Is Cloud-Based Streaming Video Games’ Future?

about X hours ago from
Is Cloud-Based Streaming Video Games’ Future?

This week Google announced Stadia, a cloud-based streaming service that allows you to play the latest triple-A video games at the highest quality on almost any device you have – be it your phone or a relatively old computer. Being able to stream video games like we do movies and television shows seems like the logical next step for video games. Stadia does away with the need to download software, update it, and all you have to do is click “play.” It’s convenient and appears to be hassle free. I love the idea of Stadia, but will it actually work?

Google’s vision isn’t new by any stretch of the imagination. We got our first real glimpse of a streaming future over a decade ago through OnLive (which Sony purchased), and then Gaikai (which Sony also purchased), and we can actually experience it today through PlayStation Now, GeForce Now, and a handful of other services that likely have “Now” in the name.

I Like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice More Than Soulsborne (For Now)

about X hours ago from
I Like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice More Than Soulsborne (For Now)

I am a strange fan of From Software’s internet-designated "Soulsborne" games. Most players are either super fans who have played each of the games multiple times, or they’re someone who gave up quickly and never looked back (which is a perfectly reasonable reaction). I am an anomaly in that I think they’re… okay. I beat Dark Souls II and III, played about half of Bloodborne and about half of Dark Souls on Switch. I love the atmosphere, exploration, and level design of these games, but I’ve never loved the methodical combat, and the bosses have always felt like cool-looking brick walls that hold me back from getting to do the thing I want to do – explore and find secrets. I am admittedly early in Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice so I haven’t hit the colossal difficulty curve I know is just on the horizon, but it makes a very good first impression.

I Like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice More Than Soulsborne (For Now)

about X hours ago from
I Like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice More Than Soulsborne (For Now)

I am a strange fan of From Software’s internet-designated "Soulsborne" games. Most players are either super fans who have played each of the games multiple times, or they’re someone who gave up quickly and never looked back (which is a perfectly reasonable reaction). I am an anomaly in that I think they’re… okay. I beat Dark Souls II and III, played about half of Bloodborne and about half of Dark Souls on Switch. I love the atmosphere, exploration, and level design of these games, but I’ve never loved the methodical combat, and the bosses have always felt like cool-looking brick walls that hold me back from getting to do the thing I want to do – explore and find secrets. I am admittedly early in Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice so I haven’t hit the colossal difficulty curve I know is just on the horizon, but it makes a very good first impression.

The Best Indie Games of GDC 2019

about X hours ago from
The Best Indie Games of GDC 2019

Every year, many of the best and brightest minds in video games converge in San Francisco to attend the Game Developers Conference. Many of them bring along brand new games ready for their moment in the spotlight. From the large GDC Play area and the Indie Megabooth to specially curated showcases hosted by Nintendo and Microsoft, there is no shortage of exciting titles.

Here is an evolving list of the coolest and most interesting indie games the Game Informer crew saw at the conference. Come back each day, as we plan to continually update this list with more promising titles throughout the show.

Games are listed alphabetically.

The Best Indie Games of GDC 2019

about X hours ago from
The Best Indie Games of GDC 2019

Every year, many of the best and brightest minds in video games converge in San Francisco to attend the Game Developers Conference. Many of them bring along brand new games ready for their moment in the spotlight. From the large GDC Play area and the Indie Megabooth to specially curated showcases hosted by Nintendo and Microsoft, there is no shortage of exciting titles.

Here is an evolving list of the coolest and most interesting indie games the Game Informer crew saw at the conference. Come back each day, as we plan to continually update this list with more promising titles throughout the show.

Games are listed alphabetically.

Nintendo And Cuphead Creator On Growing Relationship With Microsoft

about X hours ago from
Nintendo And Cuphead Creator On Growing Relationship With Microsoft

During GDC 2019, we spoke with Nintendo's manager of publisher and developer relations Kirk Scott, Nintendo's product marketing specialist Vincent Chon, and Cuphead co-creator Jared Moldenhauer about how badly Moldenhauer wants the character in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate and also how the port of the Microsoft-exclusive platformer happened to begin with.

So how did this happen? Take me back to the beginning of Cuphead being ported to the Switch?

