Firefall Launch Impressions

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Firefall Launch Impressions

Red 5 Studios and Firefall have been a long time coming since we first got a glimpse many years ago at PAX. The free-to-play game is now live on Steam, drastically changed since the initial concepts, and has undergone significant changes during an extensive beta phase. The game can be enjoyed in first or third person and has a wide variety of different classes (battleframes) that a character can explore on a single character as they journey through Firefall’s vast, ever-changing world.

Firefall takes many of the aspects of the MMORPG like leveling, crafting, persistent resource acquisition, grouping to take on encounters, optional PVP, and archetypal classes, and rolls them into a fast-paced FPS-style sci-fi open-world framework that lets players explore on foot, in the air with their jetpacks, and on gliders and vehicles.

Five Reasons I Want A Zelda: Majora’s Mask 3DS Remake

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Five Reasons I Want A Zelda: Majora’s Mask 3DS Remake

Rumors about a Majora’s Mask remake similar to the Ocarina of Time remake for 3DS have been swirling for years. Some have even gone so far to take matters into their own hands. When it comes down to it, everyone would love to see all of their favorite games remade to modern standards, but there are few reasons I want to see a Majora’s Mask remake in particular, beyond just wanting to see a prettier version.

1. Majora’s Mask is the strangest of the Zelda titles

Majora’s Mask is weird. It retains many of Zelda’s familiar staples (dungeons, items, etc.), but its take on the flow of time and characters is not only unlike any Zelda game, but it’s unlike most games in general. It has a devoted fanbase, but it also has a group of fans who either didn’t get it, or just didn’t like it. A remake would give those Zelda players an opportunity to give the game another shot and hopefully figure out what makes it so special.

Super Replay – Resident Evil Episode 4

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Super Replay – Resident Evil Episode 4

Today marks the 16th anniversary of the infamous Spencer Mansion incident. On July 24, 1998, members of the Raccoon City Police Department's S.T.A.R.S. Alpha Team entered a biohazardous, trap-filled mansion nestled in a dense forest of the Arklay Mountains. Many of the RPD's finest died battling the biological abominations roaming the huge estate's dusty halls. To commemorate this important chapter in the Resident Evil series and the horror genre, we're revisiting both the original 1996 PlayStation version of Resident Evil, as well as the excellent 2002 GameCube remake.

For this Super Replay, we'll be switching off between the two versions of the game beginning with the PlayStation original. Each subsequent episode will switch back and forth between the two versions. If you're new to the series, expect a lot of cautious crawling through the monster-infested mansion, careful conservation of ammo and health, and chunks of backtracking to unlock new areas. And as with every playthrough of a Resident Evil game, there are bound to be surprises and close calls that rattle even experienced zombie hunters like us.

Lego Batman's Troy Baker On More Last Of Us And Dee Bradley Baker On Left 4 Dead

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During Comic Con, we had the opportunity to sit in on round table discussions with some of the voice actors in Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham. After beginning the interview by saying, "I’m Batman. I’m Batman. No, no. I’m Batman," in Batman's gravely voice, Troy Baker (Last of Us, Infamous Second Son, BioShock Infinite, Middle-earth: Shadow Of Mordor) talked about playing both Batman and Joker, how he quickly got over his jealousy of not playing Batman in The Lego Movie, and why he's on board with whatever Naughty Dog wants to do next – including a Last of Us sequel.

Game Informer: Who are you again?

Troy Baker: I’m Batman. B-A-T-M-A-N-D-A-R-K-K-N-I-G-H-T.

End Of An Era: By The Numbers

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After spending the last month publishing our best-of lists of the last generation, we decided to break down the numbers and see which of the past nine years were the best for gamers, which console had the most exclusive titles appear on our lists, and which publishers delivered the largest amount of great games. Here are our findings.

The Rise and Fall

To gather this data, we created a spreadsheet document with all the games, systems, and years for every game that made one of our overall console best-of lists and the various genre best-of lists (like Best Shooters of the Generation, etc.).

Replay – Clock Tower

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The Clock Tower series made its debut in North America back '97 on the PS1, quickly becoming a cult classic. The gameplay focused on running and hiding instead of brawn, and excelled by combining elements of survival horror and adventure games. Clock Tower introduced us to Scissorman and swapped between three different character scenarios. The story kept you wondering who would be attacked next and exactly who was behind the man who took such delight in cutting apart people's insides. 

In this episode of Replay, join Andrew Reiner, Tim Turi, Jeff Marchiafava, and Kim Wallace as they look at how this classic holds up, find out just what it takes to get away from Scissorman, and attempt to predict the culprit. More importantly, will they survive the old-school mechanics?   

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Top 10 Action Games Of The Generation

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The last console generation was packed with some of the greatest action games of all time. The Xbox 360 and PlayStation 4's life cycles were longer than any consoles before them, allowing developers to become more familiar with the powerful tech and deliver better and better games. Imaginative new IPs like Uncharted and Assassin's Creed started as demonstrations of raw potential and matured into blockbuster franchises. Long-running series like Tomb Raider received their best entries in years.

The action genre is, by definition, a fairly broad category. Games that don't obviously fit into more defined genres like shooters, sports, or RPGs tend to fall under the "action" umbrella. For example, Nathan Drake shoots tons of evil mercenaries in Uncharted, but labeling it a shooter does a disservice to the fun environmental exploration and puzzle-solving. With that in mind, by Game Informer's qualification of action games are generally third-person affairs with significantly more to them than a combat hook. As one final note, keep in mind that we limited our list to one entry per series. (Click here to explore the rest of our articles exploring last generation)

Without further ado, these are the 10 best action games of the generation.

Behind The Wizardry: Our Interview With Stern Pinball

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Last week, I posted a story about Stern Pinball and the company’s thoughts on digital pinball. It was pulled from a much larger conversation I had with Stern’s director of marketing, Jody Dankberg. Today I’ve got the rest of that interview, where we take a deeper dive on pinball as a whole. We cover topics including the process of designing and troubleshooting new tables; what makes a great game from a bar-owner's perspective; and why bands are so eager to get involved in pinball.

“I’ve never met anyone who doesn’t like pinball, but I have met lots of people who say, ‘Oh, wow, I didn’t know they still made those,’ or ‘Where do you get one? Where do you play one?’” Dankberg says. “That’s exciting to me because it’s something where people always get a big smile on their face and most people have a fond memory of it, so it’s a really neat opportunity not only to promote something fun, but we get to work with all sorts of cool licensed properties – anywhere from rock bands to big sci-fi movies to big brand names like Ford Mustang, that we’re working on now.”

Band Recognition

Top 5 Remastered Collections We Want To Play

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Top 5 Remastered Collections We Want To Play

Like the HD remakes of the last generation, it’s clear that remastered versions of popular games are going to be a part of this new generation. Gamers are eager to revisit more polished and refined experiences that they already know they love. Single-game releases – like Tomb Raider and The Last of Us – have gotten most of the attention so far. However, publishers also have an opportunity to capitalize on their popular franchises (like Microsoft is doing with the Master Chief Collection) by releasing remastered anthologies for the new consoles.

Of course, on the development side of things, this is easier said than done. Just getting a game to run on a new platform is difficult and time-intensive – and that’s without any new enhancements. Adding in improved visuals, a silky smooth framerate, and other tweaks would be even more work. Those concerns aside, these are the new-gen collections of last-gen games that we would be playing in an ideal world.

5. Batman’s Arkham Adventures