Five Reasons Why We Want An Amplitude Revival

about X hours ago from
Five Reasons Why We Want An Amplitude Revival

With a shorter Kickstarter campaign than normal and a hefty target goal, Amplitude is one Kickstarter that is likely to come down to the wire. As of this writing, the revival of Harmonix’s excellent music game is still over $100,000 away from its $775,000 goal, with less than two days remaining to gather funds.

Many Game Informer editors (this writer included) are big fans of Amplitude, and we’re rooting for a success for Harmonix. Wondering what all the fuss is about? Here are five reasons to be excited about the potential – we’ll leave it up to you to decide if it’s worth your money. 

Precision Gameplay

The Secrets Behind Call Of Duty: Advanced Warfare's Audio

about X hours ago from

There's a lot to absorb from the gameplay of Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare, but one of the key things that stood out when we saw the game in action for our June cover story was the audio. Audio director Don Veca created the lauded soundscape of the first Dead Space and is now bringing his talents to Sledgehammer Games' first wholly developed game. Veca and his audio team have thrown out all sounds from previous Call of Duty games and are creating their grounded take on the future from scratch. Alongside the focused sounds of gunfire, the game is scored by Audiomachine (known for scoring Hollywood trailers) and also marks the return of Harry Gregon-Williams for the first time since the original Modern Warfare.

Watch the video below to learn more about Veca's work on Dead Space, what he thinks of his audio competition in the shooter market, and to hear sounds from Advanced Warfare, .

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Test Chamber – Transistor

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Transistor

It's been a long wait for a new game from Supergiant Games. Andrew Reiner and I sat down today for a brief look at Transistor, the latest release from the creators of Bastion, which released today on PS4 and PC after much anticipation. The video offers a glimpse at the broad variety of powers that players can look forward to unlocking for their character, as well as a boss fight that shows up partway through the game. 

After watching the video below, you can read my review of Transistor to make up your mind about your own purchase. 

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Test Chamber – Wolfenstein: The New Order

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Test Chamber – Wolfenstein: The New Order

Wolfenstein: The New Order is out now for just about every modern console, and we posted our mostly positive review earlier today. It does a great job of delivering the Nazi-slaughter that B.J. Blazkowicz has been dealing out for decades, and it's worth checking out for fans of the series or FPS in general.

You can get a glimpse of the game's stealth mechanics, general gunplay, and a bigger encounter below in our new episode of Test Chamber.

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From Dead Space To Call Of Duty - Sledgehammer Games' Early Days

about X hours ago from
From Dead Space To Call Of Duty - Sledgehammer Games' Early Days

In 2009, Sledgehammer co-founders Michael Condrey and Glen Schofield transitioned from Electronic Arts' Visceral Games (former EA Redwood Shores) to working for Activision with the understanding they would work on a third-person Call of Duty game (learn more about it here). While at EA, the pair created Dead Space and rebranded the studio to the skull-emblazoned Visceral Games. After the ink dried on a new contract with Activision, they went from managing 400 developers on the main campus of EA to sitting in a car planning their next move.

"We're sitting in the car going like, 'Wow, what do we do? Who is going to come with us? What's the name of the place? How are we going to get a facility?'" recalls Condrey.

"It was two of us with a vision for a different way to develop and the opportunity to start the studio we wanted with the culture and development methodologies and the design vision and marry that with Call of Duty," Condrey says.

Five Effective Video Game Teaser Images

about X hours ago from
Five Effective Video Game Teaser Images

Recently, the creator of Flappy Bird tweeted out an image from his new game. It was a tease for what's to come and it got me thinking about still image teasers of the past that worked to get me excited about upcoming games.

Final Fantasy XIIFollowing the release of Final Fantasy X and armed with the knowledge that Final Fantasy XI would not be a traditional single-player Final Fantasy game, Square Enix released the image above. It gave us a good look at the world and its visual direction, but in terms of story and character, there were very few assumptions that could be made. This image was all we knew about Final Fantasy XII for quite some time, and it led to some enjoyable speculation.

The Legend of Zelda: Skyward SwordA year before Nintnendo officially unveiled Skyward Sword, it released the image you see above. It's a straightforward image showcasing Link, who nobody doubted would appear in the game, but it left enough room open for interpretation. Where was Link's sword, and who is this blue creature standing behind him? It did a good job at opening the door for questions and revealing an art direction, but not at the cost of showing too much about the game too early.

Five Effective Video Game Teaser Images

about X hours ago from
Five Effective Video Game Teaser Images

Recently, the creator of Flappy Bird tweeted out an image from his new game. It was a tease for what's to come and it got me thinking about still image teasers of the past that worked to get me excited about upcoming games.

Final Fantasy XIIFollowing the release of Final Fantasy X and armed with the knowledge that Final Fantasy XI would not be a traditional single-player Final Fantasy game, Square Enix released the image above. It gave us a good look at the world and its visual direction, but in terms of story and character, there were very few assumptions that could be made. This image was all we knew about Final Fantasy XII for quite some time, and it led to some enjoyable speculation.

The Legend of Zelda: Skyward SwordA year before Nintnendo officially unveiled Skyward Sword, it released the image you see above. It's a straightforward image showcasing Link, who nobody doubted would appear in the game, but it left enough room open for interpretation. Where was Link's sword, and who is this blue creature standing behind him? It did a good job at opening the door for questions and revealing an art direction, but not at the cost of showing too much about the game too early.

Replay – Castlevania: Legacy Of Darkness

about X hours ago from

A few years back, Replay fans watched in horror as Tim Turi, Game Informer's resident Dracula enthusiast, struggled mightily to play Castlevania 64, a game he remembered fondly from his childhood. Today, we're hoping to destroy another one of Tim's memories with a deep dive into Castlevania: Legacy of Darkness, another game that he played the hell out of in his prepubescent years.

Released exclusively for Nintendo 64 on November 30, 1999, Legacy of Darkness takes place eight years before the events in Castlevania 64, and is seen through the eyes of a peculiar lead: a werewolf named Cornell. His adventure gets off to a hell of a start. We work our way through a village engulfed in flames and overrun with dreaded rooftop skeletons, and come across a familiar (giant) foe who we end up battling far too many times thanks to Tim's ability to die practically everywhere in the game.

Our second game is deserving of its own Replay episode, but we really couldn't think of another game with a boat that doesn't sink. Enjoy the show, folks! We'll see you next Saturday for another episode.

Replay – Castlevania: Legacy Of Darkness

about X hours ago from
Replay – Castlevania: Legacy Of Darkness

A few years back, Replay fans watched in horror as Tim Turi, Game Informer's resident Dracula enthusiast, struggled mightily to play Castlevania 64, a game he remembered fondly from his childhood. Today, we're hoping to destroy another one of Tim's memories with a deep dive into Castlevania: Legacy of Darkness, another game that he played the hell out of in his prepubescent years.

Released exclusively for Nintendo 64 on November 30, 1999, Legacy of Darkness takes place eight years before the events in Castlevania 64, and is seen through the eyes of a peculiar lead: a werewolf named Cornell. His adventure gets off to a hell of a start. We work our way through a village engulfed in flames and overrun with dreaded rooftop skeletons, and come across a familiar (giant) foe who we end up battling far too many times thanks to Tim's ability to die practically everywhere.

Our second game is deserving of its own Replay episode, but we really couldn't think of another game with a boat that doesn't sink. Enjoy the show, folks! We'll see you next Saturday for another episode.