The Best Alien Games

about X hours ago from
The Best Alien Games

Alien turn 40 today! Ridley Scott’s horrifying sci-fi masterpiece has inspired a number of well-loved video games – everything from Doom to System Shock to the recently released (and fantastic) Observation. However, actual games based on the Alien franchise has been, uh, well a rollercoaster ride in terms of quality. To be frank, reader, most of them are bad. Real bad. However, among that sea of terrible licensed titles are several fantastic games set in the Alien universe.

If you’re looking to celebrate the release by digitally eviscerating (or getting eaten by) xenomorphs, here are the best Alien games to play.

Platforms: Sega Genesis, Super NintendoRelease: 1993

Five Vinyls Every JRPG Fan Should Own

about X hours ago from
Five Vinyls Every JRPG Fan Should Own

Music is such an essential component of the RPG experience. It accentuates the mood of emotional scenes, gives special places in the world like towns personality, and often pumps us up during intense battles. More and more JRPGs have received the vinyl treatment, providing cool designs and serving as a memento from our time with the game.  Whether it's purely for aesthetic or for the fantastic soundtrack, here are five JRPG vinyls you shouldn't miss out on.

Coming up on its 20th anniversary, Skies of Arcadia is a beloved game that first made its way to Dreamcast, then Gamecube, and remains one of the more requested JRPG franchises for revival. Sega still hasn't made those dreams a reality. At the very least, you have this great collector's item that allows you to enjoy Yutaka Minobe and Tatsuyuki Maeda's memorable melodies and be transported right back into the life of a sky pirate. The vinyl edition includes 30 tracks from the game on three LP discs and features brand-new artwork made especially for this edition by Skies of Arcadia's original designer Itsuki Hoshi. You can find more out about it here. 

Five Vinyls Every JRPG Fan Should Own

about X hours ago from
Five Vinyls Every JRPG Fan Should Own

Music is such an essential component of the RPG experience. It accentuates the mood of emotional scenes, gives special places in the world like towns personality, and often pumps us up during intense battles. More and more JRPGs have received the vinyl treatment, providing cool designs and serving as a memento from our time with the game.  Whether it's purely for aesthetic or for the fantastic soundtrack, here are five JRPG vinyls you shouldn't miss out on.

Coming up on its 20th anniversary, Skies of Arcadia is a beloved game that first made its way to Dreamcast, then Gamecube, and remains one of the more requested JRPG franchises for revival. Sega still hasn't made those dreams a reality. At the very least, you have this great collector's item that allows you to enjoy Yutaka Minobe and Tatsuyuki Maeda's memorable melodies and be transported right back into the life of a sky pirate. The vinyl edition includes 30 tracks from the game on three LP discs and features brand-new artwork made especially for this edition by Skies of Arcadia's original designer Itsuki Hoshi. You can find more out about it here. 

Funny To A Point – 11 Wonderfully Goofy Dreams Games

about X hours ago from
Funny To A Point – 11 Wonderfully Goofy Dreams Games

Dreams has been out in early access a little over a month now, and if you haven’t read my review, I’m a big fan. Dreams doesn’t just give players a stunningly robust and flexible toolset for creating games, movies, and art – the tools are also easy and intuitive enough to make the creation process fun. No matter how dumb your ideas are.

I’m no stranger to dabbling in user-created content, from the downright brilliant emblems I made for Battlefield 1, to a regrettable house of horrors in House Flipper. I’ve got plenty of ingenious ideas for video games – but not the technical knowhow to bring them to life.

As I laid out in this handy feature right here (along with a little Cuthbert shaming), Dreams’ incredibly cool tools manage to overcome that hurdle. Seriously, no matter how sucky of an artist you might be, you really can make interesting things in Dreams. I know that kind of sounds like an infomercial, but even infomercial idiots could make cool stuff in Dreams. Well, maybe not that taco lady.

Funny To A Point – 11 Wonderfully Goofy Dreams Games

about X hours ago from
Funny To A Point – 11 Wonderfully Goofy Dreams Games

Dreams has been out in early access a little over a month now, and if you haven’t read my review, I’m a big fan. Dreams doesn’t just give players a stunningly robust and flexible toolset for creating games, movies, and art – the tools are also easy and intuitive enough to make the creation process fun. No matter how dumb your ideas are.

I’m no stranger to dabbling in user-created content, from the downright brilliant emblems I made for Battlefield 1, to a regrettable house of horrors in House Flipper. I’ve got plenty of ingenious ideas for video games – but not the technical knowhow to bring them to life.

As I laid out in this handy feature right here (along with a little Cuthbert shaming), Dreams’ incredibly cool tools manage to overcome that hurdle. Seriously, no matter how sucky of an artist you might be, you really can make interesting things in Dreams. I know that kind of sounds like an infomercial, but even infomercial idiots could make cool stuff in Dreams. Well, maybe not that taco lady.

What Do We Know About Star Trek: Picard?

about X hours ago from
What Do We Know About Star Trek: Picard?

CBS has been actively working to revitalize the Star Trek brand in recent years, especially through the roll-out of a number of new series, including Star Trek: Discovery, which recently completed its second season, and ran on CBS’ All-Access streaming service.

