Kirby's Extra Epic Yarn's Devilish Mode Makes It Better

about X hours ago from
Kirby's Extra Epic Yarn's Devilish Mode Makes It Better

In 2010, Kirby's Epic Yarn was released on the Wii and I was personally confused by the lavish praise it received. It looked amazing, but the level design was boring to the point where I often felt like I was doing nothing more than moving left to right with no challenge whatsoever. I enjoy easy games and appreciate Kirby's efforts to be a game made with younger players in mind, but Epic Yarn was just bland. Outside of its visuals, it lacked the creativity of past Kirbys, and especially future Kirbys like Triple Deluxe and Planet Robobot, which are among my favorites.

For the 3DS re-release, Extra Epic Yarn, a new hard Devilish Mode has been added, and while it doesn't make the level designs more interesting, it does add some much-needed danger to the experience. You can choose Devilish Mode at the start of each level and it gives Kirby health (which he doesn't have on the standard mode) and makes a demonic little yarn monster follow Kirby around and drop bombs on him, fire arrows at him, or just try to hit him with a quick dash. It reminds me of the Angry Sun from Super Mario Bros. 3 acting like a persistent threat that can kill you any time, forcing you restart the level. Devilish Mode makes boss fights especially difficult by giving the confrontations some urgency, which makes them more engaging.

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Kirby's Extra Epic Yarn's Devilish Mode Makes It Better

about X hours ago from
Kirby's Extra Epic Yarn's Devilish Mode Makes It Better

In 2010, Kirby's Epic Yarn was released on the Wii and I was personally confused by the lavish praise it received. It looked amazing, but the level design was boring to the point where I often felt like I was doing nothing more than moving left to right with no challenge whatsoever. I enjoy easy games and appreciate Kirby's efforts to be a game made with younger players in mind, but Epic Yarn was just bland. Outside of its visuals, it lacked the creativity of past Kirbys, and especially future Kirbys like Triple Deluxe and Planet Robobot, which are among my favorites.

For the 3DS re-release, Extra Epic Yarn, a new hard Devilish Mode has been added, and while it doesn't make the level designs more interesting, it does add some much-needed danger to the experience. You can choose Devilish Mode at the start of each level and it gives Kirby health (which he doesn't have on the standard mode) and makes a demonic little yarn monster follow Kirby around and drop bombs on him, fire arrows at him, or just try to hit him with a quick dash. It reminds me of the Angry Sun from Super Mario Bros. 3 acting like a persistent threat that can kill you any time, forcing you restart the level. Devilish Mode makes boss fights especially difficult by giving the confrontations some urgency, which makes them more engaging.

Click image thumbnails to view larger version

Super Replay – God Hand Episode 9: Asura's Wrath Episode 3

about X hours ago from
Super Replay – God Hand Episode 9: Asura's Wrath Episode 3

After a festive holiday season, Game Informer's annual 12.31 Super Replay usually brings suffering. In years past, this day has kicked off complete playthroughs of stinkers like Overblood, Overblood 2, Blue Stinger, Illbleed, Raw Danger, Martian Gothic: Unification, Sonic the Hedgehog, and Vampire Hunter D.

Figuring out which game will be honored with this spot is a stressful decision that usually takes a full year to figure out. That wasn't the case this year. The community figured it out for us. We had the somewhat official I Watched the Entire Overblood Super Replay group vote for a Super Replay earlier this year. With hundreds of votes cast, the poll ended in a tie between Killer 7 and God Hand. Rather than just flipping a coin to see which one we would do, I decided to record both of them. We knocked out Killer 7 earlier this year, and almost rolled right into God Hand, but couldn't find a window to get it done in a productive way. I shelved the Super Replay until 12.31. It was one of the games I was considering years ago for this spot anyway.

Super Replay – God Hand Episode 9: Asura's Wrath Episode 3

about X hours ago from
Super Replay – God Hand Episode 9: Asura's Wrath Episode 3

After a festive holiday season, Game Informer's annual 12.31 Super Replay usually brings suffering. In years past, this day has kicked off complete playthroughs of stinkers like Overblood, Overblood 2, Blue Stinger, Illbleed, Raw Danger, Martian Gothic: Unification, Sonic the Hedgehog, and Vampire Hunter D.

