Find Out Why Dishonored: Death Of The Outsider Could Be The Series' Final Act

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Find Out Why Dishonored: Death Of The Outsider Could Be The Series' Final Act

One question is all it took for Arkane Studios' Harvey Smith to spiral into a deep and philosophical journey recapping eight years of working on the Dishonored series. Smith was energetic and clearly proud of the work he and his team had produced, but also somber, as Death of the Outsider brings closure to that journey. Death of the Outsider is a standalone game that is shorter than the previous two adventures starring Corvo and Emily, but still offers five meaty chapters that equate to nine to twelve hours of gameplay. I talked to Smith about this potential final act for the series, and learn plenty about the mysterious Outsider in the process.

Game Informer: The Outsider is one of my favorite creations by Arkane Studios – an enigmatic being that always seems to be watching you or making his presence known at the right times. Taking all of that into account, when I see the name "Death of the Outsider," I immediately think this is the end of the road for this series. Is this the finale?

The Evil Within 2 Director Discusses 'Beauty Of The Grotesque And Death'

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The Evil Within 2 Director Discusses 'Beauty Of The Grotesque And Death'

Shinji Mikami, who is often referenced as the "father of survival horror" for his work on the Resident Evil series, is not returning to the director's chair for The Evil Within 2. That responsibility has been passed to John Johanas, the visual effects designer of the first Evil Within game, and director of the game's two DLC adventures, The Assignment and The Consequence. We talked to Johanas about filling Mikami's shoes, and the challenge of scaring players again.

Game Informer: Stepping into the director’s role is obviously a huge undertaking. What did you learn along the way working under Shinji Mikami on The Evil Within? Did directing The Assignment and The Consequence properly prepare you for the task?

John Johanas: Working under Mikami-san taught me that game design is much more organic than I thought. It’s important to go with your instinct, with ideas you feel good about and let them take their course. But you also have to be critical over how people receive it and how you think players will respond, because eventually they are the ones who will judge it. Course-correcting is hard, but necessary for turning ideas into great games.

Investigating A Slaughter In The Rule-Breaking Open-World RPG

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Don’t let the swords and shields in Kingdom Come: Deliverance lead you astray. You won’t be clearing out goblin dens or slaying dragons in this open-world RPG. And don’t think that you’ll be slaughtering entire armies or ascending to the throne, either. Warhorse Studios’ game is more grounded in reality that what we’ve come to expect from the genre, and what I played of it at Gamescom was a refreshing change of pace.

The game takes place in 1403 in the Kingdom of Bohemia, in lands which are now in the modern-day Czech Republic. You play Henry, the son of a blacksmith whose parents were killed by raiders. Henry’s early motivations are simple: He wants to track one of the raiders, a large man wearing black armor. That man stole a sword from Henry’s father, which was commissioned by the lord of their town.

My demo begins a few hours into the story, and at this point Henry’s participation in a battle – which I don’t see – impressed the lord enough for him to take Henry into his personal service. The lord’s gruff commander is less impressed, and he reluctantly agrees to let Henry tag along with the soldiers on their next task. Another group of bloodthirsty raiders has attacked a nearby stable, and the soldiers have to investigate. And, wouldn’t you know it, one of those raiders was clad in black armor.

A Remaster Of The SNES Classic

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A Remaster Of The SNES Classic

Old-school Square Enix fans will be happy to hear that the company has announced a remastered version of its SNES classic, Secret of Mana, set to debut on February 15. While the Seiken Densetsu collection saw release in Japan for the Switch, this is a brand-new iteration that will see release on the PS4, PS Vita, and PC via Steam.  Console fans looking to get their hands on a disc (or cartridge) will be disappointed, as this remaster will only be available digitally.

However, the game will be fully voiced in English, as well as seeing a suite of enhanced 3D visuals.  We don’t have the full details yet, but you can check out the game below in screenshots and video while you start your half-year wait.

If you pre-order through the PlayStation Store, you receive receive special character costumes: “Moogle Suit” for Randi, Primm and Popoi, “Tiger Two-Piece” for Primm and “Tiger Suit” for Randi and Popoi alongisde three PSN avatars. If you pre-order or purchase the Day One Edition within a week of launch, you get three costumes.

The SNES Classic Gets Enhanced

about X hours ago from
The SNES Classic Gets Enhanced

Old-school Square Enix fans will be happy to hear that the company has announced a remade version of its SNES classic, Secret of Mana. The game is set to debut on February 15. While the Seiken Densetsu collection saw release in Japan for the Switch, this is a brand-new iteration that will see release on the PS4, PS Vita, and PC via Steam. Console fans looking to get their hands on a disc (or cartridge) will be disappointed, as this remake will only be available digitally.

