Test Chamber – Duck Dynasty

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Test Chamber – Duck Dynasty

Join myself, Matthew Helgeson, and Wade Wojcik  as we dive into a game based on a show none of us have seen.

None of us know much about the Robertsons (I learned their last name from the game's announcement trailer), but we know that the show Duck Dynasty is popular, and when we posted the game's first trailer as news story, it got a lot of hits and a lot of comments demanding we take a look at the game when it releases. It's not the first reality show to receive a video game adaptation, and it certainly won't be the last, and we're excited to see how it plays.

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Opinion – What It Means Now That Games Have Respect And Legitimacy

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Opinion – What It Means Now That Games Have Respect And Legitimacy

Yesterday, I wrote a story about game resolution that sought to explain why a seemingly insignificant number is so important to so many. In it, I explored the artistic, technical, and business aspects that are woven together to make gaming a viable medium.

In that piece, I made an assumption (dangerous, I know). I suggested that games are an artistic discipline.

This has been a hotly debated topic for over a decade, and the industry has finally earned its legitimacy. The stigma of being a “gamer” has dwindled as devices have ended up in more hands and homes than we ever could have imagined.

Pokémon’s Developers On Virtual Console Absences, Twitch, And Super Smash Bros.

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We had a chance to speak with Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire producer Junichi Masuda and director Shigeru Ohmori recently, and decided to ask them general questions about the Pokémon series.

Masuda has been with the Pokémon series since Blue and Red and served as a director on X and Y. He has subjected himself to our Pokémon questions many times before. You can find our interview with Masuda about the development of X and Y here, as well as our burning questions about the Pokémon series here.

Ohmori has been with Pokémon since the release of the original Ruby and Sapphire where he did game and map design. Now he is in charge of the Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire remakes releasing for 3DS November 21.

Test Chamber – The Evil Within

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The next chapter of survival horror from Shinji Mikami has arrived. You should probably go check out our review here, but you can also watch Daniel Tack, Andrew Reiner, and Wade Wojcik play through a full hour of title in this episode of Test Chamber!

There are plenty of horrible plays and delicious bloopers to enjoy as we move through the first chapter and dig into the second, and as it's only the first few portions of the game things are fairly light when it comes to spoilers. Alternatively, you can wait and tackle the first few portions of the game yourself and then come back to watch me unearth some serious scares and unsettling atmosphere in just one hour of play.

I can also miss zombies at point blank range like a boss, because naturally I've become too reliant on the Destiny shotgun over the past few weeks.

Ten Reality TV Shows That Became Video Games

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Ten Reality TV Shows That Became Video Games

Activision's new game based on the hit television show Duck Dynasty is being released tomorrow, but it's far from the first reality TV franchise to get a video game adaptation. Here are ten of the (relatively) good, bad, and weird reality TV video games.

RollerGames (1990, 1991)Systems: Arcade, NESPublisher: Konami
Developer: Konami

RollerGames was a semi-successful attempt to bring the '70s fad of roller derby into the hairspray-and-spandex late '80s. Basically, it added tighter clothing and some cheesy MTV-era flash to the proceedings. RollerGames did well enough to spawn two video games, an arcade unit (pictured above) that was fairly faithful to the show and an NES game (video below) that was more like Double Dragon on rollerblades.

Annualization, VR, And The Future Of Resident Evil

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Our cover story is on Resident Evil Revelations 2 this month, but we also wanted to focus a bit on the direction of the overall series and what the future holds. When visiting Japan to play Resident Evil Revelations 2, we spoke with its producer, Michiteru Okabe, and also the producer of the Resident Evil HD remake, Yoshiaki Hirabayashi, about the evolving landscape of survival horror games. Game Informer's Tim Turi, also known as our resident Resident Evil expert, asked specifically about competition like Silent Hills and The Evil Within, the pros and cons of annualizing the series, the potential of VR and horror, and what direction the development team is hoping to take on the next numbered entry.

Watch the video interview below to learn all about the future of Resident Evil from producers Okabe and Hirabayashi.

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Analysis – Game Resolution Matters As The Intersection Of Art, Science, And Business

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Analysis – Game Resolution Matters As The Intersection Of Art, Science, And Business

As I typically do at too-regular intervals, I looked back over the stories I’d written in the week prior to see what readers were most interested in. While I wasn’t entirely surprised, two stories caught my eye, both about the same, relatively inconsequential topic.

The issue of resolution and framerate in Xbox One and PlayStation 4 games has been a hot-button topic since the consoles launched 11 months ago. We’ve avoided covering unsubstantiated rumors and reports about variances in this area, but when publishers and developers make official statements, we don’t ignore them.

Last week, Assassin’s Creed Unity senior producer Vincent Pontbriand made news by specifically citing “debates” over framerate as a reason his game was normalized across the two console platforms. Ubisoft rushed to change the narrative, but the damage had been done. We covered this story later than some outlets, prioritizing it lower than items we deemed more pressing. It has since received over 43,000 views.

Five Games Never Released In North America That Would Be Easy To Port

about X hours ago from
Five Games Never Released In North America That Would Be Easy To Port

With the release of Vib-Ribbon recently, it reminded me there are a lot of games that never made their way to North America that could benefit from a digital release today. Vib-Ribbon may never have released in North America, but it did release in Europe, meaning it did go through the rigors of translation. After going through the trouble of releasing an English version of the game, why not release the game digitally for North America players? These are a few more games that should see release in North America with the advent of digital distribution that have already been translated making the process of releasing them that much simpler.

Six Barely Related Minifigs I’d Like To See In Lego Batman 3

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Six Barely Related Minifigs I’d Like To See In Lego Batman 3

The list of included minifgs for Lego Batman 3 is slowly creeping towards the severely out-of-hand side of crazy – not that we're complaining – but it has opened the door to some inclusions that might not be immediately apparent why they belong.

Adam West, talk show hosts, DC executives, and even people who happen to be generally outspoken about their appreciation for The Dark Knight are all being included in the game, so it shouldn't be too much of a stretch to hope these folks make an appearance, as well.

Michael KeatonThere is a scene in the recent Seth Rogan comedy Neighbors where he and co-star Zach Efron discuss who their version of Batman is based on their generation. For Efron's character, it's Christian Bale, but for Rogan's it's Michael Keaton. It is strangely a good way to identify a generational divide, and since the Lego games are all about adults playing games with their children, why not include Michael Keaton? There are plenty of different versions of and outfits for Batman in the game, so I don't want to see Michael Keaton and Tim Burton's Batman. Yet another Batman wouldn't do much to stand out. I want to see Michael Keaton, the actor, hopefully with a Beetlejuice costume.

Replay – Vib-Ribbon

about X hours ago from
Replay – Vib-Ribbon

Released exclusively in Japan and Europe on Dec. 12 1999, Vib-Ribbon for the PS1 is a bizarre entry into the pre-Guitar Hero music-rhythm genre. Tim Turi guides the rabbit heroine Vibri through a myriad of 2D obstacles, proving his sense of rhythm once and for all (after a few tries). Host Andrew Reiner along with Ben Hanson, Jeff Cork, and Kyle Hilliard are on hand for support...and harmonizing! 

You can download Vib-Ribbon on the PlayStation Network (on sale right now for $4.79). You won’t feel like you’re shredding to Free Bird, but the ability to play custom CD tracks adds nicely to the variety of gameplay. Stick around and check out Roulette, it gets weird.

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