Figuring out which game will be honored with this spot is a stressful decision that usually takes a full year to figure out. That wasn't the case this year. The community figured it out for us. We had the somewhat official I Watched the Entire Overblood Super Replay group vote for a Super Replay earlier this year. With hundreds of votes cast, the poll ended in a tie between Killer 7 and God Hand. Rather than just flipping a coin to see which one we would do, I decided to record both of them. We knocked out Killer 7 earlier this year, and almost rolled right into God Hand, but couldn't find a window to get it done in a productive way. I shelved the Super Replay until 12.31. It was one of the games I was considering years ago for this spot anyway.

We Discuss Why Some Of Us Are Still Hooked On Crackdown 3

about X hours ago from
We Discuss Why Some Of Us Are Still Hooked On Crackdown 3

Since its release, Crackdown 3 has maybe… failed to set the world on fire. Despite all of its flaws (and the fact that it feels like a game plucked out of 2007) several of us around the office have still been drawn to its chaotic action and its impossibly violent idea of criminal justice. Kyle Hilliard, Leo Vader, and Nathan Anstadt discuss what keeps them coming back for more.

Nathan Anstadt: I’d like to start out by saying that everything Jeff Cork said in his review is completely accurate. The graphics look a bit dated, the action isn’t the most inspired, and the story is slight, but in spite of these gripes, I’ve had an absolute blast with the game so far. It’s as fun as ever to jump twenty feet in the air and hunt down agility orbs. What have your impressions to the game been so far? You’re enjoying it?

Leo Vader: I just beat it this past weekend, I had a really great time with it! I don’t feel like I even have to make excuses for it. The bad parts are bad, but the combat and traversal are both really fun. Locking instant headshots, telekinetically grabbing a car and throwing it at a mech, and then slamming into enemies on the ground all in one jump feels great. The power growth also feels so quick and rewarding in an age where so many titles try to draw out progression as much as possible for maximum hours (or money) put into their game.

We Discuss Why Some Of Us Are Still Hooked On Crackdown 3

about X hours ago from
We Discuss Why Some Of Us Are Still Hooked On Crackdown 3

Since its release, Crackdown 3 has maybe… failed to set the world on fire. Despite all of its flaws (and the fact that it feels like a game plucked out of 2007) several of us around the office have still been drawn to its chaotic action and its impossibly violent idea of criminal justice. Kyle Hilliard, Leo Vader, and Nathan Anstadt discuss what keeps them coming back for more.

Nathan Anstadt: I’d like to start out by saying that everything Jeff Cork said in his review is completely accurate. The graphics look a bit dated, the action isn’t the most inspired, and the story is slight, but in spite of these gripes, I’ve had an absolute blast with the game so far. It’s as fun as ever to jump twenty feet in the air and hunt down agility orbs. What have your impressions to the game been so far? You’re enjoying it?

Leo Vader: I just beat it this past weekend, I had a really great time with it! I don’t feel like I even have to make excuses for it. The bad parts are bad, but the combat and traversal are both really fun. Locking instant headshots, telekinetically grabbing a car and throwing it at a mech, and then slamming into enemies on the ground all in one jump feels great. The power growth also feels so quick and rewarding in an age where so many titles try to draw out progression as much as possible for maximum hours (or money) put into their game.

I’m Enjoying Anthem And I Don’t Know Why

about X hours ago from
I’m Enjoying Anthem And I Don’t Know Why

I’m no stranger to playing weird and confusing games, having reviewed everything from house-flipping sims to erotic milking mini-games, and even a few titles that don’t actually exist. Even so, it’s been a long time since a game has left me as bewildered as Anthem. From its core dissonance between gameplay and storytelling to its dreadfully predictable mission structure to some utterly bizarre design choices and a litany of facepalm-worthy bugs, I am continually scratching my head while playing Anthem. The biggest mystery, however, is why I still feel compelled to play it in the first place. Even Marie Kondo would run screaming from the mess that is Anthem. So why am I having fun?

