Replay – Earthworm Jim 3D

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A critical and commercial success on the Genesis and SNES, the original Earthworm Jim seemed to usher in a series with years of longevity. But with landmark icons like Sonic and Mario shifting from 2D side-scrollers to 3D in the late '90s, the beloved space-faring worm was thrown into the third dimension with Earthworm Jim 3D, which is widely considered a flop.

Fortunately for Jim, the Replay crew is here with open arms. Join Tim Turi, Andrew Reiner, Kimberley Wallace, and Kyle Hilliard on this journey of poor frame rate. And please, if you do nothing else, stick around for the second segment. It's a visual treat.

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Grunge, Gangs, And Cages: Games That Capture The ‘90s

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Grunge and a distinct lack of glamour aside, the ‘90s were a time of rapid advancements in technology and media. Phones, television, films, and plenty more began to make the first steps towards our modern hyper-connectivity, but are still strikingly tied to the decade.

The video game industry, no stranger to capitalizing off of nostalgia, ignores this decade in favor of so many others. Games like Far Cry: Blood Dragon evoke the neon fury of the ‘80s, while the upcoming Mafia III focuses on the 1960s in a not-so-fictional deep south. Though many people might still consider the ‘90s far too recent to wax nostalgia, a number of modern games capture the decade in all its analog glory.

Gone HomeDeveloper: FullbrightRelease: August 2013

Opinion – Why I’m Waiting To Play Fallout 4

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By all reports, Fallout 4 is a great game. This week, it feels like the gaming world has put everything else on hold to explore the wasteland. Everywhere I look, I see various tips and guides aimed at helping me make the most of my post-apocalyptic experience. All of the excitement makes me want to jump right in. However, even though I love Bethesda’s games, I’ve decided to hold off on starting Fallout 4 for a little while.

Yeah, it sounds stupid at first. I’ve been looking forward to this game since it was first unveiled at E3, so why would I force myself to wait? As an RPG fan, I tend to think of it in terms of optimization: I want to get the best experience possible, but I don’t want to wait forever.

Is Knights Of The Fallen Empire The Star Wars RPG You’ve Been Waiting For?

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Is Knights Of The Fallen Empire The Star Wars RPG You’ve Been Waiting For?

Given the years that have passed since Star Wars: the Old Republic launched, the arrival of a solo-focused, mostly standalone campaign expansion for the game seems like an odd choice. But it’s an intriguing approach to keeping the  community engaged. In most of the ways that matter, Knight of the Fallen Empire is structured to be a new Knights of the Old Republic game, albeit couched within a four-year old MMO. 

The only way to play Knights of the Fallen Empire is to subscribe to The Old Republic, which opens up the full scope of previous expansions and additions. That said, this can be played in its entirety without ever interacting with the broader game. 

If you’re new to the game or a relapsed player who never leveled a hero or villain all the way to level 60, this new expansion includes a dedicated character slot that jumps you right to the previous level cap. It even sets up an appropriate skill loadout and hotbar layout, unless you want to customize everything yourself. Each of the eight previous classes slip comfortably into the new storyline. Some story elements change, like which characters recognize you and how they perceive you. However, the new story flexes to accommodate any character, and puts a bigger focus on your personal decisions than your class.

Exclusive Eyes-On Impressions Of Quantum Break's Live-Action TV Show

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Quantum Break is doing something different than any modern narrative-focused game. The idea of segmenting gameplay with cutscenes between chapters is not new, but Quantum Break is opting for a live-action television show broken into a series of full-length episodes. Quantum Break is being built in Finland, but its television show is being created by Lifeboat Productions under the supervision of Remedy in the United States. During our visit to Remedy’s studio, we had a chance to see some extended clips of the show to get a better sense of how it will look and its role in the game.

For exclusive hands-on impressions of Quantum Break's gameplay, head here.

Kyle: We got to see a number of clips from the show in its current state, which is to say somewhat incomplete. The game is still months away, so the studio developing the show, Lifeboat, is still in production working on completing it in tandem with the work being done on the game. We saw an extended version of a scene shown briefly in a few trailers with Shawn Ashmore and Aiden Gillen talking to each other across a table in what appears to be some kind of prison cell, as well as a clip early in the game that overlaps with Ashmore’s character, Jack Joyce, getting a grasp on his powers.

14 Movies/TV Shows To Watch If You Love Fallout

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Bethesda Softwork’s latest open-world offering is overflowing with adventures, characters, and enemies to encounter (read our Fallout 4 review). But what do you do when your fingertips are numb from all the hours and hours spent marathoning through the wasteland of Boston’s Commonwealth? We’ve gathered some of the best films to watch if you find yourself wanting to soak in that Fallout vibe and ‘50s retro vision of the future aesthetic, but want to put down the controller for a while.

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Them! (1954)If a retro sci-fi film about gigantic, radioactive ants sounds familiar, it should. Fallout 3's "Those!" mission is a clear nod to this '50s classic, with fire-breathing ants patrolling the streets of D.C. Nasty, overgrown, mutated insects are a staple of the Fallout series, and this is as good a touchstone to watch as any from the era. As a fun added bonus, try to find similarities between this film and Rockstar's L.A. Noire.

Game Informer Live – Watch Us Play Two Hours Of Star Wars Battlefront

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Game Informer Live – Watch Us Play Two Hours Of Star Wars Battlefront

No stormtrooper will be left standing at the end of our Star Wars Battlefront live stream. We're taking a look at the retail version of the game, and will explore every facet of it in our two hour show, starting at 3 p.m. CT.

Star Wars Battlefront ships on November 17 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Subscribers to EA Access on Xbox One can test the game right now for 10 hours. If you're an EA Access member and you've downloaded the game, join us for some multiplayer fun. Otherwise, request modes and ask us questions about the game in the chat sections on Twitch and YouTube.

Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (November 12, 2015)

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Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (November 12, 2015)

This week was a light one – but I can't blame you, bloggers. Two heavy-hitters in the gaming world came out this week, and you totally should be spending your limited free time digging into the worlds of Tomb Raider and Fallout. Just feel free to blog about them as well.

Community Blogs For November 5 – November 11:

You've Never Played a Real Game Ralphy Ears has a strong opinion on games, or the "fact" that none of the video games out are real games. It's a lengthy read, but my two cents is that stating an opinion as fact on a topic like this seems like folly. Perhaps you'd like to get the discussion going? Maybe this is all a game, man.

The New Xbox One Experience: Rebuilding For A New Reality

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The New Xbox One Experience: Rebuilding For A New Reality

When the Xbox One launched two years ago, it brought with it a set of expectations that didn’t align with a loyal consumer base. Since then, Microsoft has made enormous strides rebuilding customer trust and listening to fans about feature improvements.

The New Xbox One Experience (NXOE) arrives on November 12, bringing with it one of the most anticipated new features: backward compatibility with some Xbox 360 titles. But the new dashboard also includes improvements and refinements that reflect the reality that a significant portion of users don’t have the once-bundled Kinect. 

We spoke with Richard Irving, partner group program manager at Microsoft about the road to the NXOE and what’s still ahead. The new user interface was born from updates that Microsoft simply couldn’t fit into one of its monthly feature releases. These needed more time to get right.