Here's what happens if you're caught cheating in Pokémon Go

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Here's what happens if you're caught cheating in Pokémon Go

Those Pokémon will run away

Since the launch of Pokémon Go last week, there have been multiple reported cases of players being banned for GPS spoofing — changing their location to catch Pokémon in other cities and take over remote gyms without ever getting out of their seats. While most players using GPS spoofing and modified versions of the game are from rural areas where it's a little more desolate for budding trainers, developer Niantic Labs doesn't hold any sympathy, and has been issuing soft bans on players who decide to cheat.

According to players who have been dealt bans for using GPS spoofing hacks, once they were discovered, they were no longer able to catch Pokémon, collect items from PokéStops and couldn't battle or claim a gym. When trying to throw a PokéBall at a Pokémon in the game, players discovered the opposing Pokémon would just run away instead. Most players have used the cheating tool to flock to heavily populated areas, like New York City, where there are more Pokémon available to be caught.

Baseball club lets Pokémon Go players into stadium while the team is out of town

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Baseball club lets Pokémon Go players into stadium while the team is out of town

$5 lets them walk the field to catch any Pokémon out there

The Durham Bulls, the minor-league baseball franchise in North Carolina, have opened their empty ballpark for Pokémon Go players today while the team is out of town.

There's a good reason for it, too. The Bulls' general manager said in a statement that during the team's most recent homestand, management discovered that the Durham Bulls Athletic Park was a Pokémon Go hotspot, but that many monsters were on the field itself and out of range of players sitting in the stands.

Pokémon Go's biggest missing features

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Pokémon Go's biggest missing features

Battling your friends, fighting nearby trainers and more

Pokémon Go is predominantly a single-player experience in its current state. This looks set to change, however, according to developer Niantic Labs; trading is on its way to the iOS and Android hit.

There are other modes — many of them multiplayer — that Pokémon fans are also hoping will make it into Pokémon Go as it continues to be tweaked following its release. Follow along for a list of some of the other familiar Pokémon elements the game is currently missing out on, and keep your fingers crossed that they're bound for the game.

Pokémon Go players are using hacks, drones and cheating tools to get out of walking

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Pokémon Go players are using hacks, drones and cheating tools to get out of walking

Sure, why not?

Pokémon Go players are looking for the best ways to get out of walking around to catch Pokémonincluding paying $30 to be chauffeured around their cities. Now, players are using modified versions of the game — or simply put, hacks — and enlisting the help of drones.

During a stream on Twitch earlier this week, one Pokémon Go player introduced his audience to the Pokémon Go Cheat Tool. Essentially, the player downloaded a modified version of the side-loading APKs going around for Android that when used changed the location of where the player was to catch other interesting types of Pokémon he may not have been able to otherwise. In the stream, the player was able to catch the Pokémon without getting out of his seat, getting around one of the core concepts of the game: walking.

NPD's tracking reports to include digital sales for the first time this month

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NPD's tracking reports to include digital sales for the first time this month

Will measure sales of participating publishers full games, track DLC revenue but not make that public

The NPD Group will take the first steps in a plan to measure digital sales of video games and include the figures in its monthly reports, according to an interview with GamesIndustry.biz.

NPD is introducing a Digital Games Tracking Service that works at the point of sale in digital storefronts to track sales in the United States, broken out by SKU, the same as if the product was sold physically in a store. GamesIndustry.biz says NPD's digital measuring efforts have the support of Electronic Arts, Activision, Ubisoft, Capcom, Take-Two Interactive, Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment, Square Enix and Deep Silver. Notably, Bethesda Softworks and Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo's publishing divisions are not involved.

Pokémon Go will get trading, other features in updates

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Pokémon Go will get trading, other features in updates

A major addition for the mobile game

Pokémon Go is set to receive trading in a future update, according to Niantic Labs' CEO John Hanke. In interviews with Game Informer and Business Insider, he confirmed that adding trading to the iOS and Android game is a priority for the development team.

"It's kind of a core element," Hanke said to Business Insider of the feature, which is one of the biggest aspects of the mainline Pokémon games missing from the mobile iteration.

Sega’s obscure Rent A Hero being adapted into movie

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Sega’s obscure Rent A Hero being adapted into movie

Japan-only action-RPG pitched as “Uber for superheroes” comedy flick

Sega’s movie and television production company is developing a film based on the game maker’s relatively obscure action-RPG Rent A Hero, Stories International announced today. Hot Tub Time Machine director Steve Pink, who wrote Gross Pointe Blank and High Fidelity, is attached to co-write the film with scribe Jeff Morris.

Produced by Yu Suzuki, Rent A Hero first debuted on Sega’s Japanese Mega Drive in 1991. The comedic action game stars Taro Yamada, who unwittingly becomes a hero for hire after ordering take out for a dinner party but is delivered super-powered combat armor instead. A remake, Rent A Hero No. 1, was released for Dreamcast and Xbox, but only in Japan.

Rocket League getting unlockable crates, à la Counter-Strike GO

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Rocket League getting unlockable crates, à la Counter-Strike GO

Don’t panic just yet, though

Soccer with rocket-powered cars smash hit Rocket League is getting a key-and-crate loot system, in the vein of Counter-Strike: Global Offensive and Team Fortress 2, developer Psyonix recently confirmed on Reddit. But the creators of Rocket League say players shouldn’t panic; they’re not looking to bring item gambling — and all the problems that come with it — to the competitive game.

Rocket League’s new crates and keys were discovered by a user on Reddit who spotted images of the unannounced unlockable items in recent updates to the game. Players quickly speculated that Psyonix was introducing a new way for players to acquire collectible add-ons of varying rarity.

Drivers are offering to chauffeur Pokémon Go players to hot spots

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Drivers are offering to chauffeur Pokémon Go players to hot spots

Why walk when you can ride?

Part of Pokémon Go's allure is that it encourages people to get out and exercise a little, take in the fresh air and meet other trainers during their excursions to catch all 151 Pokémon. That can get pretty tiring, though, so citizen drivers have started placing ads online offering to chauffeur Pokémon trainers to the hottest spots in their town or city.

On marketplaces like Craigslist, people have begun to offer their services for a hefty fee. In Vancouver, (where the game hasn't even officially launched, but is available through side-loading APKs on Android devices) one driver says they'll pick up drivers at a requested location and drive them around the city. The poster says they've been playing Ingress for about two years, and as such, has an idea of where to go for popular PokéStops and gyms.

Pokémon Go raises security concerns among Google users

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Pokémon Go raises security concerns among Google users

The mobile hit has full access to players' accounts

Pokémon Go is the subject of security concerns as Google users discover that the game has full access to their accounts. A Tumblr post by Adam Reeve, who works for a security analytics firm, raised attention to the level of account permissions the game has by default, revealing that players who sign in through Google grant Pokémon Go developer Niantic Labs access into the entirety of their account data.

When launching the game, players can choose to either sign in through Google — the previous owner of Niantic Labs — or through the Pokémon Trainer Club. The latter site has currently suspended new account registration, leading many to choose logging in with their Google accounts. Yet doing so doesn't prompt a pop-up indicating the information that Niantic Labs will have access to through this method; instead, it loads up the game without giving the user a chance to edit permissions.