IGF And GDC Awards Are Overwhelmed By Indie Winners In 2019

about X hours ago from
IGF And GDC Awards Are Overwhelmed By Indie Winners In 2019

This year at the IGF and GDC awards, held in San Francisco at the Game Developer's Conference, showed a number of games that have achieved prominence in the mainstream over the last year, but also some surprises that the industry recognized regardless of mainstream attention. You can find the nominees below, as well as the winners in bold.

Independent Games Festival Awards

Its Paper Guy! The Haunted Island, A Frog Detective Game
After Hours
En Garde!
Levedad
Sole

The Threat Of The PlayStation Influenced Panzer Dragoon’s Development

about X hours ago from
The Threat Of The PlayStation Influenced Panzer Dragoon’s Development

Back in 1994, Sega and Sony both released new video game consoles in Japan. However, it was no secret that Sony’s PlayStation out-powered Sega’s Saturn in many ways. Even among Sega’s internal development teams, the PlayStation was a hot topic, and many development teams were worried Sony was going to eat Sega’s lunch.

During a classic postmortem on the Panzer Dragoon series at GDC, ex-Sega producer Yukio Futatsugi shared a story about how he snuck into a PlayStation developer showcase before the release of Sony’s console. Futatsugi was blown away by the 3D rendering capabilities of the PlayStation and in particular Namco’s racing game Ridge Racer.

“We rode the train home thinking, ‘What the hell are we going to do about this?’” says Futatsugi. “That’s how much we were thinking about the PlayStation at Sega.”

The Threat Of The PlayStation Influenced Panzer Dragoon’s Development

about X hours ago from
The Threat Of The PlayStation Influenced Panzer Dragoon’s Development

Back in 1994, Sega and Sony both released new video game consoles in Japan. However, it was no secret that Sony’s PlayStation outpowered Sega’s Saturn in many ways. Even among Sega’s internal development teams, the PlayStation was a hot topic, and many development teams were worried that Sony was going to eat Sega’s lunch.

During a classic postmortem on the Panzer Dragoon series at GDC, ex-Sega producer Yukio Futatsugi shared a story about how he snuck into a PlayStation developer showcase before the release of Sony’s console. Futatsugi was blown away by the 3D rendering capabilities of the PlayStation and in particular Namco’s racing game Ridge Racer.

“We rode the train home thinking, ‘What the hell are we going to do about this?’” says  Futatsugi. “That’s how much we were thinking about the PlayStation at Sega.”

Doom On Stadia's Input Lag Is Noticeable But Not Ruinous

about X hours ago from
Doom On Stadia's Input Lag Is Noticeable But Not Ruinous

When Google announced their new Stadia platform, an entirely cloud-based video game system that can be accessed from any device, there were a few immediate concerns. Chief among these is the problem of latency, an issue that has plagued cloud-based gaming in all its iterations from the days of Gaikai and OnLive to rumors of Microsoft's next consoles engaging in similar initiatives. While some genres and even some games lend themselves well to the inevitable delay between pressing a button and seeing an action performed, genres like fighting games and anything fast-paced make the problem way more noticeable.

This is why it was curious that Google decided to show off the Stadia with Doom, one of the most timing-sensitive modern shooters on the market. It was like a declaration from the tech company that they fully believe input lag is a non-factor on Stadia. The bad news is that they're wrong. The good news is that it probably won't matter after a while.

Doom and Assassin's Creed Odyssey were the two games with non-Stadia versions Google was demoing alongside a handful of tech demos. Assassin's Creed Odyssey on Stadia felt like Assassin's Creed Odyssey feels like on consoles. The game is far from instantly reactive in any of its forms, making it a perfect showcase for Google's promises of unnoticeable latency. This is not the case with Doom. Doom is noticeable.

Doom On Stadia's Input Lag Is Noticeable But Not Ruinous

about X hours ago from
Doom On Stadia's Input Lag Is Noticeable But Not Ruinous

When Google announced their new Stadia platform, an entirely cloud-based video game system that can be accessed from any device, there were a few immediate concerns. Chief among these is the problem of latency, an issue that has plagued cloud-based gaming in all its iterations from the days of Gaikai and OnLive to rumors of Microsoft's next consoles engaging in similar initiatives. While some genres and even some games lend themselves well to the inevitable delay between pressing a button and seeing an action performed, genres like fighting games and anything fast-paced make the problem way more noticeable.

