We Take A Deeper Dive Into Destiny 2's New EDZ Screens

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We Take A Deeper Dive Into Destiny 2's New EDZ Screens

Bungie designed Destiny 2 from the ground up without worrying about last gen consoles, and the game looks much better as a result. Destiny 2's European Dead Zone is ripe with unique activities. Here are some of the highlights from our time with the game.

Public events are full of imposing enemies like this one. However, if you can power through the challenge more quickly than normal, the event will click over and become a Heroic event, which is more challenging but offers better rewards.


The original Destiny didn’t have quest givers stationed in play zones, but that changes with Destiny 2. Devrim Kay is a sniper who sets up shop in an derelict church in old Europe. He will give you new missions and offer gear that might come in handy during your adventures.

Watch 90 Minutes Of Gameplay From The New European Dead Zone

about X hours ago from
Watch 90 Minutes Of Gameplay From The New European Dead Zone

Destiny 2 has no shortage of activities: New side missions, NPCs, harder public events, and hidden treasures are all just the tip of the iceburg. Destiny 2's new zones feel more alive and are more interesting to explore, and one of the game's newest playspaces, the European Dead Zone, is a great place to showcase this new content.

But we'll let the game speak for itself. Here's an extended look at the game and its European Dead Zone.

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We Explore The European Dead Zone And New Map System

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We Explore The European Dead Zone And New Map System

Destiny 2’s European Dead Zone is the largest playable space Bungie has ever designed. This new region on Earth is filled with pre-Golden Age ruins and a lot of unique activities that help make the space feel alive.

Ben Reeves and Matt Miller took a brief look at the EDZ and break down how Destiny 2’s new map helps direct players to a swath of great activities.

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Doing Its Own Beautiful Thing

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Doing Its Own Beautiful Thing

Zoink Games' upcoming game Fe turned heads when it was first announced at E3 2016, though it was more of a double take. The game seemed to share an awful lot with Ori and the Blind Forest, including similar color palettes, focus on nature and emotional storytelling, and adorable (though a little weird-looking) titular characters. I got a demo of it today during Gamescom, and I'm glad to say that those similarities are superficial, at best. 

Where Ori and the Blind Forest is a challenging platformer, Fe is more about exploration and learning how to get around in a strange-but-familiar natural world. Players take control of Fe, a creature who serves as a forest guardian. At first, Fe's capabilities are limited to moving and singing – though it's more of a charming warble than anything that resembles music. The world responds to Fe's voice in a number of different ways; grass grows a little in response, flowers open and reveal platforms that can be jumped onto, and animals can be befriended. That last one can be tricky, since the forest's creatures are naturally wary of Fe, as well-intentioned as it might be.

We Take Payback For A Test Drive, On And Off The Road

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We Take Payback For A Test Drive, On And Off The Road

The Need for Speed series has long been about hot pursuits and narrow escapes, but Need for Speed Payback chases those thrills in some new ways. I got some hands-on time with the game during Gamescom, where I poked a hornet's nest and tested out some of the game's new off-road action.

One of Paybacks new activities comes in the form of bait crates. These are mini-sting operations set up by Fortune Valley's police department to catch thieves. When you hop into a bait-crate mission, your objective is simple: Evade the cops until they lose interest in your speedy butt. The prize – loot contained inside the crate – is sent to your garage. Don't worry; the police in Fortune Valley are in the pocket of a criminal organization known as The House, so you needn't feel guilty about breaking the law.

Marvel Vs. Capcom: Infinite Gameplay From The Dark Dimension

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Marvel Vs. Capcom: Infinite Gameplay From The Dark Dimension

Capcom has released a new trailer for Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite showing off gameplay battles involving Ghost Rider, Jedah, Firebrand, and Dormammu.

Our own fighting expert Suriel has gotten his hands on the game, and notes tweaks such as Dormammu's special now making it easier to fire Liberation blasts, as well as Ghost Rider's ability to fight up close as well as from a distance.

Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite comes out on September 19 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.

More Than Just A Dragon Ball Fan's Dream Fighter

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More Than Just A Dragon Ball Fan's Dream Fighter

This past E3, a Cinderalla story started formed around Arc System Works’ Dragon Ball Z fighting game, efficiently named Dragon Ball FighterZ. Comparisons to other fighting games flattered Dragon Ball, but the game is impressive all on its own, and it continues to look and play far better than you would think a licensed fighting game could.

The build I played featured the newly announced Androids 18 and 16, along with Piccolo and Krillin who were announced a few weeks prior but haven’t been playable until now. I kept coming back to the table where FighterZ was set up just to get a few more rounds in.

I can’t say at this point that FighterZ is the best fighting game I have ever played, but it is one of the most fun times I have had playing a fighting game.

A Brutal Platformer That Is Both Punishing And Beautifully Wacky

about X hours ago from
A Brutal Platformer That Is Both Punishing And Beautifully Wacky

Reminiscent of games like Contra, StudioMDHR's Cuphead is a run 'n gun platformer with a steep but satisfying learning curve, and it's got one of the most unique aesthetics I've seen in a game to date. Inspired by both retro games and 1930s cartoons, Cuphead is absolutely endearing, but also so brutally hard that I kept dying over and over again -- and that's far from a bad thing.

Cuphead is a difficult game, but in an incredibly satisfying way. As I struggled to even make it through the first level of the game, I was hit with a wave of joy when I finally beat it. My tiny Cuphead character waved his arms around and cheered, as if he were as happy as I was for the success. In the demo I played, I got to try the opening level solo, and two boss battles in co-op. 

With infinite enemies coming at you without pause, Cuphead keeps you on your feet. You can swap between two attacks at a time, which in the demo included both blue and red projectiles. Swapping is essential: I learnt quickly that the blue attack was best at long distance, and the red attack has a larger area of effect. At the end of each stage, you're graded on how well you do, but that doesn't involve just surviving or how quickly you beat it. For example, you can accumulate extra points and fill up a special attack meter by hitting color coded objects with a parry ability. 

We Take Out The Rebel Scum In New Starfighter Assault Mode

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We Take Out The Rebel Scum In New Starfighter Assault Mode

As any veteran of Star Wars: TIE Fighter knows, flying for the bad guys is a thankless job. You're a disposable hunk of sentient meat piloting an equally disposable spacecraft. What they lack in sentimentality, the Empire makes up for in the raw numbers. Go ahead and gloat over those kills, rebels. There are more where they came from. After spending some hands-on time with Star Wars Battlefront II's new Starfighter Assault mode, however, I have a greater appreciation for TIE fighters – not for the sacrifices that their pilots make, but for how these much-maligned ships are actually quite great.

Our battle took place over the planet of Fondor, around one of its orbital shipyards. A recuperating imperial star destroyer was in dry dock, and as an imperial pilot, my job was to ensure that the rebels didn't take out the incapacitated titan. Fortunately, I was part of a team of 12, bolstered by a variety of A.I. controlled ships to add to the delightful confusion and visual impact of this 24-player battle. 

An Existential Undersea Threat

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An Existential Undersea Threat

THQ Nordic and Digital Arrow are bringing back the AquaNox series in Aquanox: Deep Descent, a game that blends atmospheric undersea exploration with combat that's reminiscent of sci-fi space battles. We got to see the latest version of the game today at Gamescom, and it's shaping up nicely.

The game's set in 2370, in a post-apocalyptic future where mankind has moved undersea after ravaging the Earth's surface. Humans being human, old rivalries have reemerged in the new setting, and factions fight underwater for resources and power. You play as one of four crew members who has been brought back from suspended animation to help address a new threat: a new type of plankton that consumes anything manmade that it touches.  

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