However, the game will be fully voiced in English, as well as seeing a suite of enhanced 3D visuals. We don’t have the full details yet, but you can check out the game below in screenshots and video while you start your half-year wait.

If you pre-order through the PlayStation Store, you receive special character costumes: “Moogle Suit” for Randi, Primm and Popoi, “Tiger Two-Piece” for Primm and “Tiger Suit” for Randi and Popoi alongside three PSN avatars. If you pre-order or purchase the Day One Edition within a week of launch on Steam, you get three costumes and wallpaper. 

Hands-On With The Evil Within 2 – Bigger Scares, Bigger World

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Hands-On With The Evil Within 2 – Bigger Scares, Bigger World

My eyes caught something shimmering in knee-high grass. At first it looked like a dog, maybe a wolf. The only thing I could fully comprehend was its hunger; I was being hunted. When it slithered out of the field, I was even more confused by what I saw. Like a beast born of H. P. Lovecraft's mind, I couldn't quite make out what I was looking at. I counted at least four legs, something that appeared to be a tail, but could have just been a giant piece of flesh flopping around, and three heads. Yes, I was convinced it had three heads, and six glowing, red eyes.

The beast lunged at me, and slashed my chest. I toppled to the ground, but quickly got to my feet, only to foolishly sprint into the field. The beast noisily gave chase, and it was only a matter of time before I felt those claws again. Before I knew what hit me, I was on the ground; the open maw of the beast consumed my head and ripped it clean off of my body.

This was one of the three deaths that befell protagonist Sebastian Castellanos during my hour-long play session of The Evil Within 2. I never got a good look at that beast, and I sure as hell wasn't going to take another look. I wasn't prepared for that encounter, both mentally or in firepower. I just had a pistol with 10 precious bullets.

Developer Diary Highlights Your Arsenal

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Developer Diary Highlights Your Arsenal

Hunt: Showdown is an Old West gothic-horror competitive survival game. If you think that sounds like a lot of ideas for one game, you're right – but that doesn't mean developer Crytek can't pull it off. What we've seen of the game so far has us excited, and the latest developer diary dives deeper into the weapons at your disposal.

How does the team recreate late-1800s guns? How does that process compare to designing more fantasy-inspired weaponry? These questions and more are addressed in the video below. 

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NHL 18 Expansion Draft First Look – Can You Build A Playoff Team In One Season?

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NHL 18 Expansion Draft First Look – Can You Build A Playoff Team In One Season?

With the Las Vegas Golden Knights joining the NHL as the 31st franchise this year, the league currently sits as an odd number. Commissioner Gary Bettman has already entertained the addition of a second expansion team in the near future, which is likely why EA Sports was allowed to give users the ability to add the 32nd franchise in NHL 18.

During an event at EA HQ, we got our first glimpse at how franchise mode handles adding new teams to the league. You can only add the 32nd team at the beginning of a new franchise mode, which means you have to pick from the leftovers remaining in the aftermath of the Golden Knights' expansion draft. Picking second for every position obviously puts the 32nd franchise at an extreme disadvantage, but I looked at the experience like a challenge. Could I draft a team that could compete for a playoff spot out of the gate? Watch this video to find out if I had what it takes to put a winner on the ice:

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Capcom Talks Bringing The Series To PS4 And Going After A Mainstream Audience

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Capcom Talks Bringing The Series To PS4 And Going After A Mainstream Audience

During E3, Monster Hunter: World proved to be one of the biggest surprises of the show, as the series finally makes its way back to home consoles after spending a few years on portable devices. We talked with producer Ryozo Tsujimoto and creative director Kaname Fujioka about bringing the series to PS4, making it more accessible for a wider audience, and what we can expect from Monster Hunter: World's beautiful but deadly environments.

How long has Monster Hunter World been in development?

Tsujimoto: Three and a half years.

New Trailer Covers A Lot Of Ground

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New Trailer Covers A Lot Of Ground

Metroid: Samus Returns is an enhanced remake of Metroid II, which released on the original Game Boy. However, this new 3DS version doesn't look or play like a game from the '90s.

To emphasize the various combat improvements and exploration features, Nintendo has released an overview trailer that touches on many elements. From power-ups to story elements, the video below should give you a full picture of what to expect without spoiling too much.

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