This is why it was curious that Google decided to show off the Stadia with Doom, one of the most timing-sensitive modern shooters on the market. It was like a declaration from the tech company that they fully believe input lag is a non-factor on Stadia. The bad news is that they're wrong. The good news is that it probably won't matter after a while.

Doom and Assassin's Creed Odyssey were the two games with non-Stadia versions Google was demoing alongside a handful of tech demos. Assassin's Creed Odyssey on Stadia felt like Assassin's Creed Odyssey feels like on consoles. The game is far from instantly reactive in any of its forms, making it a perfect showcase for Google's promises of unnoticeable latency. This is not the case with Doom. Doom is noticeable.

Impressive Demos Show Off The Latest Capabilities Of The Unreal Engine

about X hours ago from
Impressive Demos Show Off The Latest Capabilities Of The Unreal Engine

During the annual GDC "State of Unreal" presentation, Epic Games and its partners showed off several impressive tech demos showing the latest capabilities of the Unreal Engine 4. The real-time ray tracing technology was on prominent display during the cinematic tech demo "Troll" by Goodbye Kanas and Deep Forest Films:

The "Rebirth" demo from Quixel showed off the latest advancements in photorealism. The cinematic short, which takes places on an alien planet and showcases a gorgeous landscape,  was created by only three artists. 

The "Chaos" demo demonstrated advancements in physics and destructibility coming in the Unreal Engine 4.23 update later this year. Set within the universe of Epic's VR hit Robo Recall, the video shows off large-scale destruction in an explosive fashion:

Impressive Demos Show Off The Latest Capabilities Of The Unreal Engine

about X hours ago from
Impressive Demos Show Off The Latest Capabilities Of The Unreal Engine

During the annual GDC "State of Unreal" presentation, Epic Games and its partners showed off several impressive tech demos showing the latest capabilities of the Unreal Engine 4. The real-time ray tracing technology was on prominent display during the cinematic tech demo "Troll" by Goodbye Kanas and Deep Forest Films:

The "Rebirth" demo from Quixel showed off the latest advancements in photorealism. The cinematic short, which takes places on an alien planet and showcases a gorgeous landscape,  was created by only three artists. 

The "Chaos" demo demonstrated advancements in physics and destructibility coming in the Unreal Engine 4.23 update later this year. Set within the universe of Epic's VR hit Robo Recall, the video shows off large-scale destruction in an explosive fashion:

Google's Stadia Will Support The Xbox Adaptive Controller

about X hours ago from
Google's Stadia Will Support The Xbox Adaptive Controller

Yesterday, Google revealed its foray into the world of video games with the streaming service Stadia. Shortly after the presentation, Microsoft announced that the service would support Microsoft's Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC), a peripheral initially designed for Xbox One to accommodate those with various disabilities.

Bryce Johnson, Inclusive Lead at Microsoft, confirmed the announcement on Twitter:

It is great to see @googleaccess supporting devices like the #XboxAdaptiveController in #stadia. Please consider enabling the copiloting of these devices. It will really help gamers with limited mobility a lot. #googleStadia https://t.co/NiB06a5QBb

Google's Stadia Will Support The Microsoft Xbox Adaptive Controller

about X hours ago from
Google's Stadia Will Support The Microsoft Xbox Adaptive Controller

Yesterday, Google revealed its foray into the world of video games with the streaming service Stadia. Shortly after the presentation, Microsoft announced that the service would support Microsoft's Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC), a peripheral initially designed for Xbox One to accommodate those with various disabilities.

Bryce Johnson, Inclusive Lead at Microsoft, confirmed the announcement on Twitter:

It is great to see @googleaccess supporting devices like the #XboxAdaptiveController in #stadia. Please consider enabling the copiloting of these devices. It will really help gamers with limited mobility a lot. #googleStadia https://t.co/NiB06a5QBb

Google's Stadia Will Support The Xbox Adaptive Controller

about X hours ago from
Google's Stadia Will Support The Xbox Adaptive Controller

Yesterday, Google revealed its foray into the world of video games with the streaming service Stadia. Shortly after the presentation, Microsoft announced that the service would support Microsoft's Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC), a peripheral initially designed for Xbox One to accommodate those with various disabilities.

Bryce Johnson, Inclusive Lead at Microsoft, confirmed the announcement on Twitter:

It is great to see @googleaccess supporting devices like the #XboxAdaptiveController in #stadia. Please consider enabling the copiloting of these devices. It will really help gamers with limited mobility a lot. #googleStadia https://t.co/NiB06a5QBb