DontNod Explains Reasoning For Life Is Strange 2's Schedule

about X hours ago from
DontNod Explains Reasoning For Life Is Strange 2's Schedule

Today DontNod announced the schedule for the remaining episodes of Life is Strange 2. One thing that caught fans' attention is the big gap between the fourth and final episode, which is close to fourth months. Today, I sat down with co-director Raoul Barbet and lead producer Luc Bagadhoust at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco and asked them about the schedule. Both were upfront about the challenges of developing episodic games along with the benefits they've had from fan feedback. 

"It's more complex to work on this game," Barbet said. "It may look very similar with all the interaction and what you can do. We've [made sure] everything has more impact, we've changed locations between each episode, the amount of work is more important. The idea is to do this right and not rush anything."

"It's really long already, so the idea is to do our best to be as short as possible, but we prefer to take our time when it's possible," Bagadhoust adds. "If we rush, we can't change the episode after, so the idea is really to do our best as possible."

DontNod Explains Reasoning For Life Is Strange 2's Schedule

about X hours ago from
DontNod Explains Reasoning For Life Is Strange 2's Schedule

Today DontNod announced the schedule for the remaining episodes of Life is Strange 2. One thing that caught fans' eye is the big gap between the fourth and final episode, which is close to fourth months. Today, I sat down with co-director Raoul Barbet and lead producer Luc Bagadhoust at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco and asked them about the schedule. Both were upfront about the challenges of developing episodic games along with the benefits they've had from fan feedback. 

"It's more complex to work on this game," Barbet said. "It may look very similar with all the interaction and what you can do. We've [made sure] everything has more impact, we've changed locations between each episode, the amount of work is more important. The idea is to do this right and not rush anything."

"It's really long already, so the idea is to do our best to be as short as possible, but we prefer to take our time when it's possible," Bagadhoust adds. "If we rush, we can't change the episode after, so the idea is really to do our best as possible."

Report: Walmart Might Be Working On Its Stadia Competitor

about X hours ago from
Report: Walmart Might Be Working On Its Stadia Competitor

Google dominated games industry conversation this week with its reveal of Stadia, a game-streaming platform that may lay the foundation for a console-free future (although we have some concerns). Another major corporation may soon throw its hat in the ring, though – and it's Walmart.

According to a report on USGamer, the retail giant has been chatting with game developers and publishers since earlier this year and through this week's Game Developers Conference, and that the company is exploring its own game-streaming service.

This isn't too shocking, though; Walmart has spent the past few years positioning itself as a true player in the e-commerce game. In 2016, the company acquired Jet.com, which at the time was one of the fastest-growing e-commerce sites in the U.S. Just last year, Walmart revealed a 5-year partnership with Microsoft that grants the company access to Microsoft's cloud-computing tools, in efforts to reduce operating costs and give its associates support tools in stores. It's likely this partnership has little to do with whispers of Walmart's alleged game-streaming service, but it illustrates the company's investment into cloud solutions.

Report: Walmart Might Be Working On Its Stadia Competitor

about X hours ago from
Report: Walmart Might Be Working On Its Stadia Competitor

Google dominated games industry conversation this week with its reveal of Stadia, a game-streaming platform that may lay the foundation for a console-free future (although we have some concerns). Another major corporation may soon throw its hat in the ring, though – and it's Walmart.

According to a report on USGamer, the retail giant has been chatting with game developers and publishers since earlier this year and through this week's Game Developers Conference, and that the company is exploring its own game-streaming service.

This isn't too shocking, though; Walmart has spent the past few years positioning itself as a true player in the e-commerce game. In 2016, the company acquired Jet.com, which at the time was one of the fastest-growing e-commerce sites in the U.S. Just last year, Walmart revealed a 5-year partnership with Microsoft that grants the company access to Microsoft's cloud-computing tools, in efforts to reduce operating costs and give its associates support tools in stores. It's likely this partnership has little to do with whispers of Walmart's alleged game-streaming service, but it illustrates the company's investment into cloud solutions.

Valve Plans Steam Facelift With Library Redesign, New Events Page

about X hours ago from
Valve Plans Steam Facelift With Library Redesign, New Events Page

Steam has long been in need of a facelift, and Valve is gearing up to do just that in the coming months. 

When talking to developers about their wish list of changes for the crowded digital marketplace, the most resonant chorus formed around discoverability. This led to several upcoming user interface designs meant to surface and resurface games to players.

The biggest change comes via a redesigned library page featuring advanced filters, which you can see for yourself here. 

Valve Plans Steam Facelift With Library Redesign, New Events Page

about X hours ago from
Valve Plans Steam Facelift With Library Redesign, New Events Page

Steam has long been in need of a facelift, and Valve is gearing up to do just that in the coming months. 

When talking to developers about their wish list of changes for the crowded digital marketplace, the most resonant chorus formed around discoverability. This led to several upcoming user interface designs meant to surface and resurface games to players.

