Facing My Fears: Lessons From The Evil Within

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As you might recall, I don’t often play survival horror games for reasons I detailed in a recent story. That doesn’t mean I won’t try them, though. And with Andrew Reiner singing the praises of Shinji Mikami’s The Evil Within, I decided to give it a try.

I’ve been streaming the game, and I’ll continue to do so until I’ve finished (you can catch up here). This exercise has proven to be a satisfying way to tackle a genre about which I’m often trepidatious.

I’ve also learned some things about myself in the first few hours of the game that I decided to share as a follow-up to my last horror-themed piece. If appropriate, I’ll be updating this as I continue to play.

Ranking The Entire Resident Evil Series

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Resident Evil is one of the most important and successful series in all of video games. From the first Resident Evil, which effectively launched the horror genre to the upcoming suspense-driven Resident Evil Revelations 2 (check out our cover story reveal here), the series is filled with ups and downs as dramatic as its cheesy, fun story. The horror franchise has transcended different genres, from overhead Game Boy Advance games to a light gun adventure, offering a huge variety to its fans. I became a lifelong fan of the series at age 11 after a nerve-jangling play session with the 1996 original. Since then I've played and beaten practically every game the series has to offer. As part of our month-long celebration of the Resident Evil series, I've ranked all 20 main releases in the zombie-riddled franchise according to my own tastes.

Test Chamber – The First Hour Of Sunset Overdrive

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Test Chamber – The First Hour Of Sunset Overdrive

Insomniac's Sunset Overdrive offers a surprisingly colorful take on the apocolypse, and we took a look at the game's opening hour.

Join Tim Turi, Andrew Reiner, and myself as we cut our way through hordes of mutant enemies while sliding along rails high above the streets of Sunset City. It’s a fast paced, crude idea of the apocalypse, and we had a lot of fun playing the game's opening. Don't forget to check out our review of the game, as well.

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Brian Reynolds And Tim Train Revive Big Huge Games, Announce First Title

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Big Huge Games is a name that anyone familiar with the fall of 38 Studios knows well. But before building Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning, Big Huge Games was known for strategy. Brian Reynolds and Tim Train, founders of both the new and old Big Huge Games developed Rise of Nations.

Reynolds tells us that it was luck and timing that allowed the team to recapture the Big Huge Games name. The trademark was up for auction in Rhode Island, who was selling off 38 Studios assets to recuperate money lost in the economic development deal. The old Big Huge Games was acquired by Epic Games and renamed Impossible Studios before being shuttered in February 2013.

Now, the studio (formerly called SecretNewCo) has a partnership with South Korean publisher Nexon, 26 employees, and is working toward the release of its first game: DomiNations. Reynolds, who also co-founded Firaxis, describes the game in terms that will seem familiar to fans of the Civilization series.

Analysis – Microsoft Is Making The Right Moves For The Holiday

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I’ve previously acknowledged that the resolution of games is an important topic for some people. Until there isn’t a discrepancy between the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 versions on the visual front, that conversation will continue to emerge. But for everyone else, there are other factors to consider.

While resolution is a primary motivator for some consumers, it's equally important to acknowledge that for a portion of the community there are other factors given more weight. Today, Microsoft fired two canon shots intended to make up lost ground in the current generation by capitalizing on the all-important holiday season.

Games Matter, Especially ExclusivesBefore we get into the nitty gritty of the Xbox One and PlayStation 4, we must acknowledge that Nintendo is making big moves. Bayonetta 2, Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, Hyrule Warriors, and the continued strong performance of Mario Kart 8 set Nintendo up well for the holiday season. 

The Five Coolest Looking Weapons In Destiny

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Destiny players love to debate the pluses and minuses of their favorite exotic weapons. Should you level Patience and Time or Ice Breaker first? Which assault rifle rules the roost in Crucible play? Today, we take a step back from the stats, and look at which weapons simply look awesome.

5. Suros Regime

One prevailing opinion is that Surus Regime is the best auto rifle in the game, and a big part of its appeal is its futuristic look. Almost as if it was pulled out of fellow sci-fi hit Mass Effect, Suros Regime has a clean, bright aesthetic that is hard to beat. Not nearly as fancy or overdone as many of the other weapons on our list, Suros Regime wins a spot for being the classic gun we want to hold in our hands in a game set hundreds of years in the future.

Nanoloop, The Amazing Game Boy Music Creation Cartridge

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Nanoloop, The Amazing Game Boy Music Creation Cartridge

Recently, I was cleaning out my basement, and found an interesting bit of of video game history: one of the original Nanoloop Game Boy cartridges.

I remember receiving this in the mail -- or at least grabbing it out of a pile of unopened Game Informer mail when I was an intern. It came as pictured, a plain yellow cartridge taped to a photocopied set of hand-typed instructions. The cartridge was created by German hobbyist Oliver Wittchow, who started working on it back in 1998 and released multiple versions of Nanoloop over the years.

When I discovered what it was, I became pretty obsessed with creating primitive, 8-bit (actually 4-bit in this case) beats. That said, the grid-based sequencer and menu system was pretty obtuse; I never really felt like I totally knew what was going on. You can see a bit of Nanoloop in action below.

Game Informer's Guide To Recovering From A Gaming Marathon

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Sometimes the only way to stay up to date on all the great games coming out around this time of the year is to partake in a long, uninterrupted gaming binge. If you took our advice, you rolled your play time into the Extra Life marathon, and just finished 24 hours of gaming for a good cause. Here's our handy, step-by-step guide to getting your body and mind back in sync with the living.

Step One: Make Fists With Your ToesWhenever we face a dilemma in life, we always ask WWJMD – What Would John McClane Do? – and the answers have never let us down. Our first step for recovering from a gaming marathon comes straight from Die Hard's priceless advice for dealing with jet lag: Take off your shoes and socks, find some carpet, and make fists with your toes. It may sound insane, but it works, and will bring you one step closer to feeling like a human being again.

Replay – Star Wars: Rogue Squadron Spectacular

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We're just an hour away from this year's Extra Life livestream marathon, and we've got 24 hours of gaming shenanigans all lined up. In order to celebrate, we thought we'd kick things off with a special edition of Replay, in which we take a look at all three titles in Factor 5's Rogue Squadron series.

Andrew Reiner, Tim Turi, Ben Reeves, Wade Wojcik, and I start our journey with the first few levels of the original Rogue Squadron on N64, as Tim shoots down probe droids and TIE Bombers on Tatooine, and tries his best not to blow a dreaded escort mission on Barkesh. Things get more interesting (and pretty) in Rogue Leader, which starts(!) with the Death Star trench run and has us questioning the Empire's design decisions. Also during the second segment, Reiner discusses a canceled fourth Rogue Squadron game, with some juicy details from a former developer. Finally, we take a look at the troubled third installment, Rebel Strike. Sure, the flying segments were still great, but the new on-foot levels – including our dubious rescue of Princess Leia – brought the fun to a crashing (if unintentionally hilarious) hault. See it all by clicking the video below.

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A Sneak Peek At Video Game High School Episode 3

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Back in 2012, Rocket Jump studios launched Video Game High School, a web series set in the near future where video gaming players compete in the world's most popular competitive sport. Season three returned earlier this month, and the first episode of the season attained 740k views in only 24 hours. Get a sneak peek at the third episode before it releases next Monday. Video Game High School features production values on par with many cable TV shows, so you know that when the action flies it's going to look crazy. Here's a look at one of the shootouts that takes place during Episode 3.

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And here's a clip showing how the crew creatively deals with set design problems on the cheap.