A Quick Primer On Joker For Smash Players

about X hours ago from
A Quick Primer On Joker For Smash Players

Nintendo announced Joker from the Persona series as the first fighter included in the Fighters Pass last December, but we didn’t know exactly when he’d join the battle. Well fans of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate were treated to the surprise announcement last night that Joker is making his debut as a playable fighter today. But who the heck is Joker? If you only own a Switch (and thus haven’t been able to experience the joy that is Persona 5) then we’re here to give you a quick rundown on this character and just what the deal with Persona is. The announcement of Joker as a fighter as well as the recent tease of the upcoming Persona 5 S are both strong indicators Switch players may be able to see for themselves before too long. But who has that kind of time? If you have played both, then good job! You did it! For everyone else, here’s everything you need to know.

Xbox One S All-Digital Edition Is A Missed Opportunity

about X hours ago from
Xbox One S All-Digital Edition Is A Missed Opportunity

When it was reported last year, an Xbox One without the disc drive seemed like a potential home run for Microsoft. The Xbox One has lagged behind PlayStation 4 in sales through most of this generation, and a large part of that revolved around a botched launch and a steeper price point than its competitor. Microsoft has since rectified many of those problems, listening to its fans and adjusting its prices to compete with the PS4. The digital-only Xbox One could have landed as the best value console on the market, but not enough differential between it and the standard Xbox One S leads to it being a missed opportunity for Microsoft.

An Xbox One with no disc drive removes key functionality of the system. Not only does it lose the ability to play physical games, but it also loses one edge the Xbox One S has over even the PlayStation 4 Pro: a 4K Blu-ray drive. Losing the ability to play any physical media is a large blow, but with the right incentives, it could have made the case that it’s worth it.

Xbox One S All-Digital Edition Is A Missed Opportunity

about X hours ago from
Xbox One S All-Digital Edition Is A Missed Opportunity

When it was reported last year, an Xbox One without the disc drive seemed like a potential home run for Microsoft. The Xbox One has lagged behind PlayStation 4 in sales through most of this generation, and a large part of that revolved around a botched launch and a steeper price point than its competitor. Microsoft has since rectified many of those problems, listening to its fans and adjusting its prices to compete with the PS4. The digital-only Xbox One could have landed as the best value console on the market, but not enough differential between it and the standard Xbox One S leads to it being a missed opportunity for Microsoft.

An Xbox One with no disc drive removes key functionality of the system. Not only does it lose the ability to play physical games, but it also loses one edge the Xbox One S has over even the PlayStation 4 Pro: a 4K Blu-ray drive. Losing the ability to play any physical media is a large blow, but with the right incentives, it could have made the case that it’s worth it.

How Netherealm Hopes To Get Mortal Kombat 11's Casual Players To Compete

about X hours ago from
How Netherealm Hopes To Get Mortal Kombat 11's Casual Players To Compete

Fighting games can be tough to get into. Most are multiplayer-focused affairs, which can be a deal-breakers for many single-player fans. Even among multiplayer offerings, they require a degree of dedication to memorize combos, time to brush up on things like frame data and mix-ups that can be intimidating at first. Not everyone is interested in diving into training mode for hours just to make a game “fun” outside of casual button mashing, but NetherRealm Studios has long been doing its best to turn those casual players into competitors. 

As the team behind one of the most popular fighting-game series around, NetherRealm is well-aware of the impediments some players have to getting into them. "We know there's a barrier where, anything that's competitive is automatically a barrier for some people,” says lead designer John Edwards. “And fighting games in particular are kind of daunting, because they seem so scary, and mechanically difficult to get into, and there's all these terms that are thrown around. It just seems super-daunting just even thinking approaching trying to learn how to play a fighting game.”

How NetherRealm Hopes To Get Mortal Kombat 11's Casual Players To Compete

about X hours ago from
How NetherRealm Hopes To Get Mortal Kombat 11's Casual Players To Compete

Fighting games can be tough to get into. Most are multiplayer-focused affairs, which can be a deal-breakers for many single-player fans. Even among multiplayer offerings, they require a degree of dedication to memorize combos, time to brush up on things like frame data and mix-ups that can be intimidating at first. Not everyone is interested in diving into training mode for hours just to make a game “fun” outside of casual button mashing, but NetherRealm Studios has long been doing its best to turn those casual players into competitors. 

As the team behind one of the most popular fighting-game series around, NetherRealm is well-aware of the impediments some players have to getting into them. "We know there's a barrier where, anything that's competitive is automatically a barrier for some people,” says lead designer John Edwards. “And fighting games in particular are kind of daunting, because they seem so scary, and mechanically difficult to get into, and there's all these terms that are thrown around. It just seems super-daunting just even thinking approaching trying to learn how to play a fighting game.”

