Comprehending A Way Out's Bizarre Minigames

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Comprehending A Way Out's Bizarre Minigames

A Way Out is about two unlikely allies, Leo and Vincent, who must learn to work together to break out of prison and confront a common threat. However, being on the lam doesn’t mean there isn’t time to stop and smell the roses. Along their journey, Leo and Vincent come across a few activities. These can provide more context to the story, change up gameplay, or seemingly have no purpose. Here are some of the minigames that stood out to us, for better or worse.

Disclaimer: For those who like to go into a game with as little information as possible, light spoilers follow.

Lifting WeightsIf you go to jail and don’t come out swole, you’re doing something wrong. The first minigame we discovered is the stereotypical gym equipment in the prison yard. The concept is simple, but the game’s setting would feel incomplete without it. Prove that you’re the big dog of the prison block by pumping out as many reps as you can. The winner gets the loser’s pudding cup (not really, but that would’ve made the stereotype complete).

Top Of The Table – Seven Stellar Games That Actually Teach

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Top Of The Table – Seven Stellar Games That Actually Teach

The educational game scene likely deserves some of the criticism that gets leveled its way. Taking a bunch of facts and jamming them into a tired trivia or card game format isn’t good game design, and whether your potential players are kids or adults, they’re sure to see through the ruse. Fortunately, recent years have seen a surge of excellent releases that treat educational elements like any other potential theme, and build a great design around that concept. 

If you’re a teacher or parent, the games below are ideal for young people who learn best with supplementary game experiences. But in choosing the titles to select for this article, I’ve also tried hard to only include games that I’d happily recommend to any adult gaming group as well – stuff that is fun enough to come out on any game night. 

I’ve also steered away from the wealth of clever releases that teach in an abstract way about strategic thinking, logic, or critical thinking; while those skills are eminently valuable to anyone, the focus here is on games with discrete subject themes like math or history.

PixelJunk Monsters 2 Brings The Series' Tower Defense Antics To 3D

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PixelJunk Monsters 2 Brings The Series' Tower Defense Antics To 3D

The cult hit PixelJunk Monsters from Q-Games has developed a large following for its fun take on the tower defense genre. After over a decade, the studio has finally announced a sequel to the beloved title in PixelJunk Monsters 2.

Rather than delivering an update to the original, PixelJunk Monsters 2 brings the series to 3D for new experiences. You can control Tikiman from an isometric perspective, or drop the camera down to behind him for a more action-oriented view. Unlike most tower defense games, you control your defenses through a character rather than a cursor. Your direct control of Tikiman allows you to assist your towers in defeating the enemies using environmental attacks and head-stomps.

Most stages consist of 10 waves, and the mission is to defend stop the enemies before they devour the chibies at the end of the road. Based on how many chibies you save, you earn points, which can be used for progression. At the end of each mission, a boss character emerges to present an additional challenge. PixelJunk Monsters 2 currently features fifteen stages spread across five worlds, with each one featuring three difficulty settings. In addition, each mission can be tackled solo, with two players on the same system, or with up to four players online.

The Danganronpa Team's Take On The Survival RPG With Zanki Zero Is Zany And Fascinating

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The Danganronpa Team's Take On The Survival RPG With Zanki Zero Is Zany And Fascinating

The team behind Danganronpa is making a new survival RPG called Zanki Zero: Last Beginning. The title was previously only announced for Japan, but Spike Chunsoft has confirmed the game is coming to U.S. and Europe.

An apocalyptic event has wiped out humanity. Only eight clones remain on the abandoned planet, each one representing the seven deadly sins (the remaining clone represents the original sin). The clones have various specialties ranging from editor to doctor to florist. These clones only live for 13 days. During this time, the clones go from a young child to an elderly person at a remarkable rate. When the 13 days are over (or enough damage is done to the clone), they die. However, using the Extend Machine, new versions of that clone can be created, and the new versions retain all the skills and memories of the former version.

Check Out Some Exclusive Preview Cards From The Elder Scrolls Legends: Houses Of Morrowind

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Check Out Some Exclusive Preview Cards From The Elder Scrolls Legends: Houses Of Morrowind

The next story expansion for The Elder Scrolls Legends lands on March 29, and we have two new preview cards to share. The 149 card expansion taps into the Great Houses and other memorable aspects from Morrowind Of particular interest, this expansion brings 3 attribute cards to the game (previously limited to 2). Let's check out the cards!

Ghostgate Defender is a bread-and-butter selection that easily fits into decks looking for versatile options. Sometimes you just need an early game blocker to stave off incoming swarms or aggressive decks.

