The Wolf Among Us From The Outside – Part IV

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Telltale recently released the fifth and final episode for The Wolf Among Us. This weekend, as part of a continued experiment, I sat down with my wife and watched as she played through it. We’ve done so with previous installments (you can read the results here, here, and here), and I was looking forward to seeing how both the game and our shared experience would end.

Spoiler Warning: I’ll be discussing the plot and other game details in this post

The fourth episode came out during a busy time in our household, landing between various work trips, family visits, and other activities. For the first time, we rolled from one episode directly into the next. My big question was simple: Had she been wondering about what Bigby and the rest of the fables were up to? As it turns out, the answer was a big, fat nope.

Test Chamber – Abyss Odyssey

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Test Chamber – Abyss Odyssey

ACE Team and Atlus have brought us Abyss Odyssey, a 2D platformer meshing together fighter, roguelite, and RPG elements. Players descend through the ever-shifting Abyss to find the Warlock causing the collapse of civilization.

Join Daniel Tack and Tim Turi as they play some co-op through an early part of Abyss Odyssey and discover terrifying and bizarre enemies, beautiful and deadly backdrops, weird apparitions in sombreros, treasure, keys, and traps, and bird people. Always make sure to watch out for the bird people.

For an added bonus, stick around to see Daniel and Tim duke it out in the game's vs mode, which supports up to 4 player brawling action.

Five Licensed Famicom Games That Never Released On NES

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On July 15, 1983, Nintendo released the Famicom in Japan. Though the console itself eventually made its way to North America (as the Nintendo Entertainment System), not every game released in both territories. To celebrate the 31st birthday of the history-making system, we’ve put together a list of five licensed games that were exclusive to the Famicom. It would be easy to fill out the list with licenses that originated in Japan, like Dragonball, Ultraman, and Akira. However, we've decided to focus on licenses that would have (theoretically) had an audience stateside.

1. The Goonies This is why we got The Goonies II here on NES, despite the lack of a film called The Goonies II. This first installment follows Mikey as he hops through stages inspired by the film. It’s not all just about avoiding enemies and landing jumps; players need to collect keys and free trapped Goonies in order to advance to the final level.

2. King Kong 2: Ikari no Megaton Punch

Donkey Kong may be gaming’s most famous giant ape, but King Kong is the original. This game is supposedly connected to King Kong Lives!, the 1986 sequel to the classic monster movie. However, it has more in common with The Legend of Zelda than any movie, with a top-down perspective, a mix of exploration and combat, and hidden dungeons.

Right When You Think It's Over: Gaming's Best Fake-Out Endings

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Plenty of video game stories are predictable from beginning to end, so it's satisfying when developers try to shake things up a bit. In this feature, we take a look at points in games when you think the story is over - but there may be some more twists in store.

Note: Spoilers follow for Red Dead Redemption, Ghosts 'n Goblins, The Binding of Isaac, Dragon's Dogma, Dead Space 2, Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, Resident Evil 2, and Dead Rising.

Red Dead Redemption

Total Recall: Assassin’s Creed Announcement Trailers

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Earlier today, Ubisoft delivered a new trailer for the sixth major Assassin’s Creed game. The franchise has grown and matured quite a bit since it was first announced, so we thought we’d look back at how Ubisoft has evolved its unveilings of new series entries.

Assassin’s CreedAnnounced: E3 2006Released: November 13, 2007 (PS3, Xbox 360), April 8, 2008 (PC)

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Opinion: Don't Say The M-Word

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There's a new four-letter word in the industry that has some players denouncing developers and publishers and avoiding games like they've been afflicted with some kind of leprous plague. Like other maligned buzzwords before it, if you're dismissing a game out of hand because of a single term, you're only hurting yourself.

Let me tell you about a new game. It's a team-based cooperative and competitive first-person shooter – you like those, right? It comes from a developer that has innovated in the genre before, and the game has a ton of playable characters, each with their own unique weapons, abilities, and different play styles. The game features an added layer of A.I.-controlled bots that goes beyond what Titanfall did and affects the overall flow of the game's tug-of-war matches. It's also got a rapid leveling system that resets after each match, so everyone starts on the same playing field and can experiment with different builds instead of being locked into a lengthy progression path. Sounds like a game that's got some interesting ideas, right?

Video Games: The Movie Review

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Video Games: The Movie Review

As the title suggests, Video Games: The Movie aims to tell the entire history of the industry in a little over an hour and a half. Whether it's due to having too wide a focus or just poor craftsmanship, the film is unsatisfying, shallow, and oddly structured.

As a longtime game journalist, I'm glad to see that documentarians are turning their eye toward video games; the industry is full of stories that deserve to be told. Unlike recent films like Indie Game: The Movie or Free To Play, which were structured around a handful of individual people, Video Games: The Movie aims higher. It's intended to be a comprehensive history of video games, from its humble mid-century beginnings to the commercial dominance of today.

It is a noble idea. Director Jeremy Snead reached out to fans on Kickstarter in 2013 and raised $107,235 - well over his goal of $60,000. I assume much more was contributed by executive producers actor Zach Braff (Garden State), game designer Cliff Bleszinski (Gears of War), and Sony executive David Perry (PlayStation Now). The film has top-notch production values, including a plethora of animated infographics and an effective opening-credits sequence that details the evolution of games over time.

[Update] Meet The Cast Of Hyrule Warriors

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Update:  Fi, the spirit of the Skyward Sword's Goddess Sword, twirls onto the battlefield alongside Impa, Agitha, and others this fall.

Ever since traversing Hyrule in 3D for the first time in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, fans have been clamoring for more action-oriented Link. He made an appearance in Soul Calibur II, but now, in Wii U's  Hyrule Warriors, he’s bringing some friends (and enemies) with him onto the battlefield to take down hordes of Moblins, Lizalfos Knights and Dodongos.

We'll continue to update this as more characters are confirmed. For now, check out some of the fighters and their more powerful attacks.

Meet Battleborn's Oscar Mike, Miko, & Phoebe

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Gearbox's newest cooperative and competitive shooter gathers heroes from across the universe in a battle over the final burning star. This epic premise not only allows the developer to present gamers with characters of wildly contrasting themes, but play styles as well. In today's feature, we're looking at three characters who illustrate Battleborn's extreme variety: the prototypical space soldier, Oscar Mike; a mystical fungi warrior named Miko; and a telekinetic rapier-wielding technocrat named Phoebe. Read on to learn about each character's unique weapons and abilities, and for our hands-on impressions of the game.

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Five Video Game Song Re-Imaginings Better Than The Originals

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Five Video Game Song Re-Imaginings Better Than The Originals

Classic video game soundtracks are dangerous to play with. It's easy to change them considering the limited palette of sounds they were originally created with, but change them too much and they lose what made them special. Sometimes though, modernizing a soundtrack works, and hearing a classic video game song cane become an exciting new and somehow still familiar experience all at the same time.

The selection below are a few re-imagined songs that appeared in official entries in the franchises they represent. I think they surpass their inspirations using the modern tools available to the composers, while still doing an exceptional job recalling the original songs.

Donkey Kong Country(Please visit the site to view this media)