The Larger World Of Forza Horizon 4

about X hours ago from
The Larger World Of Forza Horizon 4

The Forza Horizon franchise has always been about an open world, but Forza Horizon 4 is stretching that in new ways for the series. We talked with the developers at Playground Games in more depth about the what players can expect as they explore, engage in co-op with friends, and enjoy the seamless environment.

Driving around the world, you will always have access to 12 real-life drivers. Moreover, this online state can easily be switched off at any time, at which time the game reverts back to the drivatar-filled world you’re used to. As you race along, your friends can follow you across the map, but the game will load in instances of other real-life drivers.

Players experience four distinct seasons, which introduce their own handling challenges and even open up new areas of the map, and the seasons change for everyone at the same time once per week.

Lara Has Some Devious New Tools In Shadow Of The Tomb Raider

about X hours ago from
Lara Has Some Devious New Tools In Shadow Of The Tomb Raider

The Tomb Raider reboot has been about building up Lara Croft from a determined but inexperienced explorer to the hero we know today. During our E3 demo of Shadow of the Tomb Raider, we got to play her as a full-on predator, culminating in a chilling scene that shows her confronting – and dismissing – any remaining fears or lingering insecurities.

Unlike the last demo, which featured a gunfight that didn’t end until either Lara or her Trinity adversaries were dead, today’s demo was more flexible. It’s set in a Peruvian jungle, with multiple routes and paths to explore. Lara moves through a dirt trail, as a radio crackles to live with a warning that “Croft is heading to your location.” She climbs a tree, and sees a trio of enemies below her. Jumping down and taking them out with her knife would be a dangerously stupid thing to attempt, so I draw my bow and fire a new fear arrow into the neck of the closest goon.

Lara Has Some Devious New Tools In Shadow Of The Tomb Raider

about X hours ago from
Lara Has Some Devious New Tools In Shadow Of The Tomb Raider

The Tomb Raider reboot has been about building up Lara Croft from a determined but inexperienced explorer to the hero we know today. During our E3 demo of Shadow of the Tomb Raider, we got to play her as a full-on predator, culminating in a chilling scene that shows her confronting – and dismissing – any remaining fears or lingering insecurities.

Unlike the last demo, which featured a gunfight that didn’t end until either Lara or her Trinity adversaries were dead, today’s demo was more flexible. It’s set in a Peruvian jungle, with multiple routes and paths to explore. Lara moves through a dirt trail, as a radio crackles to live with a warning that “Croft is heading to your location.” She climbs a tree, and sees a trio of enemies below her. Jumping down and taking them out with her knife would be a dangerously stupid thing to attempt, so I draw my bow and fire a new fear arrow into the neck of the closest goon.

about X hours ago from

One of the most exciting features on the way in the release of Destiny 2: Forsaken is a new weapon archetype. The bow changes up the battlefield in some important ways, not least because it’s a distance weapon that isn’t actually a gun.

I had the good fortune to get some extensive early hands-on time with the bow, and rapidly found the potential for fun. The pace of shooting is different from what we’ve come to expect with the guns of Destiny 2, and the change is refreshing. “There’s a pace and rhythm to it that is totally different from our other weapons – adding more anticipation to your shots sort of puts you in a zen-like trance,” says designer Greg Peng. “Draw, Aim, Fire, Nock, Draw, Aim, Fire, Nock, Draw, Aim Fire.” Until you shoot it for yourself, it’s hard to grasp the natural feel of the shooting. It delivers as a high-risk, high reward weapon. You invest a significant micro-chunk of time to draw the bow back and get to full power, so nailing the precision hit is essential. But when it connects (often killing PvE enemies in one shot) it’s immensely satisfying.

Continue reading...

about X hours ago from

One of the most exciting features on the way in the release of Destiny 2: Forsaken is a new weapon archetype. The bow changes up the battlefield in some important ways, not least because it’s a distance weapon that isn’t actually a gun.

I had the good fortune to get some extensive early hands-on time with the bow, and rapidly found the potential for fun. The pace of shooting is different from what we’ve come to expect with the guns of Destiny 2, and the change is refreshing. “There’s a pace and rhythm to it that is totally different from our other weapons – adding more anticipation to your shots sort of puts you in a zen-like trance,” says designer Greg Peng. “Draw, Aim, Fire, Nock, Draw, Aim, Fire, Nock, Draw, Aim Fire.” Until you shoot it for yourself, it’s hard to grasp the natural feel of the shooting. It delivers as a high-risk, high reward weapon. You invest a significant micro-chunk of time to draw the bow back and get to full power, so nailing the precision hit is essential. But when it connects (often killing PvE enemies in one shot) it’s immensely satisfying.

Continue reading...

