Strange Brigade's Launch Trailer Shows The Dangers Of Treasure Hunting

about X hours ago from
Strange Brigade's Launch Trailer Shows The Dangers Of Treasure Hunting

Strange Brigade, the four-player co-op shooter from Rebellion, comes out incredibly soon. The early 20th century aesthetics meet hordes of mummies in this CG launch trailer for the game, showing off all four playable characters. Get a look at the trials and tribulations of the strange brigade and their means of overcoming them below.

In addition, the trailer includes mention of a fifth playable character, the gentleman Winston Bey. Bey is available to anyone who preorders the game or buys it in the first 30 days of release.

Strange Brigade releases on August 28 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.

I Talked To The Quiet Man Developers And I’m Still Confused

about X hours ago from
I Talked To The Quiet Man Developers And I’m Still Confused

Square’s The Quiet Man is an experimental game for sure. This three-hour experience combines live-action storytelling with simple brawler gameplay to tell a story about a deaf man and his quest through a soundless world to rescue a woman from a masked man. Some people felt it was the worst debut at E3 this year, because its announcement trailer looks bananas.

Producer Kensei Fujinaga didn’t help much when he described the game as follows in an open letter, “Words shape consciousness; indeed, some even say that ‘words are life.’ But what if we were to cast aside such a life? What if somehow, we were able to understand one another through connections formed heart to heart, soul to soul, and could once again look into one another’s eyes and form a bond so pure? This concept lies at the core of The Quiet Man.”

I don’t know what he’s talking about. Fortunately, a recent livestream helped shed some light on the project, but I was curious to know more, so during a Gamescom interview, I asked Fujinaga about The Quiet Man’s combat.

I Talked To The Quiet Man Developers And I’m Still Confused

about X hours ago from
I Talked To The Quiet Man Developers And I’m Still Confused

Square’s The Quiet Man is an experimental game for sure. This three-hour experience combines live-action storytelling with simple brawler gameplay to tell a story about a deaf man and his quest through a soundless world to rescue a woman from a masked man. Some people felt it was the worst debut at E3 this year, because its announcement trailer looks bananas.

Producer Kensei Fujinaga didn’t help much when he described the game as follows in an open letter, “Words shape consciousness; indeed, some even say that ‘words are life.’ But what if we were to cast aside such a life? What if somehow, we were able to understand one another through connections formed heart to heart, soul to soul, and could once again look into one another’s eyes and form a bond so pure? This concept lies at the core of The Quiet Man.”

I don’t know what he’s talking about. Fortunately, a recent livestream helped shed some light on the project, but I was curious to know more, so during a Gamescom interview, I asked Fujinaga about The Quiet Man’s combat.

Ubisoft Reveals How It Ruined D.C. For The Divison 2

about X hours ago from
Ubisoft Reveals How It Ruined D.C. For The Divison 2

The Division 2 is pulling its stakes and moving the action from New York City to another familiar American location. In a behind-closed-doors presentation at Gamescom, lead level designer Manny Diaz explained how the team created its nearly 1:1 recreation of the nation’s capital – and how it wasn’t their first idea when it came time to pick a new setting.

Diaz says players spent a lot of time in The Division’s world, and the development team wanted to make the sequel feel a little unfamiliar. One way was by jumping ahead seven months from the timeline of the original game. The next was to move it to Washington, D.C., which is packed with loads of familiar setpieces and neighborhoods. Having a massive raid underneath the Washington Monument or in the shadow of the Lincoln Memorial sounds as exciting as it is unsettling.

The developers pondered several other metropolitan areas first, however. Diaz showed several slides of concept art, including one that featured the Seattle skyline. Everything seemed normal at first glance – the Space Needle was prominently featured, of course – but a building in the back was ablaze. Another early option was New Orleans, for its blend of interesting culture and varied terrain. 

Ubisoft Reveals How It Ruined D.C. For The Division 2

about X hours ago from
Ubisoft Reveals How It Ruined D.C. For The Division 2

The Division 2 is pulling its stakes and moving the action from New York City to another familiar American location. In a behind-closed-doors presentation at Gamescom, lead level designer Manny Diaz explained how the team created its nearly 1:1 recreation of the nation’s capital – and how it wasn’t their first idea when it came time to pick a new setting.

Diaz says players spent a lot of time in The Division’s world, and the development team wanted to make the sequel feel a little unfamiliar. One way was by jumping ahead seven months from the timeline of the original game. The next was to move it to Washington, D.C., which is packed with loads of familiar setpieces and neighborhoods. Having a massive raid underneath the Washington Monument or in the shadow of the Lincoln Memorial sounds as exciting as it is unsettling.

