Atari revives Missile Command with ‘modern take’ for mobile

about X hours ago from
Atari revives Missile Command with ‘modern take’ for mobile

Atari is reviving Missile Command with a new game that the company calls “a modern take” on the arcade classic for mobile devices. The launch of the game, called Missile Command: Recharged, coincides with this year’s 40th anniversary of the 1980 original.

Missile Command: Recharged maintains the same perspective of the original game, in which missile silos battle incoming rockets to protect civilian structures. Recharged uses a neon-colored visual design, a la classic arcade game re-imaginings like Pac Man Championship Edition and Space Invaders Extreme. Gameplay has been remixed, with power-ups, an upgrade system, and an augmented reality mode that projects gameplay onto a “virtual arcade cabinet.”

Fan beats Pokémon game without taking any damage

about X hours ago from
Fan beats Pokémon game without taking any damage

Even if you don’t find Pokémon games to be particularly challenging, you’re still probably going to incur damage at some point. But one intrepid fan decided to see what would happen if he went through a game without ever getting hit.

Smallant1 used Pokémon Platinum for his no-damage run because he grew up with it, and has likely put in the most time in that installment than any other one. That familiarity would be crucial, because finishing the challenge requires intimate knowledge of what creatures all the trainers have, and the moves those monsters come paired with.

Indie developers are struggling after GDC’s cancellation, but relief funds can help

about X hours ago from
Indie developers are struggling after GDC’s cancellation, but relief funds can help

As major game companies began dropping out of the Game Developers Conference, originally scheduled for mid-March in San Francisco, attendees began to worry about the reality of the event — whether it would actually happen as the novel coronavirus spreads around the globe. On Friday, organizers confirmed the annual convention’s fate: GDC has been postponed until summer over concerns regarding the virus.

Large companies that have pulled out — like Microsoft, Sony, Epic Games, Amazon, and Activision Blizzard — will certainly be affected by the event’s postponement, but it’s independent developers that will face much of the burden. Developers without corporate backing are facing uncertainty over refunds for travel, as well as the lost opportunity in missing the event. In the wake of its postponement, however, multiple initiatives have sprung up to help developers recoup lost opportunity and funds. The GDC Relief Fund, set up by WINGS Interactive, gamedev.world, and publishers, has already raised $76,500 in donations to disperse among those in need.

Watch 10 minutes of new Half-Life: Alyx gameplay

about X hours ago from
Watch 10 minutes of new Half-Life: Alyx gameplay

Valve will release its first new Half-Life game, the virtual reality exclusive Half-Life: Alyx, on March 23, more than 12 years after the previous entry came to PC. On Monday, Valve released a trio of gameplay videos, totaling more than 10 minutes of footage, of Half-Life: Alyx in action.

Each video showcases one of the VR game’s styles of movement. There’s teleport, which lets the player leap from place to place instantly, minimizing motion sickness; continuous, a more traditional style of first-person movement that is aimed at the strongest of stomachs; and shift, a smoothly zooming transition between points.

Nvidia’s GeForce Now streaming service loses another game over licensing dispute

about X hours ago from
Nvidia’s GeForce Now streaming service loses another game over licensing dispute

On Sunday, Raphael van Lierop, founder of Hinterland Studio, announced that The Long Dark was being removed from the GeForce Now streaming service. He said Nvidia never asked for permission to include the game on its platform. When he raised the issue, he says his team was offered a new graphics card by way of apology. It’s just the latest in a series of strange licensing disputes to crop up with Nvidia’s streaming service, which exited a lengthy beta period earlier this year.

“Sorry to those who are disappointed you can no longer play #thelongdark on GeForce Now,” van Lierop tweeted. “Please take your complaints to them, not us. Devs should control where their games exist.”

Death Stranding PC release date set for June 2 — with a Half-Life crossover

about X hours ago from
Death Stranding PC release date set for June 2 — with a Half-Life crossover

Kojima Productions’ Death Stranding will be released on Windows PC via Steam and the Epic Games Store on June 2, publisher 505 Games announced on Monday. The PC edition will launch with a new photo mode, high frame-rate support, and ultra-wide monitor comparability.

Here’s the weird thing: It’s also launching with a Half-Life crossover. There’s not much information on what, exactly, that entails, save for a brief teaser in the Death Stranding PC trailer: Sam Porter Bridges, Death Stranding’s main character played by Norman Reedus, has a red steam valve on his head. Iconic, huh?

Final Fantasy 7 Remake demo out now on PS4

about X hours ago from
Final Fantasy 7 Remake demo out now on PS4

Square Enix released a playable demo of Final Fantasy 7 Remake for PlayStation 4 on Monday, giving fans a taste of the upcoming reimagining of the classic role-playing game.

The Final Fantasy 7 Remake demo is available to download from the PlayStation Store. It requires 7.5 GB of hard drive space. The demo features a playable mission from early on in the game: Cloud and Barret infiltrate the Shinra Electric Power Company to bomb a Mako reactor and must escape. Before they can flee to safety, however, they must battle the Scorpion Sentinel, an early boss fight that’s no joke.

Riot’s Valorant mashes up Rainbow Six with CS:GO for a speedy new tactical shooter

about X hours ago from
Riot’s Valorant mashes up Rainbow Six with CS:GO for a speedy new tactical shooter

When Riot Games released League of Legends back in 2009, the MOBA genre was still small, and in need of a game to come along and define just how great it could be. But when Riot announced a shooter codenamed Project A in October 2019, it was wading into deeper waters. The shooter genre is already littered with games, from the culturally dominant to smaller cult favorites.

But just like it did with League of Legends, Riot is taking bits and pieces of the best games in the genre and turning them into something that feels completely new in Valorant.

Valorant: Everything we know about Riot Games’ new shooter

about X hours ago from
Valorant: Everything we know about Riot Games’ new shooter

Riot has finally revealed its first major non-League of Legends game: Valorant. The company’s new game is a major departure from its MOBA past, and doesn’t even draw on similar strategy games like Legends of Runeterra or Teamfight Tactics. To help give you a better idea of what Riot’s new game is all about, we’re going to answer every question you might have about Valorant.

Yes, it was. Riot announced Valorant as Project A during its League of Legends 10-year anniversary stream in October. All we knew about the game then was that it was a “character-based tactical shooter.” Now we know a whole lot more, including the fact that its real name is Valorant.

FIFA 20 developers battle ongoing input lag problems with unusual test

about X hours ago from
FIFA 20 developers battle ongoing input lag problems with unusual test

FIFA 20 developers back in December promised improvements to connectivity and responsiveness for its online multiplayer modes. Friday, they announced the next stage of their work, which is a test to help them understand what’s really causing these problems.

That involves reaching out to a group of volunteer players and giving their versions of the game an on-screen button overlay (pictured above). That overlay will do two things: Show the players how their inputs are received in real time, and also let developers understand how the connection with the data center may be affecting that responsiveness. Further, EA Vancouver developers will be able to better analyze match replays to see what exactly the trouble is regarding input lag, input loss, game speed, and even freezing.