5 Reasons Tetris Effect Might Be The Umpteenth Time You Buy Tetris

about X hours ago from
5 Reasons Tetris Effect Might Be The Umpteenth Time You Buy Tetris

Tetris is one of the most readily available games in the world, and yet people keep making new versions of it. Most of them are generally unaltered, content to act as a quick and easy way to get the game on new platforms and services.

Tetsuya Mizuguchi's take on Tetris is a bit different. While the basic premise is still the same (I'm not going to explain Tetris to you), the way Tetris Effect alters the experience is more about altering the experience of playing Tetris than the game itself, and from my short demo at E3 this year, I think it really works.

I didn't think I'd come away excited about game I've played all my life at E3, but here are five reasons I'm excited to put on some headphones and play some damn Tetris in 2018.

5 Reasons Tetris Effect Might Be The Umpteenth Time You Buy Tetris

about X hours ago from
5 Reasons Tetris Effect Might Be The Umpteenth Time You Buy Tetris

Tetris is one of the most readily available games in the world, and yet people keep making new versions of it. Most of them are generally unaltered, content to act as a quick and easy way to get the game on new platforms and services.

Tetsuya Mizuguchi's take on Tetris is a bit different. While the basic premise is still the same (I'm not going to explain Tetris to you), the way Tetris Effect alters the experience is more about altering the experience of playing Tetris than the game itself, and from my short demo at E3 this year, I think it really works.

I didn't think I'd come away excited about game I've played all my life at E3, but here are five reasons I'm excited to put on some headphones and play some damn Tetris in 2018.

Ori And The Will Of The Wisps Wisely Builds On Strong Foundations

about X hours ago from
Ori And The Will Of The Wisps Wisely Builds On Strong Foundations

At a behind doors demonstration during E3, we got to see some more of the sequel to Ori and The Blind Forest in action. The original game wooed us back in 2014 with its Metroid-like gameplay and beautiful graphics. From what we saw Will Of The Wisps, a sequel due out on Xbox One in 2018, will give fans of the first game even more beauty to gawk over while also adding a surprisingly in-depth combat system to the mix.

The demo we watched was short, focusing on Original explore a desert area called The Windswept Wastes. A new burrowing mechanic let Ori dive in and out of sandpits to tangle with nasty, fanged worm enemies. While on the surface, Ori had a whole suite of abilities to take on baddies, including a magical spear, bow & arrow, hammer, and self-healing ability. 

Perhaps the most impressive thing about Will of the Wisps, like the original game, is the fluidity of movement. Ori's movements recall an almost 90s Disney-like animation style, with the little fella zipping back and forth, launching volleys of arrows before bouncing out of a pit with two well-placed jumps. The speed and beauty of Ori's attacks and evasive maneuvers is lovely to behold and, just as it did with the platforming in the original game, gives Will Of The Wisps' combat its own unique identity.

Ori And The Will Of The Wisps Wisely Builds On Its Strong Foundations

about X hours ago from
Ori And The Will Of The Wisps Wisely Builds On Its Strong Foundations

At a behind doors demonstration during E3, we got to see some more of the sequel to Ori and The Blind Forest in action. The original game wooed us back in 2014 with its Metroid-like gameplay and beautiful graphics. From what we saw Will Of The Wisps, a sequel due out on Xbox One in 2018, will give fans of the first game even more beauty to gawk over while also adding a surprisingly in-depth combat system to the mix.

The demo we watched was short, focusing on Original explore a desert area called The Windswept Wastes. A new burrowing mechanic let Ori dive and out of sandpits to tangle with nasty, fanged worm enemies. While on the surface, Ori had a whole suite of abilities to take on baddies, including a magical spear, bow & arrow, hammer, and self-healing ability. 

Perhaps the most impressive thing about Will of the Wisps, like the original game, is the fluidity of movement. Ori's movements recall an almost 90s Disney-like animation style, with the little fella zipping back and forth, launching volleys of arrows before bouncing out of a pit with two well-placed jumps. The speed and beauty of Ori's attacks and evasive maneuvers is lovely to behold and, just as it did with the platforming in the original game, gives Will Of The Wisps' combat its own unique identity.

about X hours ago from

Resident Evil 2 is one of the most beloved Resident Evil games of all time. It has a beloved-ometer rating of over 780. It’s so loved that fans have been asking for a remake for decades. Then in 2015, Capcom announced that it would finally remake the entry that fans had been asking about for years. At E3 we went hands on with the game to see if it is everything we want. Here are our two biggest takeaways.

I know I only promised you two details, so don’t tell anyone that I’m giving you a few extra.

Bonus detail: The game features a behind the shoulder camera similar to Resident Evil 4, but this game retains its survival horror focus. Where Resident Evil 4-6 were more action oriented, the remake of 2 is moodier and slower, featuring the classic puzzles and Metroid-like elements of the original game.