We’ve known for some time that Patrick Stewart is involved in another series, focusing on the character of Jean-Luc Picard, who he played for seven seasons of Star Trek: The Next Generation, not to mention several follow-up feature films. Yesterday brought us the first look at a teaser trailer for the new series, which began to paint a picture of what to expect from the series. Check the trailer out at the bottom of this story if you haven’t had a chance to watch it yet.

While it’s only a little over a minute, there are some potent details to unpack, offering some significant hints about the plot, themes, and setting of the upcoming Star Trek: Picard.

What Do We Know About Star Trek: Picard?

about X hours ago from
What Do We Know About Star Trek: Picard?

CBS has been actively working to revitalize the Star Trek brand in recent years, especially through the roll-out of a number of new series, including Star Trek: Discovery, which recently completed its second season, and ran on CBS’ All-Access streaming service.

We’ve known for some time that Patrick Stewart is involved in another series, focusing on the character of Jean-Luc Picard, who he played for seven seasons of Star Trek: The Next Generation, not to mention several follow-up feature films. Yesterday brought us the first look at a teaser trailer for the new series, which began to paint a picture of what to expect from the series. Check the trailer out at the bottom of this story if you haven’t had a chance to watch it yet.

While it’s only a little over a minute, there are some potent details to unpack, offering some significant hints about the plot, themes, and setting of the upcoming Star Trek: Picard.

Rage 2 Is At Its Best When It Channels Dishonored

about X hours ago from
Rage 2 Is At Its Best When It Channels Dishonored

This past week Rage 2 released to thunderous a mild and polite smattering of applause. In spite of the game's fantastic combat system, its world, story, vehicular gameplay, and pretty much everything else outside of charging into the fray with mutants and bandits leaves much to be desired. However, in spite of those failings, it's worth expanding on just how great Rage 2's combat system is and why I hope this troubled outing isn't the last we've seen of it.

When Gears Of War and Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare changed the industry's approach to shooters, resulting in a years-long bombardment of the genre that was obsessed with gritty realism or embracing bleak edgy material, a lot of the more frantic shooters went away for a bit. However, to say that Rage 2's gunplay is merely an arcadey throwback to the likes of Doom, Quake, Unreal Tournament, and other fantastical retro bloodbaths is a disservice to what this surprise sequel does right. Wolfenstein reinvented itself by bearing down on a tragic, epic story featuring well thought out characters and dollops of wacky, blood-soaked shenanigans. The 2016 Doom reboot didn't really reinvent itself as much as it put its best elements forward and modernized them for a new generation, forcing players to become a constant whirlwind of shotgun-toting death if they have any hope of surviving the horrors of hell.

Rage 2 Is At Its Best When It Channels Dishonored

about X hours ago from
Rage 2 Is At Its Best When It Channels Dishonored

This past week Rage 2 released to thunderous a mild and polite smattering of applause. In spite of the game's fantastic combat system, its world, story, vehicular gameplay, and pretty much everything else outside of charging into the fray with mutants and bandits leaves much to be desired. However, in spite of those failings, it's worth expanding on just how great Rage 2's combat system is and why I hope this troubled outing isn't the last we've seen of it.

When Gears Of War and Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare changed the industry's approach to shooters, resulting in a years-long bombardment of the genre that was obsessed with gritty realism or embracing bleak edgy material, a lot of the more frantic shooters went away for a bit. However, to say that Rage 2's gunplay is merely an arcadey throwback to the likes of Doom, Quake, Unreal Tournament, and other fantastical retro bloodbaths is a disservice to what this surprise sequel does right. Wolfenstein reinvented itself by bearing down on a tragic, epic story featuring well thought out characters and dollops of wacky, blood-soaked shenanigans. The 2016 Doom reboot didn't really reinvent itself as much as it put its best elements forward and modernized them for a new generation, forcing players to become a constant whirlwind of shotgun-toting death if they have any hope of surviving the horrors of hell.

Interview with Blizzard President J. Allen Brack

about X hours ago from
Interview with Blizzard President J. Allen Brack

When Blizzard co-founder Mike Morhaime announced his retirement last year, the mantle passed to new president J. Allen Brack. After years over overseeing World of Warcraft, Brack now brings his years of experience to lead Blizzard into a new era. I sat down with him to hear his thoughts and Blizzard's process and we can expect in the future.

Previously, your main focus was World of Warcraft. Now you have a new focus: watching over all of Blizzard's games. How has the job transition gone?

I mean I’m a fan of all the things that Blizzard’s done. I’ve put thousands and thousands of hours into Diablo. Lots of time into StarCraft, both StarCraft when it first came out and StarCraft II. I’ve been a fan of all the games that Blizzard has made even before I worked at Blizzard. It’s not easy to love all my children equally, I guess as it were. In terms of the job, I think it’s been pretty hard honestly. But one of the things we’ve said is that we have more games we’re working on now than in any other point in the company’s history. And that’s very exciting. Being able to see those products, see those games, see those things that the team’s really excited about – that’s what gets me up in the morning.