Kirk Scott: We’re always trying to get the best content on the platform. So it’s organic, like "Hey, this would be a great idea." Then somebody at Microsoft says, "Hey we think this would be a great idea too." Then they talk to those guys and it just happens.

Nintendo And Cuphead Creator On Growing Relationship With Microsoft

about X hours ago from
Nintendo And Cuphead Creator On Growing Relationship With Microsoft

During GDC 2019, we spoke with Nintendo's manager of publisher and developer relations Kirk Scott, Nintendo's product marketing specialist Vincent Chon, and Cuphead co-creator Jared Moldenhauer about how badly Moldenhauer wants the character in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate and also how the port of the Microsoft-exclusive platformer happened to begin with.

So how did this happen? Take me back to the beginning of Cuphead being ported to the Switch?

Kirk Scott: We’re always trying to get the best content on the platform. So it’s organic, like "Hey, this would be a great idea." Then somebody at Microsoft says, "Hey we think this would be a great idea too." Then they talk to those guys and it just happens.

A Squirrel Can Murder You In The Red Lantern, A Dog Mushing Game On Nintendo Switch

about X hours ago from
A Squirrel Can Murder You In The Red Lantern, A Dog Mushing Game On Nintendo Switch

While at GDC 2019, we got a chance to speak with The Red Latern game director Lindsey Rostal from Timberline Games about the narrative-survival game coming to the Nintendo Switch in the summer of 2019. “It was a pretty great way to unveil something that I've been toiling away on in the dark... of Los Angeles," Rostal says about appearing in the latest Nintendo Showcase. The game tasks players with journeying with your dog sled team across a (procedurally-generated) harsh Alaskan landscape, where you get lost while training for your first Iditarod race.

“We have a strong narrative background," Rostal says of Timberline Games. "I’ve made branching games and I wanted to find a new way to have a more dynamic narrative. Something that worked more in a streaming context and for a larger variety of audiences." You aren't racing in the game, you're struggling to survive against the wildnerness. Due to the randomization of the game's elements, your runs through the game vary wildly, but you can definitely get lucky.

A Squirrel Can Murder You In The Red Lantern, A Dog Mushing Game On Nintendo Switch

about X hours ago from
A Squirrel Can Murder You In The Red Lantern, A Dog Mushing Game On Nintendo Switch

While at GDC 2019, we got a chance to speak with The Red Latern game director Lindsey Rostal from Timberline Games about the narrative-survival game coming to the Nintendo Switch in the summer of 2019. “It was a pretty great way to unveil something that I've been toiling away on in the dark... of Los Angeles," Rostal says about appearing in the latest Nintendo Showcase. The game tasks players with journeying with your dog sled team across a (procedurally-generated) harsh Alaskan landscape, where you get lost while training for your first Iditarod race.

“We have a strong narrative background," Rostal says of Timberline Games. "I’ve made branching games and I wanted to find a new way to have a more dynamic narrative. Something that worked more in a streaming context and for a larger variety of audiences." You aren't racing in the game, you're struggling to survive against the wildnerness. Due to the randomization of the game's elements, your runs through the game vary wildly, but you can definitely get lucky.

A Squirrel Can Murder You In The Red Lantern, A Dog Mushing On Nintendo Switch

about X hours ago from
A Squirrel Can Murder You In The Red Lantern, A Dog Mushing On Nintendo Switch

While at GDC 2019, we got a chance to speak with The Red Latern game director Lindsey Rostal from Timberline Games about the narrative-survival game coming to the Nintendo Switch in the summer of 2019. “It was a pretty great way to unveil something that I've been toiling away on in the dark... of Los Angeles," Rostal says about appearing in the latest Nintendo Showcase. The game tasks players with journeying with your dog sled team across a (procedurally-generated) harsh Alaskan landscape, where you get lost while training for your first Iditarod race.

“We have a strong narrative background," Rostal says of Timberline Games. "I’ve made branching games and I wanted to find a new way to have a more dynamic narrative. Something that worked more in a streaming context and for a larger variety of audiences." You aren't racing in the game, you're struggling to survive against the wildnerness. Due to the randomization of the game's elements, your runs through the game vary wildly, but you can definitely get lucky.