How NetherRealm Hopes To Get Mortal Kombat 11's Casual Players To Compete

about X hours ago from
How NetherRealm Hopes To Get Mortal Kombat 11's Casual Players To Compete

Fighting games can be tough to get into. Most are multiplayer-focused affairs, which can be a deal-breakers for many single-player fans. Even among multiplayer offerings, they require a degree of dedication to memorize combos, time to brush up on things like frame data and mix-ups that can be intimidating at first. Not everyone is interested in diving into training mode for hours just to make a game “fun” outside of casual button mashing, but NetherRealm Studios has long been doing its best to turn those casual players into competitors. 

As the team behind one of the most popular fighting-game series around, NetherRealm is well-aware of the impediments some players have to getting into them. "We know there's a barrier where, anything that's competitive is automatically a barrier for some people,” says lead designer John Edwards. “And fighting games in particular are kind of daunting, because they seem so scary, and mechanically difficult to get into, and there's all these terms that are thrown around. It just seems super-daunting just even thinking approaching trying to learn how to play a fighting game.”

We Assemble The Perfect Avengers Game

about X hours ago from
We Assemble The Perfect Avengers Game

With over 10 years and 21 movies behind it, Avengers: Endgame will finally wrap up an epic, connected film arc for Marvel Studios. Now with Insomniac’s Spider-Man setting up a larger Marvel “gameverse,” questions are bubbling over for what we can expect from Crystal Dynamics’ upcoming Avengers game. Since its announcement in 2017, news has been pretty sparse about the project.

Aside from the bleak teaser, Marvel says, “The Avengers project, featuring a completely new and original story, will introduce a universe gamers can play in for years to come. The project will be jammed pack with characters, environments, and iconic moments that will thrill Marvelites.”

This allows a few different possibilities. Taken at face value, this could mean that the Avengers project is literally a game that can be played for years, implying Crystal Dynamics is making some sort of online, live-service game akin to Destiny or The Division 2. While the popularity of those games is certainly not something to ignore, this could also be Marvel’s way of saying that the world that the game takes place in will be shared between a number of other game worlds. Meaning, hypothetically, Spider-Man’s world, the Avengers, and any upcoming Marvel games could, like the films, be part of a shared universe.

We Assemble The Perfect Avengers Game

about X hours ago from
We Assemble The Perfect Avengers Game

You don’t always need to reinvent the wheel, you just need four really good wheels. How existing mechanics could give form to the Avengers game.

With over 10 years and 21 movies behind it, Avengers: Endgame will finally wrap up an epic, connected film arc for Marvel Studios. Now with Insomniac’s Spider-Man setting up a larger Marvel “gameverse,” questions are bubbling over for what we can expect from Crystal Dynamics’ upcoming Avengers game. Since its announcement in 2017, news has been pretty sparse about the project.

Aside from the bleak teaser, Marvel says, “The Avengers project, featuring a completely new and original story, will introduce a universe gamers can play in for years to come. The project will be jammed pack with characters, environments, and iconic moments that will thrill Marvelites.”

An Interview With The Composers Behind Resident Evil 2 And DMC5

about X hours ago from
An Interview With The Composers Behind Resident Evil 2 And DMC5

Resident Evil 2 and Devil May Cry 5 released earlier this year to high praise. We got a chance to sit down and talk with two prolific composers – Jeff Rona and Cody Matthew Johnson – that contributed to both games’ assorted soundtracks. Their musical work has also been featured in games like God of War III and Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite.

What makes composing video games different from other industries?

Cody Matthew Johnson: Movies and TV are linear; they go in one direction from A to B. But in video games you’re composing not only linearly (because there’s a point at which the game starts and ends) but you’re composing vertically as well. You have to think about the interactivity of the music. I guarantee you that people are much more passionate about video game scores than film scores simply because you can tap your foot to it; you can sing along to a noticeable melody. With video games, you have the opportunity to be a bit more creative and challenge yourself sonically, but, most importantly, get a player completely immersed and stuck in the fantasy.

An Interview With The Composers Behind Resident Evil 2 And DMC5

about X hours ago from
An Interview With The Composers Behind Resident Evil 2 And DMC5

Resident Evil 2 and Devil May Cry 5 released earlier this year to high praise. We got a chance to sit down and talk with two prolific composers – Jeff Rona and Cody Matthew Johnson – that contributed to both games’ assorted soundtracks. Their musical work has also been featured in games like God of War III and Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite.

What makes composing video games different from other industries?

Cody Matthew Johnson: Movies and TV are linear; they go in one direction from A to B. But in video games you’re composing not only linearly (because there’s a point at which the game starts and ends) but you’re composing vertically as well. You have to think about the interactivity of the music. I guarantee you that people are much more passionate about video game scores than film scores simply because you can tap your foot to it; you can sing along to a noticeable melody. With video games, you have the opportunity to be a bit more creative and challenge yourself sonically, but, most importantly, get a player completely immersed and stuck in the fantasy.