The Kickstarter Compendium

about X hours ago from
The Kickstarter Compendium

Our regularly revised feature keeps you up to date on the Kickstarter games worth watching, and helps you track projects both before and after they’re funded.

Welcome to the Kickstarter Compendium, a gathering of games and game-related projects that we’ve come across that deserve your attention. The crowd-funding model for video games has resulted in some fascinating new game ideas, and new projects are going up on a weekly basis that deserve your attention. 

The only problem is keeping track of it all – what’s worth watching, and what are these different projects about? As an ongoing feature, our Kickstarter Compendium is your guide to games seeking funding through Kickstarter. After funding projects are complete, this feature will also track what games (and game-related projects) got funded and which ones didn’t – and, where possible, offer links to the projects as they are developed. 

Twin-Sticking To Your Guns – From Robotron To Lara Croft

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Twin-Sticking To Your Guns – From Robotron To Lara Croft

Twin-stick shooters have been around since Robotron: 2084 made palms sweaty back in 1982. The genre’s popularity has risen and fallen over the years, enjoying an unmistakable resurgence in 2005 with the release of Geometry Wars: Retro Evolved and a wake of imitators. Now, with the recent release of the latest Geometry Wars game, Tomb Raider and the Temple of Osiris, Secret Ponchos, and more, it looks like we’re on the cusp of another swell. We’re taking a look at the genre and why it seems to have such long-lasting appeal.

First, let’s define what we’re talking about. When I say “twin-stick shooter,” I’m talking about a genre that forks a bit. There’s a subtle distinction between the two main variants, but it’s worth noting. In the traditional twin-stick shooter, players interact with the game using two joysticks. One controls a character’s movement on the screen, while the other is used to automatically fire shots in the direction that the stick is aimed – think Robotron or Geometry Wars. In the other version, you still move and aim with two sticks, but you press another button to fire your weapon. Games like Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light fall into this subcategory. 

Opinion – Game Freak Shouldn’t Remake Pokémon Diamond And Pearl

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Opinion – Game Freak Shouldn’t Remake Pokémon Diamond And Pearl

The arrival of Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire (ORAS) marks the fourth consecutive year of releases in everybody’s favorite monster-filled adventure games. Nintendo has quietly annualized the core Pokémon series. If the franchise follows this new established trend then we’re likely to see a third installment in the X and Y generation, a brand new generation of Pokémon, and (surprise!) remasters of Diamond and Pearl all in the next three years.

But Game Freak and Nintendo would be wise to buck their formula and reconsider remakes of Pokémon’s fourth generation. For a series mired with criticism of stagnancy, Diamond and Pearl stand out as the least ambitious, and safest Pokémon titles.  They are at their core dull games that did little to reinvent the series, and it’s unlikely that new bells and whistles can alter that.

Unplanned Obsolescence

Game-By-Frame: The Importance Of Photo Mode In Games

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Game-By-Frame: The Importance Of Photo Mode In Games

If a pixel were worth a thousand words, then you could spend weeks reciting anywhere between 900 million and 2 billion words for every frame of a game on your HDTV. Luckily, you don’t have to: photo mode says it all for you.

For context, photo mode is a function in some video games that allows players to pause the on-screen action and zoom, pan, and tilt the scene before snapping a screenshot. Games have done it with varying degrees of depth – Super Smash Bros. Brawl had a camera mode, Forza 5 features one, and Pokémon Snap is literally one big photo mode – but the feature has come into its own with the turn of this console generation, which allows for a wider set of tools for the budding game photographer. Infamous: Second Son, The Last of Us Remastered, and Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor all boast robust photo modes that include free-flying camera movement, depth-of-field options, social media integration, and more.

10 Exciting Indies To Put On Your Radar

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10 Exciting Indies To Put On Your Radar

We're just coming off The Game Awards and the Playstation Experience expo, where indies with fascinating concepts were out in full swing. Finding it hard to keep track of them? We’ve got you covered. From an MMO embracing exploration over combat to a throwback to RPGs of yesteryear, we highlighted games that stood out.

Tacoma (PC/Mac/Linux)

After turning heads with Gone Home, Fullbright is ready for its next adventure. At The Game Awards, the team announced a new project entitled Tacoma. From the brief trailer, Tacoma won't have you exploring a house, but instead a place called the Tacoma Lunar Transfer Station. Seeing the next game take on a sci-fi backdrop is already exciting, especially as Fullbright already proved it could tell a compelling story with merely objects. We're excited to see what the team can do with a different setting that's 200,000 miles from earth. 

Super Replay – Soul Blazer: All Episodes

about X hours ago from
Super Replay – Soul Blazer: All Episodes

In this Super Replay, we tackle a lesser known SNES classic – Soul Blazer. Developed by Quintet and published by Enix, the action-RPG tasks the player with recovering lost souls after a deal with the evil being Deathtoll goes wrong. Remember Actraiser? There's some inspiration from that title in this first game of a trilogy, with the more recognizable Illusion of Gaia and Terranigma following up Soul Blazer.

With Dan Tack piloting, this Super Replay features Andrew Reiner, Tim Turi, Kimberly Wallace, and Jeff Cork as they move from world to world recovering Souls and discussing Indiana Jones, Netflix, various colors, and lethal squirrels. For this Super Replay, all episodes are available immediately, so there's no waiting if you want to push through the entire epic playthrough in a single go!

For more episodes of Replay, click the banner below. 

Watch Myst Meet Infinity Blade In DrinkBox's Severed

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Watch Myst Meet Infinity Blade In DrinkBox's Severed

With incredibly impressive games under their belt like Tales From Space: About A Blob and Guacamelee, DrinkBox Studios is a name that should grab your attention. At the PlayStation Experience convention this weekend in Las Vegas, the team showed off an extended demo for their new game Severed. Launching on the Vita and possibly making its way to other touchscreen devices down the road, Severed has players exploring a world and slashing at enemies a-la Infinity Blade. We grabbed Chris McQuinn and Graham Smith from DrinkBox and filmed their playthrough of the demo.

Watch the video below to see the developers explore the world, slice up enemies, and hunt for eyeballs.

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