Two Heads Are Sometimes Better Than One – Playing Cho’gall In Heroes Of The Storm

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At BlizzCon 2015, I dove in to play three new Heroes of The Storm characters, but crazy two-player controlled Cho’Gall stole the spotlight. Greymane was a neat take on a mixed ranged-to-melee hero that has a lot of cool gunplay and the ability to get in and out of combat, but there’s nothing like suiting up and playing “You drive, I’ll shoot” with Heroes of the Storm’s newest answer to shaking up traditional hero design.

Cho’gall requires two players to control, and hence will take two of your five player slots when you’re putting together a team.  Players can’t purchase or unlock Cho’gall via standard methods, in order to get him you’ll have to play a few games as the two-headed terror with someone who already possesses the hero via BlizzCon. In this sense, he’s also Heroes of the Storm’s first “viral” hero.

Can't Look Away: The Evolution Of Modern First-Person Horror

about X hours ago from
Can't Look Away: The Evolution Of Modern First-Person Horror

A few years ago, fear and uncertainty surrounded the future of horror games. Nonstop action had infiltrated a genre long defined by gradually exploring morbid environments, managing scarce resources, and evading monstrous creatures. Resident Evil jumped into the cooperative-shooter camp with its fifth installment. Dead Space's sequels skewed more toward action than frights. Newer games in the Silent Hill series were released to noticeably mixed opinions. The genre had evolved with the times, and while many appreciated the improved controls and suspenseful combat, hardcore fans of traditional horror saw a pivot toward weaponized thrills and telegraphed scares. Many wondered if survival horror could accommodate both crowds.

Then in 2010, little-known Swedish developer Frictional Games released Amnesia: The Dark Descent. Here was a game that not only drove players to cower in the shadows from deformed monsters, but forced them to confront their fears through the immersive lens of a first-person perspective. Tasked with escaping a living shadow, they traversed Castle Brennenburg alone and unarmed. They collected lantern oil and tinderboxes to light their way, and slinked in the shadows to escape monsters. Lingering in darkness or catching sight of these roaming monstrosities drained an in-game Sanity meter, making visual disorientation a constant threat.

New Details And Screenshots On Quantum Break's Frozen Reality

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In Quantum Break, time is just as much an ally as it is a foe. The player has some special abilities when it comes to time manipulation, but occasionally time stutters will freeze the action and shift time in dangerous, uncontrollable ways. It's up to the player to survive.

During time stutters, aspects of the world will pause, but many others will get caught in these indefinite, indecipherable loops. During one of our demos for the game, we saw debris stuck in a time loop where it continually fell, threatening to crush the player. We spoke with narrative designer Greg Loudon about the process of designing a world that isn't necessarily in motion and what goes into making it a compelling experience.

Test Chamber — Call Of Duty: Black Ops III Campaign

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Test Chamber — Call Of Duty: Black Ops III Campaign

Call of Duty: Black Ops III takes things to exceptionally weird places during its standard campaign, and it's a journey that's best experienced with friends (or random players) with the co-op option.

Join Daniel Tack, Kyle Hilliard, and Wade Wojcik as they take on a brief portion of campaign content from the middle of the "first" campaign (Yes, there's a cool secret campaign to unlock as well). While the segment selected doesn't contain any real spoilers, be aware that you'll be seeing some mid-campaign content, so if that's important to you it might be best to wait until after you've taken it on yourself. Watch us get blown away by crazy robots, grenades, and the terrain itself in this episode of Test Chamber!

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Test Chamber — Call Of Duty: Black Ops III Zombies

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Test Chamber — Call Of Duty: Black Ops III Zombies

Zombies is more than a mode in Call of Duty: Black Ops III - it's pretty much its own game. The game mode tasks players with surviving against tons of undead waves filled with zombies and other creepy crawlies, engaging with the occult mysteries of The Beast, and unlocking new areas of the city in a search for solace from the unending horde.

Join Daniel Tack, Kyle Hilliard, and Wade Wojcik for a quick dip into Zombie mode, and while we don't make it far, the game offers its own experience progression and special gumball unlocks to help players make slow progress against the tides even as you fall. Check out a sample of the action in this episode of Test Chamber!

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How To Survive In Black Ops III's Zombies Mode

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How To Survive In Black Ops III's Zombies Mode

Call of Duty Black Ops III has a range of cool multiplayer modes to dive into, but if you’re into survival against impossible odds, Zombies is the mode for you. The wave-based combat tasks players with handling a delicate balance of progressing through a city full of secrets and holding back, attempting to play it safe against waves that continue to increase in power.

Players get points for every creature kill and can spend these points on new weapons by finding gun outlines on walls throughout the city. This currency can also be used to unlock gates that lock off areas of the city, ride the train to move quickly to far areas of the city (or attempt to escape a failing wave), or purchase special gumballs.

Here to kick ass and chew bubble gum 

Can't Look Away: The Evolution Of First-Person Horror

about X hours ago from
Can't Look Away: The Evolution Of First-Person Horror

A few years ago, fear and uncertainty surrounded the future of horror games. Nonstop action had infiltrated a genre long defined by gradually exploring morbid environments, managing scarce resources, and evading monstrous creatures. Resident Evil jumped into the cooperative-shooter camp with its fifth installment. Dead Space's sequels skewed more toward action than frights. Newer games in the Silent Hill series were released to noticeably mixed opinions. The genre had evolved with the times, and while many appreciated the improved controls and suspenseful combat, hardcore fans of traditional horror saw a pivot toward weaponized thrills and telegraphed scares. Many wondered if survival horror could accommodate both crowds.

Then in 2010, little-known Swedish developer Frictional Games released Amnesia: The Dark Descent. Here was a game that not only drove players to cower in the shadows from deformed monsters, but forced them to confront their fears through the immersive lens of a first-person perspective. Tasked with escaping a living shadow, they traversed Castle Brennenburg alone and unarmed. They collected lantern oil and tinderboxes to light their way, and slinked in the shadows to escape monsters. Lingering in darkness or catching sight of these roaming monstrosities drained an in-game Sanity meter, making visual disorientation a constant threat.

The Video Game Reboot Report Card

about X hours ago from
The Video Game Reboot Report Card

Over the past several years, reboot fever has hit the entertainment industry. Whether you're talking about film reboots like Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight trilogy or J.J. Abrams' Star Trek films, there's no denying that Hollywood has been riding this wave to the fullest. The video game industry has also decided to use the idea of rebooting a franchise to reinvigorate some of its most well-known properties that have run a little dry. Sometimes, it's little more than a marketing term, as we saw with this year's Need for Speed "reboot." Other times, however, it means an exciting new direction for a franchise that has either run out of ideas or has found itself left behind by modern industry trends. Unfortunately, for every Dark Knight trilogy, there's at least one Fantastic Four equivalent in gaming.

Check out how some of the various reboots of the game industry have fared over the years and let us know which ones you loved and hated the most.