The biggest change comes via a redesigned library page featuring advanced filters, which you can see for yourself here. 

Microsoft Disputes FCC's Broadband Availability Data

about X hours ago from
Microsoft Disputes FCC's Broadband Availability Data

Microsoft is publicly challenging the Federal Communications Committee's (FCC) recent broadband-availability reports. This outcry correlates with the fact that the American government's broadband-mapping philosophy has been under scrutiny for some time. According to Microsoft, the FCC's data "appears to overstate the extent to which broadband is actually available throughout the nation." The FCC currently defines broadband as 25 Mbps down and 3 Mbps up. In some areas, however, Microsoft has asserted that only a modicum of American citizens have access to this standard. 

This issue primarily stems from Form 477 data – a compilation of Internet Service Provider (or ISP) reports that are more likely to present favorable statistics to quell competitor companies. But why is Microsoft so adamant about keeping the FCC and ISPs in check? For years, the multinational corporation has been working on an ambitious initiative centered around transmitting white space broadband – a premium broadcasting channel that provides increased coverage, low power consumption, and reduced consumer costs – to underprivileged areas. "It took 50 years to electrify the nation," affirms Microsoft. "The millions of Americans waiting for broadband don't have the luxury of time." 

[Source: MediaPost via Motherboard]

Microsoft Disputes FCC's Broadband Availability Data

about X hours ago from
Microsoft Disputes FCC's Broadband Availability Data

Microsoft is publicly challenging the Federal Communications Committee's (FCC) recent broadband-availability reports. This outcry correlates with the fact that the American government's broadband-mapping philosophy has been under scrutiny for some time. According to Microsoft, the FCC's data "appears to overstate the extent to which broadband is actually available throughout the nation." The FCC currently defines broadband as 25 Mbps down and 3 Mbps up. In some areas, however, Microsoft has asserted that only a modicum of American citizens have access to this standard. 

This issue primarily stems from Form 477 data – a compilation of Internet Service Provider (or ISP) reports that are more likely to present favorable statistics to quell competitor companies. But why is Microsoft so adamant about keeping the FCC and ISPs in check? For years, the multinational corporation has been working on an ambitious initiative centered around transmitting white space broadband – a premium broadcasting channel that provides increased coverage, low power consumption, and reduced consumer costs – to underprivileged areas. "It took 50 years to electrify the nation," affirms Microsoft. "The millions of Americans waiting for broadband don't have the luxury of time." 

[Source: MediaPost via Motherboard]

Tetris Effect's Cut Modes Included A Rock Band-Style Puzzler

about X hours ago from
Tetris Effect's Cut Modes Included A Rock Band-Style Puzzler

During the Game Developer's Conference panel for Tetris Effect, the psychedelic and absorbing version of Tetris released for PlayStation 4 last year, Enhance Games producer Mark MacDonald went into a little detail about the game's cutting room floor. While the game boasts a number of modes for different takes on the Tetris formula without compromising the Tetris formula, there were a few modes that didn't quite make the cut either because they couldn't make it work or it would just take too much work.

Unfortunately, Enhance Games was very specific that we could not take pictures of or record any part of the presentation, so description will have to do.

The biggest mode that didn't make it is a Rock Band-style mode that would have let players switch between different instruments and create music using the effects from the game. So moving blocks, dropping them, etc. would create different sounds with the instrument you had selected, similarly to the way the gameplay works in concert with the music in the main game. MacDonald showed off guitar, bass guitar, drums, piano, and voice, though he explained getting voice to sound right beyond just incoherent yelling was not working right when they decided to the cut the mode. Unfortunately, this Rock Band mode would have needed as much work as a full game unto itself, so it had to be cut mainly for that reason.

Tetris Effect's Cut Modes Included A Rock Band-Style Puzzler

about X hours ago from
Tetris Effect's Cut Modes Included A Rock Band-Style Puzzler

During the Game Developer's Conference panel for Tetris Effect, the psychedelic and absorbing version of Tetris released for PlayStation 4 last year, Enhance Games producer Mark MacDonald went into a little detail about the game's cutting room floor. While the game boasts a number of modes for different takes on the Tetris formula without compromising the Tetris formula, there were a few modes that didn't quite make the cut either because they couldn't make it work or it would just take too much work.

Unfortunately, Enhance Games was very specific that we could not take pictures of or record any part of the presentation, so description will have to do.

The biggest mode that didn't make it is a Rock Band-style mode that would have let players switch between different instruments and create music using the effects from the game. So moving blocks, dropping them, etc. would create different sounds with the instrument you had selected, similarly to the way the gameplay works in concert with the music in the main game. MacDonald showed off guitar, bass guitar, drums, piano, and voice, though he explained getting voice to sound right beyond just incoherent yelling was not working right when they decided to the cut the mode. Unfortunately, this Rock Band mode would have needed as much work as a full game unto itself, so it had to be cut mainly for that reason.