Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games are coming to Virtual Console

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Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games are coming to Virtual Console

Even more Pokémon games are on their way

Nintendo's adding three Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games to the Wii U Virtual Console this Thursday, June 23. For the first time, Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Red Rescue Team (for Game Boy Advance), Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Blue Rescue Team and Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Sky (both for Nintendo DS) will be playable on Wii U.

Nintendo didn't give a price point for the re-releases, each of which are among the earliest entries in the roguelike spinoff series. Red and Blue Rescue Team first launched stateside in 2006; Explorers of Sky followed in 2009. The games let players control a variety of Pokémon themselves as they travel through randomly generated dungeons alongside other monsters.

Nintendo's getting help from Monolith on Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

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Nintendo's getting help from Monolith on Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

But it's not the first time the Xenoblade team's worked on a Zelda

Monolith Soft, makers of the Xenoblade games, are working with Nintendo on The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. Nintendo's creative fellow Shigeru Miyamoto told Game Informer that Nintendo had enlisted help from the team on its upcoming Wii U and NX game, which made a major appearance on the E3 2016 showfloor.

Breath of Wild is set to be the biggest Zelda game to date, one that returns to the series' more non-linear roots. In what capacity Monolith Soft is helping is unknown, but the team is familiar with designing open-world games: Xenoblade Chronicles X on Wii U is set in an expansive universe. Monolith also has other Zelda games on its resume, having contributed to the divisive Skyward Sword on Wii and A Link Between Worlds for 3DS.

River City: Tokyo Rumble’s getting a physical release

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River City: Tokyo Rumble’s getting a physical release

Fans have themselves to thank

Natsume will release River City: Tokyo Rumble both physically and digitally later this year, the publisher told Polygon during E3 2016. The Kunio-kun series' first 3DS release to make it stateside is set to receive a limited-edition printing when it launches later this year, although that wasn't always the case.

"[Tokyo Rumble] was going to be digital-only," Graham Markay, Netsuke's vice president of operations, said. "You don't have to sell to retail or try to explain or try to get the physical product placed on store shelves [with online exclusive releases]. That gives you the ability to take a few more chances."

HBO releases featurette showing how last night's Game of Thrones battle was made

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HBO releases featurette showing how last night's Game of Thrones battle was made

It's 10 minutes long and worth every second

Last night, HBO aired the anticipated ninth episode of Game of Thrones' sixth season, "Battle of the Bastards." The episode had one of the biggest battles to date, and to celebrate the choreography that went into making the scene possible, the network has released a behind-the-scenes look at how it got made.

The scene, which can be seen in the video above, took more than 70 horses and hundreds of bodies to make happen. And don't let the magic of television fool you: most of it was 100% real. The video features interviews with different actors, including Kit Harington, and director Miguel Sapochnik, who will also direct the finale next week.

Ambitious crowdfunded game ReRoll abandoned, backers given little in return

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Ambitious crowdfunded game ReRoll abandoned, backers given little in return

Game project, and the company making it, vanishes overnight

ReRoll, the ambitious open-world multiplayer survival game, has been abandoned by its creators according to a post on Reddit. Montreal-based Pixyul announced via email during E3 last week that "the development of ReRoll is over." The only compensation offered to backers, some of whom paid nearly $300 for access to the game, is a key to an unrelated early access title valued at $15.

ReRoll, described as an isometric persistent online open-world survival action-RPG, was the brainchild of Julien Cuny and Louis-Pierre Pharand, both formerly of Ubisoft Montreal. The pitch, to use existing topographic and municipal data as well as civilian drones to create a digital version of the entire Earth one square-kilometer at a time, was enticing. But crowdfunding was not enough to bankroll the project. Pixyul said that, after multiple attempts at striking deals both inside and outside the games industry, it was ultimately unable to find a willing publisher.

Mighty No. 9 documentary reveals the game's early days, before production woes

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Mighty No. 9 documentary reveals the game's early days, before production woes

Watch Keiji Inafune peel back the curtain on the long-awaited Kickstarter project

Mighty No. 9 — barring any last-minute changes — will finally make it into players' hands tomorrow, June 21, and director Keiji Inafune can't wait to see their faces once they start playing. At least, that's what he said back in 2014, when the first episode of 2Player Productions' documentary series about Mighty No. 9, seen above, was filmed. The game's developer debuted the video on its Kickstarter page over the weekend as it geared up for launch, promising an early look at Mighty No. 9's protracted development.

Watching with the benefit of hindsight changes the tenor of the episode, where Infaune and the rest of the team talk excitedly about the Mega Man successor's difficulty and lead an office tour. Discussion points include Inafune's frequent requests to his much greener co-designers and his excitement to get the game out within the next year. That's a timeline it obviously missed; first slated for an April 2015 release, Mighty No. 9 was delayed three times, due to bugs and production issues.

Allison Road's publisher and developer give statements, but answer few questions, about cancellation

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Allison Road's publisher and developer give statements, but answer few questions, about cancellation

Still no word why they split, or why the project had to be shut down

The would-be publisher of Allison Road, the horror game compared to P.T., has given a statement about the project's cancellation but it sheds no light on why they split with the developers, or why the developers then shut everything down.

Speaking to VG247, Team17 made the following statement:

HBO apologizes for HBO Now not being available during Game of Thrones

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HBO apologizes for HBO Now not being available during Game of Thrones

It's not the first time, either

Last night, HBO aired one of the biggest Game of Thrones episodes ever. It was so big, that Polygon's Ben Kuchera said it made up for just about every disappointing moment that's occurred in the series over the course of the past six seasons. It was comparable to the momentous Red Wedding episode that aired during the show's third season, which saw the death of everyone's favorite character to hate, King Joffrey.

Those using cable boxes and streaming the show directly through said boxes would have been able to watch the show no problem. For those hoping to catch it using HBO's streaming service, HBO Now, luck was not on their side. HBO Now users noticed that the service was down just as Game of Thrones was starting and weren't able to access it again until a good ten minutes after the episode had finished.

Watch the creepy first teaser trailer for HBO's Westworld

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Watch the creepy first teaser trailer for HBO's Westworld

Show will premiere this fall on HBO

Before airing its most anticipated episode of Game of Thrones this season, HBO debuted the first teaser trailer for its tense and creepy new series, Westworld.

Based on a sci-fi movie from 1973 by Michael Crichton (Jurassic Park), Westworld follows a group of people in a futuristic theme park called Westworld. The show has also been described as "a dark odyssey about the dawn of artifical consciousness and the future of sin."

Sports at E3: Experimentation isn't in new games, it's in the old ones

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Sports at E3: Experimentation isn't in new games, it's in the old ones

Narrative modes and ultimate teams take the place of arcade titles and spinoffs a decade ago

A decade ago, Madden NFL still published on PC. EA Sports took a chance on a management simulation called NFL Head Coach, not only for that platform but also on consoles. It published MVP NCAA Baseball 06, still the only licensed video game for a non-revenue (i.e. not football or basketball) college sport. And, thanks largely to the persistence of an Australian who is now the CEO for all of Electronic Arts, there was Rugby 06 — developed in Canada and also launched in North America.

My question, this week, to the bosses of EA Sports' two principal studios, was as rhetorically nostalgic as it was curious: Where has the experimentation in sports video gaming gone? Or has the modern age of licensing and development, ushered in by EA itself 10 years ago, closed the door on those days forever?