Replay – The 3DO Spectacular: Round 2

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Replay – The 3DO Spectacular: Round 2

Last month we took a look at a handful of 3DO games and we were so blown away that we decided to come back for a second round. And there is a good chance we will come back for a third at some point. We love it that much.

The 3DO is a strange system, but it did have some smart ideas – like the ability to daisy-chain multiple controllers for multiplayer, and the presence of a headphone jack on the controller, which is something we wouldn't see again until the Wii U in 2012. It also, for some strange reason, has more FMV games than any platform in history. I haven't done the research to back up that statement, but I feel in my heart that is true.

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New Gameplay Today – PUBG's New Miramar Map

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New Gameplay Today – PUBG's New Miramar Map

A new map is now live on PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, letting players take on 99 opponents in the Miramar desert. Dan Tack and I watched Leo Vader do his darndest to come out on top in a couple of live matches. Did he earn a chicken dinner for his trouble? Do you think we'd tell you here if he did? 

Take a look at the video below to see some of the game's new weapons (sawed-off shotguns!) and vehicles (VW van clone!) in action, set against the game's all-new desert backdrop. Plus, we take an extensive look at the killcam to see what – if anything – went wrong during Leo's playthrough. Not that anything went wrong, of course.

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Funny To A Point – Super Mario Odyssey Is 2017's Most Political Game

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Funny To A Point – Super Mario Odyssey Is 2017's Most Political Game

Let's face it, folks: 2017 has been a rough year. From politics to world events to entertainment news, watching 2017 unfold has been a bit like watching Game of Thrones – only every episode is The Red Wedding, and the scene has been going on for 12 months instead of a few gut-wrenching minutes. The worse things get, the more thankful I am for video games, which offer the occasional and much-needed respite from reality.

That's not to say that video games can't or shouldn't address important real-life issues, like warmental health, and which alien you would sex up if you were captain of the U.S.S. Hornball. It's just that every now and then it's nice to set aside the grueling choices of post-apocalyptic worlds and play something that is unabashedly fun.

Many gamers have pointed to Super Mario Odyssey as the elephant-sized suppository of joy that 2017 needed, including G.I.'s own Matt Miller, who recently made the case for naming it game of the year. After struggling to enjoy Zelda for the past few weeks, Odyssey's light-hearted romp sounded like just the ticket, so I triple-jumped right in while doing my best "Wahooooo!"

How Rainbow Six Siege Quietly Became One Of The Best Multiplayer Shooters

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How Rainbow Six Siege Quietly Became One Of The Best Multiplayer Shooters

When Rainbow Six Siege launched two years ago to mixed reviews and somewhat lackluster sales, it would have been fair for Ubisoft to write the game off. However, the team at Ubisoft Montreal wasn’t content to leave it alone. Instead, the launch was just a rocky first step in what has become a remarkable evolution for the tactical online first-person shooter.

Over the past two years Ubisoft Montreal continued to release a stream of free content, patches, updates, and player-friendly features, building up trust with its ever-expanding player base and quietly making Siege into one of the most dynamic, well-balanced, and content-rich shooters on the market. 

However, the journey to this point wasn’t easy. At one point Siege wasn’t even a twinkle in Ubisoft’s eye. Back in 2011, the studio’s next entry under the Rainbow Six banner was Rainbow Six Patriots, a more traditional project that featured both a campaign and multiplayer. The game was in development for some time (Game Informer even announced it as our cover back in 2011), but Ubisoft decided to cancel the project due to one big factor: timing.

New Gameplay Today – Zelda: Breath Of The Wild's New DLC

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New Gameplay Today – Zelda: Breath Of The Wild's New DLC

Last night, Nintendo released the second of two planned DLC updates for The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. The Champions' Ballad adds new shrines, a dungeon, and several other fun new items. It's also kind of difficult, as Suriel proves in our new episode of New Gameplay Today. Fortunately, he has the support of Kyle, Leo, and me.

