Get To Know Your Three (Or Four) New Destiny Maps

about X hours ago from
Get To Know Your Three (Or Four) New Destiny Maps

Some big additions are on the way to Destiny’s PvP experience in the coming days. When House of Wolves releases on May 19, all players will gain access to three new competitive maps, and a fourth map if you’re playing on a Sony console. In addition, the maps previously exclusive to owners of The Dark Below expansion will enter regular circulation for all Destiny players. Finally, the new endgame-targeted Trials of Osiris will open up for the first time that following weekend.

There’s a lot to learn about the Trials of Osiris, so I’ve set that info aside in a separate story. However, I had a chance to play some Control matches on each of the new maps a few weeks prior to the House of Wolves launch, and came away impressed with each of the new locales. 

Widow’s Court

Five Things To Know About Destiny’s Trials of Osiris

about X hours ago from

A recent visit to Bungie provided the opportunity to dig in and explore the House of Wolves expansion, including several hours of devoted time in new Crucible PvP. While I really enjoyed the four new maps that Bungie is adding this time around, I have to say that I was surprised how much I loved the new Trials of Osiris event.

The Trials of Osiris are set up to be an endgame activity for devoted players, akin to raids for PvE enthusiasts. As such, the level of time commitment and competition is expected to be pretty high, but with appropriate rewards that put you on par with the most powerful gear in the game.

Here’s the scoop on the new regularly scheduled event.

Staying Alive In State Of Decay

about X hours ago from
Staying Alive In State Of Decay

One of the most frustrating things about the zombie apocalypse is how dumb everyone becomes. I understand that the characters on The Walking Dead are worn out and desperate after spending such a long time scrounging around, but they’d be in such better shape if they’d stop to think every once in a while. At least, that’s how I see it from my couch. One of the many reasons I love Undead Labs’ survival game State of Decay is how you're in charge of managing a group of survivors, not that hothead Rick Grimes.

You’re making the decisions; one moment you’re fending off waves of zombies on a solo scavenging mission, the next you’re babysitting a bunch of adults who should know better. Meanwhile, supplies are running short. Death is always close in State of Decay, and it’s permanent. I can’t promise following these gameplay tips will lead to a death-free time, but they’ll minimize the number of times you’ll have to watch your favorite characters get pulled apart because you did something stupid. Probably. 

Ranking The Entire Silent Hill Series

about X hours ago from

Fans of Konami's iconic horror series have experienced their share of disappointments, especially recently. P.T., a playable demo for a new installment called Silent Hills, released for free last year to rave reviews. The first-person horror experience oozes with atmosphere, manipulates players' expectations, and packs in some of the biggest scares the genre has ever seen. That sensational teaser, along with the promising collaboration between Hideo Kojima (Metal Gear Solid) and director Guillermo del Toro (Pan's Labyrinth), had fans riding high for the potential of Silent Hills. That high was cut short this week when Konami announced the project's cancellation in the wake of Kojima's disbandment from the company.

This recent whirlwind is only one episode in a long-running series of letdowns that horror fans have endured since the franchise first emerged from the fog in 1999. While those early titles were eye-opening revolutions in the world of horror games, the series gradually degraded over time, making the cancellation of the promising Silent Hills even more devastating. In the interest of putting Silent Hills' recent cancellation in perspective, we're reflecting on the entire series and ranking them from the plentiful worst to irrefutable best.

New Reasons To Play The Golf Club

about X hours ago from

The Golf Club came out last fall as a downloadable title, and its disc-based, retail copy is now available. Apart from the usual plastic box and disc, it's a Collector's Edition featuring an exclusive digital book, all the updates to the game so far, and the new multi-tour Seasons play.

The big new addition – Seasons mode – features five tours of increasing difficulty (beginner, amateur, pro-am, pro, and elite) to give the game more of an overall sense of progression apart from the detailed course creation options and online play. I played through the five-course beginner season and some of the amateur season on the PS4; winning a trophy for my efforts. While it won't sate those looking for a full-on career mode, it offers just enough of a framework to differentiate itself.

