Test Chamber – Mario Kart 8

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Mario Kart 8

We're a couple weeks away from one of the biggest Wii U games to date, and Nintendo fans should definitely be looking forward to Mario Kart 8. Here at the office, we've had a blast racing each other in the game's 32 courses. We wanted to show you a sneak peek of what the game is like, so we recorded a couple races for this episode of Test Chamber.

Click below to watch Bryan Vore and I show off one single player race and one two-player race.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Test Chamber – Mario Kart 8

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Mario Kart 8

We're a couple weeks away from one of the biggest Wii U games to date, and Nintendo fans should definitely be looking forward to Mario Kart 8. Here at the office, we've had a blast racing each other in the game's 32 courses. We wanted to show you a sneak peek of what the game is like, so we recorded a couple races for this episode of Test Chamber.

Click below to watch Bryan Vore and I show off one single player race and one two-player race.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Sledgehammer Talks Canceled Third-Person Call Of Duty

about X hours ago from
Sledgehammer Talks Canceled Third-Person Call Of Duty

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare is the first game being created entirely by Activision’s newest studio in the development rotation, Sledgehammer Games. Prior to Advanced Warfare, Sledgehammer helped Infinity Ward complete Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 during the sibling studio’s public turmoil. But even before Modern Warfare 3, Sledgehammer was working within the franchise with a spin-off third-person action-adventure set in the Vietnam War. During our trip to Sledgehammer Games, studio founders Glen Schofield and Michael Condrey opened up about the canceled project.

Schofield and Condrey joined Activision and founded Sledgehammer in 2009 after successfully launching the Dead Space series at Visceral Games. More Visceral developers gradually migrated to Sledgehammer, and the team began work on a new entry in the Call of Duty franchise that would shake up the tried and true first-person formula. 

“We had spent at least six to eight months on it,” Schofield says. “I was really getting into the story. We had some really cool mechanics.”

Sledgehammer Talks Canceled Third-Person Call Of Duty

about X hours ago from
Sledgehammer Talks Canceled Third-Person Call Of Duty

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare is the first game being created entirely by Activision’s newest studio in the development rotation, Sledgehammer Games. Prior to Advanced Warfare, Sledgehammer helped Infinity Ward complete Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 during the sibling studio’s public turmoil. But even before Modern Warfare 3, Sledgehammer was working within the franchise with a spin-off third-person action-adventure set in the Vietnam War. During our trip to Sledgehammer Games, studio founders Glen Schofield and Michael Condrey opened up about the canceled project.

Schofield and Condrey joined Activision and founded Sledgehammer in 2009 after successfully launching the Dead Space series at Visceral Games. More Visceral developers gradually migrated to Sledgehammer, and the team began work on a new entry in the Call of Duty franchise that would shake up the tried and true first-person formula. 

“We had spent at least six to eight months on it,” Schofield says. “I was really getting into the story. We had some really cool mechanics.”

Opinion – E3 Is A Crossroads For PlayStation Vita

about X hours ago from
Opinion – E3 Is A Crossroads For PlayStation Vita

Every three months, we get a brain dump of financial data from most publishers. We see what’s done well, and what might have underperformed. What isn’t said is often just as telling as what publishers put in the spotlight.

Sony released its troubling year-end financials today, and as you might expect, PlayStation 4 and PlayStation 3 were both mentioned. However, there wasn’t a single nod toward Vita, VitaTV, or the software for that platform.

It’s not good when a system underperforms, but it’s worse when the company doesn’t even mention it. Vita has been kept alive by a steady stream of niche titles and indies, but Sony hasn’t even bothered to make the case for owning one recently.

Opinion – E3 Is A Crossroads For PlayStation Vita

about X hours ago from
Opinion – E3 Is A Crossroads For PlayStation Vita

Every three months, we get a brain dump of financial data from most publishers. We see what’s done well, and what might have underperformed. What isn’t said is often just as telling as what publishers put in the spotlight.

Sony released its troubling year-end financials today, and as you might expect, PlayStation 4 and PlayStation 3 were both mentioned. However, there wasn’t a single nod toward Vita, VitaTV, or the software for that platform.

It’s not good when a system underperforms, but it’s worse when the company doesn’t even mention it. Vita has been kept alive by a steady stream of niche titles and indies, but Sony hasn’t even bothered to make the case for owning one recently.

Test Chamber – Super Time Force

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Super Time Force

No point in Earth's timeline is safe from Capybara Games' (Superbrothers: Swords & Sworcery EP, Below)  new adventure. Super Time Force is a downloadable, 2D adventure that encourages players to die, rewind time, and play alongside their fallen comrades. We downloaded it onto an Xbox One and tested out the mind-bending, time-manipulating action for ourselves.

Join Andrew Reiner and myself as we travel back to the time of dinosaurs and the not-so-distant past of 199X.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Test Chamber – Super Time Force

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Super Time Force

No point in Earth's timeline is safe from Capybara Games' (Superbrothers: Swords & Sworcery EP, Below)  new adventure. Super Time Force is a downloadable, 2D adventure that encourages players to die, rewind time, and play alongside their fallen comrades. We downloaded it onto an Xbox One and tested out the mind-bending, time-manipulating action for ourselves.

Join Andrew Reiner and myself as we travel back to the time of dinosaurs and the not-so-distant past of 199X.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Top 10 Indispensable Android Apps

about X hours ago from
Top 10 Indispensable Android Apps

For my money, smartphones are one of the greatest innovations from the past few decades. No matter where I am, I have access to a camera, audio recorder, video and audio player, digital notebook and more. Even if it doesn't exactly fit in my pocket (I own a comically oversized Samsung Note 3), it's easy to take with me wherever I go. I play games on it, too, but I use my phone as a productivity tool more than anything. I've used Android devices for years, and here are some of the apps that are among the first things I install whenever I upgrade or start fresh on a new phone.

Action LauncherOne of the best things about the Android environment is the degree of flexibility and customization that is available to users. One of the easiest ways to take control of your phone is by installing a different launcher. These essentially change the way your device's UI looks and feels. I've used several, including Nova Launcher and the still-in-beta Aviate, but I keep coming back to Action Launcher (above). I like its app index and customizable drawer, which can be accessed by swiping from either side of the screen. It also supports shutters and covers, which allow you to access multiple apps with a single icon, based on gestures and taps. It's fast, clean, and simple, which is all I need in a launcher (sorry, Touchwiz).

Top 10 Indispensable Android Apps

about X hours ago from
Top 10 Indispensable Android Apps

For my money, smartphones are one of the greatest innovations from the past few decades. No matter where I am, I have access to a camera, audio recorder, video and audio player, digital notebook and more. Even if it doesn't exactly fit in my pocket (I own a comically oversized Samsung Note 3), it's easy to take with me wherever I go. I play games on it, too, but I use my phone as a productivity tool more than anything. I've used Android devices for years, and here are some of the apps that are among the first things I install whenever I upgrade or start fresh on a new phone.

Action LauncherOne of the best things about the Android environment is the degree of flexibility and customization that is available to users. One of the easiest ways to take control of your phone is by installing a different launcher. These essentially change the way your device's UI looks and feels. I've used several, including Nova Launcher and the still-in-beta Aviate, but I keep coming back to Action Launcher (above). I like its app index and customizable drawer, which can be accessed by swiping from either side of the screen. It also supports shutters and covers, which allow you to access multiple apps with a single icon, based on gestures and taps. It's fast, clean, and simple, which is all I need in a launcher (sorry, Touchwiz).