The developers pondered several other metropolitan areas first, however. Diaz showed several slides of concept art, including one that featured the Seattle skyline. Everything seemed normal at first glance – the Space Needle was prominently featured, of course – but a building in the back was ablaze. Another early option was New Orleans, for its blend of interesting culture and varied terrain. 

about X hours ago from

Ori and the Will of the Wisps is the gorgeous sequel to the 2015 release Ori and the Blind Forest. With the sequel, the team has overhauled combat in a major way, but Moon also wanted to add an entirely new mode for players as well. Early in development, the team experimented with a co-op mode, but struggled to make this style of game fun. The studio felt like players were either running off on their own or waiting around for their co-op buddies help. Moon Studios experimented with several ways to make co-op work, but Metroid-like games don’t lend themselves well to multiplayer.

“There are so many things that we tried because we wanted to see what would be really fun for friends to do together, and multiplayer was one of them,” says CEO and co-founder of Moon Studios Thomas Mahler. “Co-op never really works for Metroivanias. You have games like Portrait of Ruin that tried it, but that was kind of lame. In Ori, I don’t want to have anything that I’m not 100 percent convinced is super popular. I love watching Games Done Quick and what they’ve done with Ori, so this feels like a good way to give back.”

about X hours ago from

Ori and the Will of the Wisps is the gorgeous sequel to the 2015 release Ori and the Blind Forest. With the sequel, the team has overhauled combat in a major way, but Moon also wanted to add an entirely new mode for players as well. Early in development, the team experimented with a co-op mode, but struggled to make this style of game fun. The studio felt like players were either running off on their own or waiting around for their co-op buddies help. Moon Studios experimented with several ways to make co-op work, but Metroid-like games don’t lend themselves well to multiplayer.

“There are so many things that we tried because we wanted to see what would be really fun for friends to do together, and multiplayer was one of them,” says CEO and co-founder of Moon Studios Thomas Mahler. “Co-op never really works for Metroivanias. You have games like Portrait of Ruin that tried it, but that was kind of lame. In Ori, I don’t want to have anything that I’m not 100 percent convinced is super popular. I love watching Games Done Quick and what they’ve done with Ori, so this feels like a good way to give back.”

We Go Hands-On With Supermassive's New Horror Anthology, The Dark Pictures

about X hours ago from
We Go Hands-On With Supermassive's New Horror Anthology, The Dark Pictures

When Supermassive’s cult-classic horror hit Until Dawn released on PlayStation 4 in 2015, fans were surprised by the tropey-but-fun take on decades of horror movies. The adventure game was for anyone that has ever yelled at a scary movie to scold the characters for making illogical decisions by placing those decisions in the players’ hands, more or less deciding who lives and dies. Supermassive’s follow ups failed to capture the same charm, with Rush of Blood, the fairly different VR prequel Inpatient, and social PlayLink initiative Hidden Agenda failing to hit the same notes that made Until Dawn well-loved.

At Gamescom this year, Bandai Namco announced Supermassive has begun working on The Dark Pictures Anthology, a series of games centered around scaring the player with the same gameplay style as Until Dawn. When I asked Bandai Namco for information on what exactly the anthology entailed, it took a few analogies and examples to clarify that The Dark Pictures Anthology is a game series and the first game announced for it is Man of Medan, which we got to take for a spin this week.

We Go Hands-On With Supermassive's New Horror Anthology, The Dark Pictures

about X hours ago from
We Go Hands-On With Supermassive's New Horror Anthology, The Dark Pictures

When Supermassive’s cult-classic horror hit Until Dawn released on PlayStation 4 in 2015, fans were surprised by the tropey-but-fun take on decades of horror movies. The adventure game was for anyone that has ever yelled at a scary movie to scold the characters for making illogical decisions by placing those decisions in the players’ hands, more or less deciding who lives and dies. Supermassive’s follow ups failed to capture the same charm, with Rush of Blood, the fairly different VR prequel Inpatient, and social PlayLink initiative Hidden Agenda failing to hit the same notes that made Until Dawn well-loved.

At Gamescom this year, Bandai Namco announced Supermassive has begun working on The Dark Pictures Anthology, a series of games centered around scaring the player with the same gameplay style as Until Dawn. When I asked Bandai Namco for information on what exactly the anthology entailed, it took a few analogies and examples to clarify that The Dark Pictures Anthology is a game series and the first game announced for it is Man of Medan, which we got to take for a spin this week.

Former Bioware Devs Announce Co-op Action RPG Breach

about X hours ago from
Former Bioware Devs Announce Co-op Action RPG Breach

QC Games, a development team made of former Bioware developers, announced today an online cooperative action RPG called Breach. The team is made up of members that worked on Star Wars: The Old Republic, the Dragon Age series, and the cancelled, Shadow Realms. We don't know a lot about Shadow Realms, but we do it was a four versus one action game, like Breach.

In Breach, players must battle creatures of a parallel alternate mythological Earth that is invading modern Earth. Players pick a class to take on the Veil Demon, an antagonist that is controlled by another player. The Veil Demon can control the enemies and summon boss creatures. You can check out the trailer which details some of the available classes like Gunslinger and the Chronomancer.

Breach will enter early access later this year with plans to enter a full, free-to-play launch in 2019. You can sign up to participate in the alpha by heading here. You can also check out a screenshot gallery from the game below.