Suriel shows off the opening moments of the DLC, showing how players can get a pair of items that make it easier to keep track of your equine companion. Then we jump into a shrine – after using the Champions' Ballad's new gimmick weapon, the One-Hit Obliterator. As cool as the weapon sounds, it also makes Link exceedingly vulnerable. Suriel learns this the hard way.

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Exclusive Mega Man 11 Concept Art Gallery

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Exclusive Mega Man 11 Concept Art Gallery

For Mega Man 11, Capcom is updating the Blue Bomber’s iconic design. However, the character has a 30-year history, and fans have come to expect a certain look from the Mega Man franchise. We spoke with artist Yuji Ishihara about how he gave Mega Man 11 its anime-inspired look while holding true to the series history.

On Mega Man's New Design: “We were going for more 3D look, so I felt like I should include more details to really show off that he is a robot. One of the biggest changes is the separation of the joints in the wrist and ankle. I noticed that anytime people draw fan art of Mega Man, the anatomy of drawing the hand with the entire wrist and arm was difficult. With the separation, I figured that if I’m fortunate enough to have people draw fan art of this version of Mega Man, they would have an easier time.”

New Gameplay Today – Heartstone's Kobolds And Catacombs Mode

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New Gameplay Today – Heartstone's Kobolds And Catacombs Mode

Blizzard released Hearthstone's new single-player mode Kobolds and Catacombs today, which lets players take a randomized, expanding deck on a roguelike journey. Dan Tack is a big fan of what he's played, so he took Leo Vader and me on what we thought would be a quick tour through the mode. It ended up being our longest ever episode of New Gameplay Today. Did he make it through to the end? You'll have to watch and find out.

Seriously, I'm not going to tell you whether or not he defeated the run of eight bosses, each more difficult than the last. Want to know if his selections of cards and passive abilities paid off? Seriously, I'm not going to say here. You'll have to watch the video below. Sheesh!

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Soma’s Safe Mode Proves Horror Games Can Work Without Danger

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Soma’s Safe Mode Proves Horror Games Can Work Without Danger

Horror games rely on conflict. Grotesque, bloody monsters are often front-and-center, and your relationship to them (whether it involves gunning them down with limited ammo or sneaking by them unharmed) is how horror games instill dread and fear into players. With the addition of “Safe Mode,” Soma (Amnesia: The Dark Descent developer Frictional Games’ 2015 follow-up) challenges that idea, opting to let players remove monster encounters entirely and focus on explorimg underwater station Pathos-11 at their leisure. The mode isn’t without faults, but is ultimately the way to go while also proving horror games don’t have to test players to entertain them.

Although Soma is one of my favorite games of 2015, its monsters frustrated me. Soma’s story, which raises questions about the nature of A.I., consciousness, and end-of-the-world scenarios through insightful conversations between characters, moves at a brisk pace. These conversations, their implications, and how developer Frictional Games weaves them into interactive moments not only deepen the atmosphere, but offer terrifying mental spaces for players to venture into without resorting to gore or violence. But having to crawl into vents and wait for monsters to walk by didn’t mesh with these threads, and slowed down the momentum of the plot. 

The Virtual Life – Five Relaxing Games To Play During Stressful Times

about X hours ago from
The Virtual Life – Five Relaxing Games To Play During Stressful Times

The holidays are upon us and it's great, right? Snow. Seeing family. Exchanging gifts, if you're into that sort of thing. However, there's also a load of small-time stressors that appear during these jovial times, particularly for those of us doomed to sit in airports for long hours thanks to weather delays. Here are a handful of charming, low-key games you can play to calm the nerves.

Abzû A joyful sea exploration adventure from several people who worked on Journey, Abzû  puts you in the flippers of a diver exploring a beautiful underwater world teeming with life. A beautiful and compact adventure, Abzû  won us over, with reviewer Matthew Kato saying "Abzû is a game of mysteries and its world will move you to muse the beauty of life and our place in it. It contains moments that transcend the simple act of playing a video game by making a connection with the beings around you – a profound experience."
Platforms: PS4, Xbox One, PC
Check it out if: The sea is your thing. You love beautiful art.