How Remedy Is Approaching Side Missions In Control

about X hours ago from
How Remedy Is Approaching Side Missions In Control

Remedy Entertainment has garnered a reputation for engaging storytelling through guided, linear experiences thanks to standout titles like Max Payne, Alan Wake, and Quantum Break. However, Control looks to smash preconceived notions about the projects the studio works on by delivering a more open-ended experience. One way Remedy is hammering home this idea of encouraged exploration is through optional side missions that players can choose to engage with or ignore altogether. These missions not only give you new, unique gameplay to explore, but you’re also able to glean more information about Jesse, The Oldest House, the Federal Bureau of Control, and the Hiss.

Control is a game based in the unexpected and unexplainable, so you can expect many mysteries during your journey through The Oldest House. The nonlinear format of the game let Remedy experiment more with side content for those who truly want to learn all they can about the supernatural entities and mysteries of Control’s world.

According to game director Mikael Kasurinen, when developing past games, Remedy has typically looked for an exciting 30-second loop of action, then attempted to recreate that experience throughout the entire game. The team is taking a vastly different approach with Control.

How Remedy Is Approaching Side Missions In Control

about X hours ago from
How Remedy Is Approaching Side Missions In Control

Remedy Entertainment has garnered a reputation for engaging storytelling through guided, linear experiences thanks to standout titles like Max Payne, Alan Wake, and Quantum Break. However, Control looks to smash preconceived notions about the projects the studio works on by delivering a more open-ended experience. One way Remedy is hammering home this idea of encouraged exploration is through optional side missions that players can choose to engage with or ignore altogether. These missions not only give you new, unique gameplay to explore, but you’re also able to glean more information about Jesse, The Oldest House, the Federal Bureau of Control, and the Hiss.

Control is a game based in the unexpected and unexplainable, so you can expect many mysteries during your journey through The Oldest House. The nonlinear format of the game let Remedy experiment more with side content for those who truly want to learn all they can about the supernatural entities and mysteries of Control’s world.

According to game director Mikael Kasurinen, when developing past games, Remedy has typically looked for an exciting 30-second loop of action, then attempted to recreate that experience throughout the entire game. The team is taking a vastly different approach with Control.

Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Spoiler-Filled Tips

about X hours ago from
Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Spoiler-Filled Tips

Sekiro is a difficult game, with tons of secrets and strategies. These tips can help you get the edge on an impossible boss or give you guidance on unlocking some of the game’s hidden mysteries. I warn you that reading these will rob you of much of the game’s enjoyment and discovery, so use them sparingly if at all. I DO NOT ADVISE READING THIS. I’ve picked some points that may give you stumbling blocks to address, but these are by no means comprehensive – there’s a lot to do and explore in Sekiro! I am also going to avoid anything in the end game and some other tidbits that are just too spoilery to speak about.


Chained Ogre: Fire. Kill it with fire. It’s in Hirata Estates located at a campfire to the right of the first sculptor past the gate.


The Drunk: Hirata Estates has a miniboss that can be a lot to handle, especially with his little army. Here’s what you do. Stealth in, kill some minions, reset the encounter, kill some more minions, jam your sword into the tanked fat man’s back and then trigger the NPC nearby and use him as a punching bag while you whale on his last node of life. No problem! This tactic can be applied to many minibosses.

Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Spoiler-Filled Tips

about X hours ago from
Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Spoiler-Filled Tips

Sekiro is a difficult game, with tons of secrets and strategies. These tips can help you get the edge on an impossible boss or give you guidance on unlocking some of the game’s hidden mysteries. I warn you that reading these will rob you of much of the game’s enjoyment and discovery, so use them sparingly if at all. I DO NOT ADVISE READING THIS. I’ve picked some points that may give you stumbling blocks to address, but these are by no means comprehensive – there’s a lot to do and explore in Sekiro! I am also going to avoid anything in the end game and some other tidbits that are just too spoilery to speak about.


Chained Ogre: Fire. Kill it with fire. It’s in Hirata Estates located at a campfire to the right of the first sculptor past the gate.


The Drunk: Hirata Estates has a miniboss that can be a lot to handle, especially with his little army. Here’s what you do. Stealth in, kill some minions, reset the encounter, kill some more minions, jam your sword into the tanked fat man’s back and then trigger the NPC nearby and use him as a punching bag while you whale on his last node of life. No problem! This tactic can be applied to many minibosses.

Phil Harrison Answers (Some Of) The Hot Questions About Stadia

about X hours ago from
Phil Harrison Answers (Some Of) The Hot Questions About Stadia

Announced two days ago at the keynote address, the Google Stadia streaming platform is the talk of the 2019 Game Developer's Conference. Both optimists and pessimists have hot takes on the viability of a service that ditches the need to buy a physical piece of hardware and instead jacks gamers directly into a cloud server. To learn more about how Google plans to address potential roadblocks like latency, data cap overage rates, and building a strong first-party library of video games, we spoke with VP Phil Harrison.

