Call Of Duty Website Source Code Details Black Ops 3’s ‘Dark, Twisted Future’

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Yesterday, Activision revealed the name of this year’s Call of Duty title. With Treyarch at the helm, there was much speculation that it would be the follow up to 2012’s Black Ops 2. We now know that to be accurate.

This year’s entry in the mega-franchise is Black Ops 3, which will be officially revealed on April 26. However, the source code on the official Call of Duty site reveals a bit more information about the game.

Click to enlarge.

Nintendo Discounts Pikmin 3, Mario Kart 7, Other Titles In Spring Sale

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Nintendo Discounts Pikmin 3, Mario Kart 7, Other Titles In Spring Sale

Nintendo is having a sale on its website for digital versions of some of its big titles.

The markdowns aren't huge, with most discounts being between $5 and $10, but there are definitely some very high-quality games, including Pikmin 3, Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, Mario Kart 7, Kirby: Triple Deluxe, and Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels.

Here's the complete list:

Axiom Verge Speed Run Completed In 48:51

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Axiom Verge Speed Run Completed In 48:51

Speed runner Synophis has posted an impressive time in Tom Happ's excellent Metroid throwback.

Axiom Verge was made with speed runners in mind, and it's clearly paying off. Today, Synophis posted this vidoe of a 48:51 speed run on his YouTube account. It shows great mastery of a very challenging game.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Stuck Offline? Clickhole's Internet Sim Provides The Next Best Thing

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Stuck Offline? Clickhole's Internet Sim Provides The Next Best Thing

If you're reading this, odds are you have online access and you know a thing or two about how that whole Worldwide Web thing works. In the unlikely event that you're a complete online neophyte, Clickhole is here to help with their latest Clickventure, Internet Sim.

This richly detailed choose-your-own adventure lets you explore the best that the Internet has to offer, including online games, email, videos, and more. For those of you who are new to the Internet, this is a wonderful introduction. Even the most knowledgeable among us might learn a thing or two.

What are you waiting for? Play Internet Sim already!

Reader Discussion: Are You Interested In Lego Dimensions?

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Reader Discussion: Are You Interested In Lego Dimensions?

This morning, Warner Bros. unveiled the next major entry in the toys to life genre. Lego Dimensions is set to take on Activision’s Skylanders, Disney Infinity, and Nintendo’s Amiibo figures this fall, with its own approach to the category.

Lego Dimensions comes with a base, buildable Gateway (a strictly cosmetic piece), minifigures, and a vehicle. It looks like the figures can be removed from their bases and played with. It also appears that the vehicles and accessories are built from pieces like any other set.

The construction angle gives these toys to life a bit of different spin than the other, static figures. Is the Lego angle enough to woo you to this type of game? Or are you someone that stands opposed to the blending of toys and digital games?

PSA: Humble Weekly Bundle Gets Physical With Tabletop Games

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PSA: Humble Weekly Bundle Gets Physical With Tabletop Games

This week’s bundle is focusing on digital versions of classic tabletop games, with a physical twist in honor of their roots.

The base pack, which can be bought for any price, includes digital versions of Small World 2, Magnifico and Talisman along with its Frostmarch expansion. Charitable buyers who fork over more than $7 also get 100% Orange Juice along with its Syura & Nanako character pack, Ticket to Ride, and Catan: Creator’s Edition. 

This week comes with a little extra twist, though. High-rollers who pony up $32 or more can snag some physical tabletop goodies. The Humble Tabletop Box comes with a physical game box, a set of Humble Bundle playing cards (with indie-game cameos),  Humble Bundle logo dice, a pair of black and red wooden Meeples, and the following metal game tokens:

Nintendo Service Agent Pins Blame For Amiibo Shortage Solely On Retailers

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Yesterday, Brian Shea published an opinion piece about the ways in which Nintendo is letting its fan base down. In response to that story, a reader reached out to us to share his interactions with a Nintendo customer-service representative.

A reader by the name of Brian Nelson reached out to us with a text transcript of his conversation. He begins by expressing his disappointment with the handling of the Amiibo shortage.

I would just like to express my disappointment with your handling of amiibo support, instead of taking preorders and making a supply to match, you have purposely created a shortage of characters and now games with features large amounts of players will never be able to access. Disney and activision have no problem assuring their customers get their toys to life figures.

Electronic Frontier Foundation And Entertainment Software Association Square Off Over Piracy

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Electronic Frontier Foundation And Entertainment Software Association Square Off Over Piracy

Yesterday, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) made waves on social media after posting allegations about the Entertainment Software Association (ESA). The EFF alleges that the ESA (which represents game publishers in the United States) is taking steps to curtail all preservation efforts in gaming, something that has become of greater concern as the medium ages.

Furthermore, the EFF says bluntly that the ESA is standing in the way of museums and archives seeking to preserve video game heritage. We reached out to the ESA, which provided us with the filing that prompted the EFF’s tirade.

According to the document, the EFF is seeking an exemption from section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). This piece of the law governs anti-circumvention of hardware (colloquially called “jailbreaking”). 

Ultrasound May Be The Answer To VR’s Tactile Troubles

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The conundrum of providing users physical feedback from virtual reality has seemed like a sci-fi dream for years, but British company Ultrahaptics’ new technology may change all that.

Co-developed by Professor Sriram Subramanian at the University of Bristol, the technology focuses points of ultrasound that create the sensation of touching a virtual object. The project recently received a £600,000 investment, which allowed the expansion of the number of points able to be created. More points, in turn, means greater detail for the simulated objects.

Check out the video below of the technology during development at the University of Bristol.