Five Ways Dying Light 2 Is A Bigger, Better, And More Intense Sequel

about X hours ago from
Five Ways Dying Light 2 Is A Bigger, Better, And More Intense Sequel

Despite the overabundance of zombie games on the market, the original Dying Light stood out from the undead horde thanks to its first-person parkour mechanics, gritty melee combat, and dynamic day/night cycle (you really didn’t want to get caught outside after the sun went down). For the sequel, Techland is not only improving upon these pillars, but also introducing a wealth of narrative choices that will shape the very city you find yourself in. Here are five big takeaways from our hands-off demo.

The ability to climb, jump, and slide your way through the city of Harran gave players a fighting chance in the original Dying Light, and Techland is literally doubling down on mobility for the sequel – players have twice the number of parkour abilities at their disposal compared to the first game. During our demo, we saw the player slide under railings, hop across the tops of lamp posts, swing around corners on a rope, and slide down a banner Errol Flynn-style by slicing through it with a knife.

Dying Light 2 also introduces parkour attacks and parkour puzzles. Parkour attacks allow players to take down enemies while navigating the environment – examples during our demo included kicking a bandit while vaulting over a waist-high gate, and knocking another enemy off of a building while swinging from an overhead bar.

Five Ways Dying Light 2 Is A Bigger, Better, And More Intense Sequel

about X hours ago from
Five Ways Dying Light 2 Is A Bigger, Better, And More Intense Sequel

Despite the overabundance of zombie games on the market, the original Dying Light stood out from the undead horde thanks to its first-person parkour mechanics, gritty melee combat, and dynamic day/night cycle (you really didn’t want to get caught outside after the sun went down). For the sequel, Techland is not only improving upon these pillars, but also introducing a wealth of narrative choices that will shape the very city you find yourself in. Here are five big takeaways from our hands-off demo.

The ability to climb, jump, and slide your way through the city of Harran gave players a fighting chance in the original Dying Light, and Techland is literally doubling down on mobility for the sequel – players have twice the number of parkour abilities at their disposal compared to the first game. During our demo, we saw the player slide under railings, hop across the tops of lamp posts, swing around corners on a rope, and slide down a banner Errol Flynn-style by slicing through it with a knife.

Dying Light 2 also introduces parkour attacks and parkour puzzles. Parkour attacks allow players to take down enemies while navigating the environment – examples during our demo included kicking a bandit while vaulting over a waist-high gate, and knocking another enemy off of a building while swinging from an overhead bar.

about X hours ago from

I don’t have long. I’m being attacked by a zombie, but I’m using one hand to type out this preview and the other to protect my neck. I’ll try to share everything I loved about the demo before this zombie bites me.

Overkill's The Walking Dead is based on Robert Kirkman’s comic, but who really cares, I came for some zombie action, and I got it. I’m tempted to make a Left 4 Dead comparison, which is fair since this is a four-player co-op shooter with hordes of zombies, but The Walking Dead allows for more tactical stealth, similar to Overkills’ Payday series. (Man, the zombie attacking me is really putting up a fight. He’s a squirmier.)

Throughout The Walking Dead, you and up to three co-op buddies head out on a series of missions to scavenge gear and help build up your home base. This means that you’ll face off against both the undead and hostile, well-armed survivors. You don’t want to be a hero and venture off on your own, because you’re safer closer to the pack. The world is very hostile and a few hits can send you to your knees. The environment is also littered with dangers like bear traps that pin you to the ground and make you a sitting duck.

about X hours ago from

I don’t have long. I’m being attacked by a zombie, but I’m using one hand to type out this preview and the other to protect my neck. I’ll try to share everything I loved about the demo before this zombie bites me. (Sorry for the typos, I'm fighting for my life.)

Overkill's The Walking Dead is based on Robert Kirkman’s comic, but who really cares, I came for some zombie action, and I got it. I’m tempted to make a Left 4 Dead comparison, which is fair since this is a four-player co-op shooter with hordes of zombies, but The Walking Dead allows for more tactical stealth, similar to Overkills’ Payday series. (Man, the zombie attacking me is really putting up a fight. He’s a squirmier.)

Throughout The Walking Dead, you and up to three co-op buddies head out on a series of missions to scavenge gear and help build up your home base. This means that you’ll face off against both the undead and hostile, well-armed survivors. You don’t want to be a hero and venture off on your own, because you’re safer closer to the pack. The world is very hostile and a few hits can send you to your knees. The environment is also littered with dangers like bear traps that pin you to the ground and make you a sitting duck.

about X hours ago from

CD Projekt Red is getting a lot of hype at this year’s E3, and everyone wants to know more about the next project from the team behind the Witcher series. But is the game really as good as everyone says? In order to find out if Cyberpunk 2077 will really be an Elder Scroll’s killer, I charmed my way into the game’s E3 demo and used my critical eye (the right one) to analyze every second of gameplay. Here are things about Cyberpunk 2077 that you should be really worried about.

Nitpick one: The game HUD features a lot of red, so if you hate that color you’ll probably hate this game by proxy. 