How To Unlock Garubani, The Exclusive State Of Decay Xbox One Character

about X hours ago from

State of Decay: Year One Survival Edition is out today on Xbox One and PC. Early adopters on both platforms will get the Preppers Pack with two weapons and an SUV. Xbox One players have a shot at something extra, though.

If you purchased State of Decay on Xbox 360, you can now transfer your save to Xbox One. Load up the last-gen version and, on the main menu, press Y.

The brief process will move your save to the cloud, where it can be retrieved on Xbox One. Load up that version, and the game will detect there is a save available. This will unlock Garubani Kaur, who comes with her own set of unique weapons.

Opinion: Being A Konami Fan Isn't Easy These Days

about X hours ago from
Opinion: Being A Konami Fan Isn't Easy These Days

The video game industry is a difficult place to make a living. Even the most popular and seemingly foolproof series can fall on their faces, all too often resulting in layoffs and studio closures. In this make-or-break climate, mid-tier publishers are especially endangered, requiring exponentially larger budgets than indie teams to fund and promote their games, while rarely landing the indomitable hits that goliath publishers like Activision and EA enjoy. As the fine line between financial success and failure continues to erode, I can't help but think that a company like Konami needs all the help it can get. Unfortunately, today's announcement of the cancelation of Silent Hills reads like a classic page from the Konami playbook, which at this point I can only assume is entitled The Art Of Letting Down Your Biggest Fans.

I'm not one of Konami's accountants, so I can't speak to the financial sense of canceling Silent Hills. After seeing its profits slashed in half last year, Konami has been increasing its focus on its gambling and mobile divisions, and that could very well be the company's most profitable path going forward. I can only speak as a core gamer and consumer, and in that sense Konami offers up a dwindling library of relevant franchises.

Jensen's Quest For Redemption In Deus Ex: Mankind Divided

about X hours ago from

Adam Jensen is a man surrounded by conflict. After he failed to protect the world from chaos in Deus Ex: Human Revolution, governments and freedom fighters collide over the human rights of mechanically augmented citizens.

Executive narrative director Mary DeMarle (Myst III: Exile, Deus Ex: Human Revolution) explains how Jensen has changed since the last time we saw him, embracing what he has become.

Warning: Contains spoilers for Deus Ex: Human Revolution

Test Chamber – State Of Decay: Year-One Survival Edition

about X hours ago from

Undead Labs' State of Decay throws players into an open-world zombie apocalypse where there are no second chances for characters. If a zombie finishes you off, control switches to another character. Survival and resource management are paramount. If you don't take care of the survivors or enhance your base, you'll be in for a world of trouble.

In this Test Chamber episode, we take a look at the Xbox One version of the new State of Decay: Year-One Survival Edition, an enhanced port running in 1080p and outfitted with new weapons, vehicles, and the Lifeline and Breakdown add-ons. It doesn't take long for me to get in way over my head in zombie chaos. I show you just how ridiculous and exciting State of Decay's gameplay can be. Jeff Cork and Ben Hanson provide insight as to how this game should be played.

State of Decay: Year-One Survival Edition launches tomorrow on Xbox One and PC.

Replay – Star Wars: Battlefront

about X hours ago from

After spending a week at Star Wars Celebration, and getting my first look at DICE's upcoming Star Wars: Battlefront revival, I didn't want the Star Wars fun to end. I assembled a new Star Wars Lego set for my work desk, spent the majority of my week working on Star Wars stories for our next magazine, and it didn't take much effort to convince my Replay cohorts that we should go back and play the game that started it all: Pandemic's 2004 hit, Star Wars: Battlefront.

Since no one is likely playing multiplayer online anymore, we take a look at the game's single-player and splitscreen action in the PlayStation 2 version. We discuss all things Battlefront, the anatomy of stormtroopers, our favorite Star Wars costumes, and watch Tim Turi spend a significant amount of time in an AT-ST.

In our second segment, we say goodbye to our dear friend Matt Helgeson as we play a game that he remembers fondly. The third segment in this week's show is the final Super Replay Showdown between Jeff Cork and me. One will fall. One will stand. And both of us end up looking ridiculous, thanks to Ben Hanson's game choice.