However, unlike other similar cards that may lose value as the game goes on and the stakes grow larger, Ghostgate Defender can be played with its Exalt mechanic for an additional, possibly significant ability. While it may not create bold new deck archetypes, it's a solid option that can be useful in a variety of situations.

We Debate Which Is Better: PUBG Or Fortnite?

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We Debate Which Is Better: PUBG Or Fortnite?

PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds and Fortnite are not the first battle royale titles, but both have propelled into sky-high popularity within the past year. While each game is acclaimed, Jon Bowman (team Fortnite) and Robbie Key (team PUBG) pull out all stops to convince each other which game is superior. Will one be swayed, or will they stay set in their ways?

Robbie – Before we discuss why PUBG is better than Fortnite, we need to make one thing crystal clear: they are quite similar to one another and are both great.

Jon – Only with the crystal clear disclaimer part. If you've played only one of these two before jumping into the other, you'll pick up the basics with relative ease. You always start by picking a location on the map, jumping out of some airborne vehicle, scrounging for weaponry, then sticking to the circled map areas as you mow down opponents. You can play both of these games solo, but each are at its finest when you're in a group to  call out enemies, coordinate attacks, and share resources.

The Mythology Of Kratos: God Of War's Story Thus Far

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The Mythology Of Kratos: God Of War's Story Thus Far

This April, the God of War series will return after five years of silence. Kratos desolated the Greek pantheon and the world they ruled over, but he's somehow stolen away to the Norse realm to conduct a quiet life of isolation.

How did he wind up there? What trail of bodies did the Ghost of Sparta leave in his unbridled wake toward Mt. Olympus? How did his bloodied descent into revenge go from bad to unthinkable? We've gathered our scrolls and compiled a chronological synopsis of God of War to give you the full tale of Kratos' unbelievable life.

Before God of WarSpartan youth are stripped of their innocence and made into relentless warriors early on, and Kratos' origin is no different. He proves himself beyond his peers, and while his brother, Deimos, might have been his equal, he was taken away by Ares and Athena in his youth as revealed in the PSP title Ghost of Sparta. In memory of him, Kratos branded himself with red tattoos in the vein of his brother's unconventional birthmarks.

The Best Indie Games Of GDC 2018

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The Best Indie Games Of GDC 2018

Game Developers Conference features an annual convergence of some of the best minds in the video game industry, and many of them have games to show. GDC typically features a huge slate of independent games, and this year is no different. From the large GDC Play area and The Mix reception to special curated showcases hosted by Nintendo and Microsoft, there is no shortage of independent developers with exciting titles to show off.

Check out the coolest and most interesting indie games the Game Informer crew in attendance at GDC 2018 played during the conference.

Games are listed alphabetically.

An Overwatch League Player Got His Start Playing At 12 Frames Per Second

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An Overwatch League Player Got His Start Playing At 12 Frames Per Second

Boston Uprising's Mikias Yohannes began gaming competitively when he was in sixth grade. He reached the Master League in Starcraft II, falling in love with most of Blizzard's work, including World of WarCraft. In his sophomore year of high school, his family fell on tough times, and Yohannes eventually became homeless. This forced him to sleep in his father's car, shower at his school's gym, and spend a lot of his time at a church to do his homework and his own hobbies. He repeated that routine for roughly eight months.

"During that time I was really looking for an escape from the struggles I was going through," Yohannes tells me. "Video games were a huge part of that escape. I would go to any place that had internet to watch a bunch of videos of StarCraft II strategies and stuff. It would distract my brain from what was going on around me. I was able to be engaged with how the game was still being played.

RPG Grind Time – The Community Is One Of Monster Hunter World's Biggest Successes

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RPG Grind Time – The Community Is One Of Monster Hunter World's Biggest Successes

Toxicity and online games are almost inseparable these days. Something about working together always seems to bring out the worst in people. From an early age, society tries to prepare us for this challenge by giving us group projects and ways to handle our differing opinions. Still, you can’t deny the tension of a group setting, and the anonymity of the internet tempts people to be more brazen, including slinging insults and griefing. Through the years, we’ve watched this fester in MMORPGs and competitive games such as League of Legends and Overwatch, but something feels very different with the Monster Hunter community: it’s a welcoming atmosphere where players genuinely want to help others. 

Monster Hunter: World was the first game where the “gotta hunt them all” craze totally captivated me. I had tried previous entries but never found comfort with the controls and complicated mechanics. A few nights ago, the credits finally rolled for me on World. I defeated all the high-rank monsters, leaving me with the option to continue to rank up by fighting these baddies for cooler armor and bragging rights. I started as a complete noob, but worked my way to understanding the game, slowly learning new weapon strategies and monster patterns.