Nitpick two: The year 2077 is too far away. How are we supposed to know how accurate this setting is?

about X hours ago from

CD Projekt Red is getting a lot of hype at this year’s E3, and everyone wants to know more about the next project from the team behind the Witcher series. But is the game really as good as everyone says? In order to find out if Cyberpunk 2077 will really be an Elder Scroll’s killer, I charmed my way into the game’s E3 demo and used my critical eye (the right one) to analyze every second of gameplay. Here are things about Cyberpunk 2077 that you should be really worried about.

Nitpick one: The game HUD features a lot of red, so if you hate that color you’ll probably hate this game by proxy. 

Nitpick two: The year 2077 is too far away. How are we supposed to know how accurate this setting is?

What We Loved From Just Cause 4’s Stupid Demo

about X hours ago from
What We Loved From Just Cause 4’s Stupid Demo

Avalanche Studios has been delighting E3 ongoers all week with an action-packed demo of Just Cause 4, and if you’re looking for a traditional preview of what they showed, Javy has you covered. However, he’s not the only one who saw the tools of destruction that Rico Rodriguez is packing this time around. Jeff Cork and Jeff Marchiafava also sat in on the demo, with a laser focus on the kind of stupid fun in-game pranksters can look forward to. Rather than keep their ruminations to themselves, they decided to memorialize their thoughts about Just Cause 4 in a text conversation, which you can conveniently view below. You’re welcome!

Jeff Cork: Hello, Jeff Marchiafava! Remember when we saw the Just Cause 4 demo together? What was the biggest surprise for you? Personally, I wasn’t expecting to learn that the tornadoes that were highlighted in the reveal trailer are being controlled by various factions in the game through some kind of weird array of high-powered fans. And no, I am not making that up. The tornadoes in the game are, indeed, being controlled through some kind of weird array of high-powered fans. 

What We Loved From Just Cause 4’s Stupid Demo

about X hours ago from
What We Loved From Just Cause 4’s Stupid Demo

Avalanche Studios has been delighting E3 ongoers all week with an action-packed demo of Just Cause 4, and if you’re looking for a traditional preview of what they showed, Javy has you covered. However, he’s not the only one who saw the tools of destruction that Rico Rodriguez is packing this time around. Jeff Cork and Jeff Marchiafava also sat in on the demo, with a laser focus on the kind of stupid fun in-game pranksters can look forward to. Rather than keep their ruminations to themselves, they decided to memorialize their thoughts about Just Cause 4 in a text conversation, which you can conveniently view below. You’re welcome!

Jeff Cork: Hello, Jeff Marchiafava! Remember when we saw the Just Cause 4 demo together? What was the biggest surprise for you? Personally, I wasn’t expecting to learn that the tornadoes that were highlighted in the reveal trailer are being controlled by various factions in the game through some kind of weird array of high-powered fans. And no, I am not making that up. The tornadoes in the game are, indeed, being controlled through some kind of weird array of high-powered fans. 

Dead Or Alive 6 Puts Fighting Back In Focus And Lowers The Skill Ceiling

about X hours ago from
Dead Or Alive 6 Puts Fighting Back In Focus And Lowers The Skill Ceiling

Dead or Alive 6 was announced last week, the first full sequel in the series since Dead or Alive 5 released in 2012, and Dead or Alive 4 in 2006 before that. The series does not treat full sequels lightly and tends to try and interpret the wishes of its community through their own development lens with new features and characters and overall focuses with each new game. With Dead or Alive 6, Team Ninja and KOEI Tecmo are trying to fit the 22-year-old series into a more modern mold while not leaving what fans like about the series behind.

The new big addition to Dead or Alive 6 is the Fatal Rush button. Much like a lot of other modern fighting games, Dead or Alive 6 adds an auto-combo button, but places it as its own separate skill. Gone is the Power Blow from the previous game, with the button replaced by a combo that does fairly significant damage to the enemy. If the meter is full, a Fatal Rush culminates in a move similar to what a Critical Blow in Dead or Alive 5 ended with. 

Dead Or Alive 6 Puts Fighting Back In Focus And Lowers The Skill Ceiling

about X hours ago from
Dead Or Alive 6 Puts Fighting Back In Focus And Lowers The Skill Ceiling

Dead or Alive 6 was announced last week, the first full sequel in the series since Dead or Alive 5 released in 2012, and Dead or Alive 4 in 2006 before that. The series does not treat full sequels lightly and tends to try and interpret the wishes of its community through their own development lens with new features and characters and overall focuses with each new game. With Dead or Alive 6, Team Ninja and KOEI Tecmo are trying to fit the 22-year-old series into a more modern mold while not leaving what fans like about the series behind.

The new big addition to Dead or Alive 6 is the Fatal Rush button. Much like a lot of other modern fighting games, Dead or Alive 6 adds an auto-combo button, but places it as its own separate skill. Gone is the Power Blow from the previous game, with the button replaced by a combo that does fairly significant damage to the enemy. If the meter is full, a Fatal Rush culminates in a move similar to what a Critical Blow in Dead or Alive 5 ended with.