller will let players to perform stream-specific tasks with the touch of a button, making it a smart choice of anyone picking up Stadia. For example, you’ll be able to press a button to receive help from the developers. There’s also a button that allows for easy capture and sharing with friends. Otherwise, the controller is what you’d expect from a device of this kind: there’s a D-pad, joysticks, face buttons, and shoulder buttons. The controller will connect to the cloud via Wi-Fi.

Apex Legends’ season 1 patch adjusts the game’s biggest hitboxes

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Apex Legends’ season 1 patch adjusts the game’s biggest hitboxes

Apex Legends’ first season has begun, and alongside the battle pass and a new character, there’s also a patch that fixes a few bugs.

The main goal of this patch, according to developer Respawn Entertainment, was to better balance the Legends, specifically to make up for the characters’ various hitbox sizes. Pathfinder, Gibraltar, and Caustic all got smaller hitboxes in the patch which should help them compete with other Legends a little easier.

Google Stadia is the new gaming platform from Google

about X hours ago from
Google Stadia is the new gaming platform from Google

Google announced Stadia, a new cloud-based gaming platform, at its GDC 2019 keynote this morning. It’s a major move for Google into the video game business, which is increasingly building toward streaming as a solution.

Stadia is not a dedicated console or set-top box. The platform will be accessible on a variety of platforms: browsers, computers, TVs, and mobile devices. Stadia will be powered by Google’s worldwide data centers, which live in more than 200 countries and territories, streamed over hundreds of millions of miles of fiber optic cable, Pichai said.

Google’s gaming service and hardware announcement, keynote, and details

about X hours ago from
Google’s gaming service and hardware announcement, keynote, and details

Today at the 2019 Game Developers Conference, Google will announce a brand new gaming-related project. Details from the keynote are incoming; we’ll update this storystream as Google reveals more information.

Today’s keynote will offer what Google calls its “vision for the future of gaming.” While more details are still to be seen, we do know that Google unveiled Project Stream last year, a tech demo that made it possible to stream Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed Odyssey through a Google Chrome browser.

Stadia: Google’s gaming service and hardware announcement, keynote, and details

about X hours ago from
Stadia: Google’s gaming service and hardware announcement, keynote, and details

Today at the 2019 Game Developers Conference, Google will announce a brand new gaming-related project. Details from the keynote are incoming; we’ll update this storystream as Google reveals more information.

Today’s keynote will offer what Google calls its “vision for the future of gaming.” While more details are still to be seen, we do know that Google unveiled Project Stream last year, a tech demo that made it possible to stream Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed Odyssey through a Google Chrome browser.