Test Chamber – Screamride Demo

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Screamride Demo

If you've ever played Roller Coaster Tycoon and wished that you had the ability to cause even more mayhem, it looks like Screamride will be right up your alley. The demo released today, and it delivers a mix of Burnout-style crashes and more traditional coaster-building.

Join me, Andrew Reiner, and Wade Wojcik as we torment our riders. Whether they are being launched toward blimps or boarding incomplete coasters, these idiots love every second and wear vacant, drug-induced smiles. Despite some questionable engineering and trajectory estimation on our part, everyone in the game seems to be having a great time. We are too, judging by how much the crashes make us laugh. 

Check it out for yourself below, and keep on Screamride when the full version releases on March 3 for Xbox One and Xbox 360.

Test Chamber – Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate

Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate isn't the first game in the series I've tried to get into, but it's the one that finally stuck. Not only did MH4U suck me into it's world of perpetual gear upgrading and giant monster hunting (read my review here), it hooked GI editor Dan Tack as well. Dan and I join forces in this video preview of MH4U to take on a couple monsters and explain why we're enjoying the game so much.

Dan wields his deft bow and I swing my mighty hammer at a nasty bunny thing and electrifying dragon beast in the video below.

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Test Chamber – Darkness Assault

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Darkness Assault

We sometimes give in to the demands of Game Informer's community. A few members of one of our more active and beloved communities, the I Watched the Entire Overblood Super Replay group on Facebook (check out the harrowing video playthrough here), sent us a few messages demanding that Tim Turi, Game Informer's resident player of bad games, give Darkness Assault a shot.

Tim, knowing full well that he probably won't be playing a great game, was dragged into the studio to put this game through the paces. We ended up playing it longer than we thought we would. We may become hopelessly lost, but something manages to keep us going. Take a gander at the video below and let us know what you think of it in the comments section.

Darkness Assault is developed and published by Black Lime Studio and is currently available on Steam.

Serious Tabletop With The Family – A Few Of Our Favorite Games

about X hours ago from
Serious Tabletop With The Family – A Few Of Our Favorite Games

Like clockwork each winter when the weather turns cold, I get the urge to gather my family around the dining room table (sometimes against their will) for board gaming. Over the years, I’ve learned a few things about our habits and preferences, which have led me to some great options if you’ve got kids and want to share some time away from the television.

Options for young, competitive gamersMy regular board gaming pal is my son, Paul. He’s six, has an active imagination, and adds color to whatever he’s playing to make each move part of an epic tale.

I’ve aggressively cultivated his desire to learn new games and identify those he loves the most. One of the biggest hits in the house right now is King of Tokyo, by Magic: The Gathering creator Richard Garfield.

A Growing Guide Of Easy Achievements For Xbox One

about X hours ago from
A Growing Guide Of Easy Achievements For Xbox One

I thought I was done with Microsoft's achievements. I no longer hunted down games with easily obtainable points. No longer stuck with bad games just to get the big 50- or 10-point achievements upon completing them. No longer felt the desire to stay a good 100,000 points ahead of my friends, who clearly didn't take achievements seriously enough. And then those sneaky bastards at Microsoft decided to implement an achievement leaderboard onto Xbox One's dashboard.

I'm now back into achievements just as much as I was when Gearbox's Randy Pitchford threw down the gamerscore gauntlet in 2008. I haven't quite sunk to the level of playing bad games yet (as I have plenty of good ones to get to first), but I am no longer retiring games as soon as they are completed. I first dive into the achievement list to see if if any points are there for the taking, or what kind of effort is required to land the triple-digit lunkers.

The leaderboard is a stroke of genius on Microsoft's part. A feeling of satisfaction washes over me when I look at the rankings and see my name in the number one slot. Conversely, I start pulling out my hair when I fall out of the top slot, or, as I witnessed two weeks ago, fall to eleventh place. IN NO UNIVERSE SHOULD I EVER BE IN ELEVENTH PLACE FOR ACHIEVEMENTS!

