Cuphead Studio Has "Pretty Epic" Ideas For Next Game

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Studio MDHR released one of 2018's best games in Cuphead, and there is an expansion coming in 2019, but what'll the studio make after that? The outfit has yet to officially announce its next project, but now producer and artist Maja Moldenhauer has offered a cryptic tease.

She said in a new Red Bull video feature, "I'm just really loving what we do. And the ideas we have for the next game are pretty epic." The entire feature is fantastic, and it offers a nice look behind the scenes of how Cuphead came to be and the studio culture surrounding it.

Back in June, Moldenhauer told Gamereactor that Studio MDHR's next game will likely retain Cuphead's hand-drawn, 2D-style, but "the genre, the era, [and] the gameplay" may change. Cuphead is known for being very difficult, but Moldenhauer acknowledged that Studio MDHR's next title might be "different and refreshing" as it relates to difficulty.

Ghostbusters' Leslie Jones Is Very Unhappy About The Upcoming Sequel

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Last week the surprise news emerged that there is a new Ghostbusters movie on the way, which will be released in 2020. The film will be directed by Jason Reitman, son of Ivan Reitman, who helmed the 1984 original. The first teaser was also revealed. However, there's one star connected with the Ghostbusters franchise who is not happy with this news.

Leslie Jones, who starred in the 2016 Ghostbusters reboot, took to Twitter to express her displeasure over the new movie. Jones appeared alongside Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, and Kate McKinnon in the reboot, which was directed by Bridesmaid's Paul Feig. However, it was a commercial disappointment and plans for a sequel were cancelled.

In her tweet, Jones made it quite clear that she was not happy with the decision not to continue with an all-female Ghostbusters crew. She also described it as "like something Trump would do." Check it out below:

Ghostbusters Reboot Star Is Very Unhappy About The Upcoming Sequel

about X hours ago from

Last week the surprise news emerged that there is a new Ghostbusters movie on the way, which will be released in 2020. The film will be directed by Jason Reitman, son of Ivan Reitman, who helmed the 1984 original. The first teaser was also revealed. However, there's one star connected with the Ghostbusters franchise who is not happy with this news.

Leslie Jones, who starred in the 2016 Ghostbusters reboot, took to Twitter to express her displeasure over the new movie. Jones appeared alongside Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, and Kate McKinnon in the reboot, which was directed by Bridesmaid's Paul Feig. However, it was a commercial disappointment and plans for a sequel were cancelled.

In her tweet, Jones made it quite clear that she was not happy with the decision not to continue with an all-female Ghostbusters crew. She also described it as "like something Trump would do." Check it out below:

Netflix And Hulu Both Have Fyre Festival Documentaries: Which One Is Better?

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Festivals are all the rage with this generation: millennials. From Cochella to Burning Man to Lollapalooza, it's a time to get away from all their troubles, which sure does help a lot. When new festivals pop up, asking this demographic, "Wouldn't you like to get away?," thousands of young adults flock to the desert or into the middle of a city to hang among their peers and dance the night away. However, not all of these festivals go smoothly.

In 2017, entrepreneur Billy McFarland attempted to put on a fantastical music festival in the Bahamas called the Fyre Festival. This elitist and very expensive event ended up being a total disaster. Now, both Netflix and Hulu have competing documentaries about this moment in history, but which one should you watch?

Both of these movies pretty much come to the same conclusion, that event coordinator Billy McFarland is a functioning sociopath, compulsive liar, and a modern-day snake oil salesman. However, how both these films come to that conclusion is very different.

Which Fyre Festival Documentary Should You Watch: Netflix's Or Hulu's?

about X hours ago from

In 2017, entrepreneur Billy McFarland attempted to put on a fantastical music festival in the Bahamas called the Fyre Festival. This elitist and very expensive event ended up being a total disaster. Now, both Netflix and Hulu have competing documentaries about this moment in history, but which one should you watch?

Both of these movies pretty much come to the same conclusion, that event coordinator Billy McFarland is a functioning sociopath, compulsive liar, and a modern-day snake oil salesman. However, how both these films come to that conclusion is very different.

Netflix's Fyre and Hulu's Fyre Fraud recount the events leading up to the Fyre Festival and how it all came together, which was way too quickly and without any experienced leader running it all. From having to switch the island where it was going to be held, to FEMA tents being used instead of villas, to the bands dropping out the last minute, it is the story of someone who desperately wants to be something he is ultimately not, a tech billionaire.

The Division 2's Dark Zones Are Less Intimidating, But Will Make You More Devious

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The Division 2's Dark Zones Are Less Intimidating, But Will Make You More Devious

One of The Division's most notable achievements in 2016 was its rather unorthodox approach to PvP gameplay. Within the center of post-outbreak Manhattan was the Dark Zone, an isolated, untamed space where you could engage in timed events, small skirmishes, and even backstabbing temporary allies. With The Division 2, Ubisoft has some interesting plans for expanding the Dark Zone concept, most of which will have you rethinking how you'll tackle the infamous no man's land.

We recently played several hours of the upgraded multiplayer mode, designed by original Rainbow Six developer Red Storm Entertainment. In the first game, the Dark Zone incorporated competitive multiplayer gameplay into the core systems and mechanics of the online world, allowing the agents to seamlessly transition between engagements against AI and other players in the volatile region. The developers refer to this gameplay loop as PvPvE: player-versus-player-versus-environment. While inside the zone, there are many opportunities to acquire powerful loot, but with significantly greater risk tied to it, thanks to tougher enemies and the threat of shady players looking for a chance to steal your loot.

Deadpool Creator Debuts New Marvel Character

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Marvel has announced a new bi-monthly series from the creator of Deadpool, set to debut this spring. The new series Major X will take place within the X-Men continuity, and he'll clash with popular characters like Wolverine, Storm, and Cable.

Comic Book reports that Rob Liefeld will handle the writing and art for the first issue of Major X in April. After that it will be written by Image co-founder Whilce Portacio with art from Teen Titans' Brent Peeples.

Major X comes from a different reality, called the "X-istence," which is only populated by mutants. This was a paradise for mutants, but the X-istence was destroyed somehow, and Major X is seeking to bring his home back. Liefeld teases that the book will slowly answer questions about how the X-istence came to be in the first place, and how a portal opened that put Major X into conflict with the rest of the Marvel continuity.

Pikuniku Review - Tasty Morsel

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Pikuniku Review - Tasty Morsel

With its simple character designs and a game world that often looks like a young kid designed it by cutting up and sticking together different bits of colored paper, Pikuniku sometimes feels like a video game adaption of a children's book. It tells a simple story that doesn't always quite make sense, it's pointedly very silly, and there are scenes within it that seem to be based on how a child understands the world. A giant company pays a town by making money rain from the sky; a trendy nightclub will only let you in if you dress "cool" by wearing sunglasses; you play a game someone "invented," but which is, essentially, just basketball mixed with soccer.

But Pikuniku (Japanese for "picnic") never feels like it was designed specifically for children. It's a game about battling a corporate takeover, and the writing has the playful, sarcastically irreverent tone you're more likely to see from someone in their 20s or 30s. But the childish veneer is charming, and while Pikuniku isn't the deepest game around, it's lovely, funny, and engrossing in its own weird way.