Let's talk about the name and the logo. What made you decide Stadia was the right name? And what was the meaning behind that name choice?

I think it's a perfect name. It was the culmination of a huge amount of creative work by various teams. Naming things is unbelievably hard, because you come up with a name. Then somebody else has it. Or you come up with the name, and it means something weird and a different country. There's a lot of impediments to landing on a great name.

Phil Harrison Answers (Some Of) The Hot Questions About Stadia

about X hours ago from
Phil Harrison Answers (Some Of) The Hot Questions About Stadia

Announced two days ago at the keynote address, the Google Stadia streaming platform is the talk of the 2019 Game Developer's Conference. Both optimists and pessimists have hot takes on the viability of a service that ditches the need to buy a physical piece of hardware and instead jacks gamers directly into a cloud server. To learn more about how Google plans to address potential roadblocks like latency, data cap overage rates, and building a strong first-party library of video games, we spoke with VP Phil Harrison.

Let's talk about the name and the logo. What made you decide Stadia was the right name? And what was the meaning behind that name choice?

I think it's a perfect name. It was the culmination of a huge amount of creative work by various teams. Naming things is unbelievably hard, because you come up with a name. Then somebody else has it. Or you come up with the name, and it means something weird and a different country. There's a lot of impediments to landing on a great name.

Is Cloud-Based Streaming Video Games’ Future?

about X hours ago from
Is Cloud-Based Streaming Video Games’ Future?

This week Google announced Stadia, a cloud-based streaming service that allows you to play the latest triple-A video games at the highest quality on almost any device you have – be it your phone or a relatively old computer. Being able to stream video games like we do movies and television shows seems like the logical next step for video games. Stadia does away with the need to download software, update it, and all you have to do is click “play.” It’s convenient and appears to be hassle free. I love the idea of Stadia, but will it actually work?

Google’s vision isn’t new by any stretch of the imagination. We got our first real glimpse of a streaming future over a decade ago through OnLive (which Sony purchased), and then Gaikai (which Sony also purchased), and we can actually experience it today through PlayStation Now, GeForce Now, and a handful of other services that likely have “Now” in the name.

Is Cloud-Based Streaming Video Games’ Future?

about X hours ago from
Is Cloud-Based Streaming Video Games’ Future?

This week Google announced Stadia, a cloud-based streaming service that allows you to play the latest triple-A video games at the highest quality on almost any device you have – be it your phone or a relatively old computer. Being able to stream video games like we do movies and television shows seems like the logical next step for video games. Stadia does away with the need to download software, update it, and all you have to do is click “play.” It’s convenient and appears to be hassle free. I love the idea of Stadia, but will it actually work?

Google’s vision isn’t new by any stretch of the imagination. We got our first real glimpse of a streaming future over a decade ago through OnLive (which Sony purchased), and then Gaikai (which Sony also purchased), and we can actually experience it today through PlayStation Now, GeForce Now, and a handful of other services that likely have “Now” in the name.

I Like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice More Than Soulsborne (For Now)

about X hours ago from
I Like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice More Than Soulsborne (For Now)

I am a strange fan of From Software’s internet-designated "Soulsborne" games. Most players are either super fans who have played each of the games multiple times, or they’re someone who gave up quickly and never looked back (which is a perfectly reasonable reaction). I am an anomaly in that I think they’re… okay. I beat Dark Souls II and III, played about half of Bloodborne and about half of Dark Souls on Switch. I love the atmosphere, exploration, and level design of these games, but I’ve never loved the methodical combat, and the bosses have always felt like cool-looking brick walls that hold me back from getting to do the thing I want to do – explore and find secrets. I am admittedly early in Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice so I haven’t hit the colossal difficulty curve I know is just on the horizon, but it makes a very good first impression.

I Like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice More Than Soulsborne (For Now)

about X hours ago from
I Like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice More Than Soulsborne (For Now)

I am a strange fan of From Software’s internet-designated "Soulsborne" games. Most players are either super fans who have played each of the games multiple times, or they’re someone who gave up quickly and never looked back (which is a perfectly reasonable reaction). I am an anomaly in that I think they’re… okay. I beat Dark Souls II and III, played about half of Bloodborne and about half of Dark Souls on Switch. I love the atmosphere, exploration, and level design of these games, but I’ve never loved the methodical combat, and the bosses have always felt like cool-looking brick walls that hold me back from getting to do the thing I want to do – explore and find secrets. I am admittedly early in Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice so I haven’t hit the colossal difficulty curve I know is just on the horizon, but it makes a very good first impression.