My First Monster: Diving Into Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate

about X hours ago from
My First Monster: Diving Into Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate

As a PC-first enthusiast that finds himself spending a lot of time on my 3DS as of late with titles like Etrian Odyssey 4, Persona Q, and Shin Megami Tensei IV because I love dungeon crawlers, my curiosity was piqued to try out the Monster Hunter series for the first time with Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate. I’m quite glad I did, as I’m incredibly impressed with the game and have barely been able to put it down.

The combat was a little overwhelming at first, with so many different weapons to try out as I attempted to get used to hunting down the Great Jaggi and moving through the single-player story content with my incredibly annoying, ever-mewling Palico. Eventually after trying to learn the ins-and-outs of the new Insect Glaive and some of the heavier melee weapons, I opted to go with the Heavy Longbow, which I’m still using today at Hunter Rank 3. The weapons all have their own nuances and special abilities to learn, along with ways skilled players can take advantage of them, a system further customized by stat allocation in weapons and armor sets.

The Pulse – Game Informer's Weekly Top 10 (Feb 16, 2015)

about X hours ago from
The Pulse – Game Informer's Weekly Top 10 (Feb 16, 2015)

The Pulse is Game Informer's weekly ranking of the hottest games according to our team. Each Monday we tally up the games with the biggest buzz based on number of editors playing and the time they put into them.

As we enter the Pulse's second week, Evolve continues to hold our top spot and attention. While most of our staff is entranced with monster hunting, other trends are starting to emerge in the chart.

Our team tends to gravitate toward new releases, with editors giving the latest games a test drive. In the coming weeks we'll find out which of these are keepers and which drop off The Pulse.

Return Of The Tombs: The Puzzles Of Rise Of The Tomb Raider

about X hours ago from
Return Of The Tombs: The Puzzles Of Rise Of The Tomb Raider

While visiting Crystal Dynamics for our extensive March cover story on Rise of the Tomb Raider, the development team emphasized that they were planning on responding to criticism of the last game by increasing the amount of large tombs for players to explore this time around. We sat down with creative director Noah Hughes to talk about the renewed emphasis on tombs and puzzles and how the design compares to the earlier classic Tomb Raider games.

Watch the interview below to learn more about how Crystal Dynamics is constructing physics-based puzzles that take advantage of the ancient spaces within Rise of the Tomb Raider.

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Sometimes You Need To Press Reset To Make The Most Of A Game

about X hours ago from
Sometimes You Need To Press Reset To Make The Most Of A Game

Ever since I was young, there are some genres that have required a different approach. Action games, whether third- or first-person, run-and-gun or methodical are simple for me. I start, I play, I finish.

My relationship with RPGs and strategy games has always been different, though. Ever since I first played Dragon Warrior and the original Final Fantasy, I’ve been disquieted by my initial play through.

I couldn’t identify it in those early days, and I didn’t always realize it was happening until it was done. I would play, often for a couple of hours, and then start over.

Persona 5 Wishlist

about X hours ago from
Persona 5 Wishlist

The recent Persona 5 trailer offered us the first substantial peek at the next evolution of Persona and it looks incredible. The trailer has tons of little details to glean, and the subsequent interviews have given us even more answers and questions to ponder. With all the new information, I’ve created a wishlist for what I want to see from Persona 5 to make the series even stronger than before.

More Natural Social Links

When done right, the social links provide powerful optional stories to dive into that responsibly tackle serious subject matter. Sometimes, however, it just feels like you are going through the motions and telling people what they want to hear. In Persona 5, there should be more social links that can break down or progress in less obvious directions. Including more choice and divergence in social links is also important. Journeying through each character’s story would be more interesting if you can choose different events and conversation topics with the person you are connecting with. If their final outlooks are different when their story is complete based on how you interacted with them, it would be even better.