I should start by admitting that I’m not the hugest BioWare fan in the world – the Dragon Age series has never done much for me, and neither do all the hornball romance options that have players humping their way across whatever galaxy or fantasy realm they find themselves in. Call me old-fashioned, but when you’re fending off an intergalactic calamity threatening all life as we know it, there are better uses of your time than trying to figure out if your sex parts are compatible with some equally freaky alien.

I’m Enjoying Anthem And I Don’t Know Why

about X hours ago from
I’m Enjoying Anthem And I Don’t Know Why

I’m no stranger to playing weird and confusing games, having reviewed everything from house-flipping sims to erotic milking mini-games, and even a few titles that don’t actually exist. Even so, it’s been a long time since a game has left me as bewildered as Anthem. From its core dissonance between gameplay and storytelling to its dreadfully predictable mission structure to some utterly bizarre design choices and a litany of facepalm-worthy bugs, I am continually scratching my head while playing Anthem. The biggest mystery, however, is why I still feel compelled to play it in the first place. Even Marie Kondo would run screaming from the mess that is Anthem. So why am I having fun?

I should start by admitting that I’m not the hugest BioWare fan in the world – the Dragon Age series has never done much for me, and neither do all the hornball romance options that have players humping their way across whatever galaxy or fantasy realm they find themselves in. Call me old-fashioned, but when you’re fending off an intergalactic calamity threatening all life as we know it, there are better uses of your time than trying to figure out if your sex parts are compatible with some equally freaky alien.

The Industry Refuses To Hold Itself Accountable And THQ Nordic Proves It

about X hours ago from
The Industry Refuses To Hold Itself Accountable And THQ Nordic Proves It

Earlier this week, THQ Nordic held an Ask Me Anything on an image board of ill-repute, answering questions from a community that feels rules of any kind are shackles. It was a site that was blacklisted by Google due to reports of child pornography and, within the AMA itself, featured links to drawn underage pornography, homophobic slurs, racial slurs, anti-semitic slurs, and basically any kind of slur you can get your mind around. THQ Nordic’s head of PR, Philipp Brock, happily matched the tone and tenor of the questions being asked with his answers before professing ignorance of what the site was about.

If you take Brock at his word, and there is absolutely no reason to do so, he was the sole arbiter of this AMA and it came from a position of ignorance. Brock apologized for the issue, saying that no one else was involved at THQ Nordic. Despite this, THQ Nordic left the tweets linking directly to a website and specific page with underage depictions of naked minors engaging in sexual activities with adults up for 15 hours. It was not until Microsoft’s general manager of Xbox studios Shannon Loftis called them out over Twitter did they even delete the link.

The Industry Refuses To Hold Itself Accountable And THQ Nordic Proves It

about X hours ago from
The Industry Refuses To Hold Itself Accountable And THQ Nordic Proves It

Earlier this week, THQ Nordic held an Ask Me Anything on an image board of ill-repute, answering questions from a community that feels rules of any kind are shackles. It was a site that was blacklisted by Google due to reports of child pornography and, within the AMA itself, featured links to drawn underage pornography, homophobic slurs, racial slurs, anti-semitic slurs, and basically any kind of slur you can get your mind around. THQ Nordic’s head of PR, Philipp Brock, happily matched the tone and tenor of the questions being asked with his answers before professing ignorance of what the site was about.

If you take Brock at his word, and there is absolutely no reason to do so, he was the sole arbiter of this AMA and it came from a position of ignorance. Brock apologized for the issue, saying that no one else was involved at THQ Nordic. Despite this, THQ Nordic left the tweets linking directly to a website and specific page with underage depictions of naked minors engaging in sexual activities with adults up for 15 hours. It was not until Microsoft’s general manager of Xbox studios Shannon Loftis called them out over Twitter did they even delete the link.