Oculus Quest Review – The Next Step For VR

about X hours ago from
Oculus Quest Review – The Next Step For VR

Oculus Quest is the virtual-reality headset I’ve been waiting for. All of the hardware is built into the headset, meaning you don’t need a computer, phone, or console to run it. You also don’t have to worry about tripping over cables since it isn’t tethered to anything and is entirely wire free. Setup is easy and you can start playing games within just minutes of removing the headset and controllers from the box. It’s basically virtual reality’s equivalent of the console experience, and it comes packing a hefty library of games.

Virtual reality is still in its infancy, and while it’s great that companies like Oculus, Samsung, and Valve continue to make significant breakthroughs in hardware and games, a new headset is almost obsolete by the time it launches. Oculus just released the Go, and now here’s the Quest, which is releasing on the same day as the cable-connected Rift S (an option we have yet to get our hands on). The Rift S and Quest hit on May 21.

Even if you already have a nice VR setup, or want to adopt to the most powerful solution, which the Quest is not, its mobility makes it attractive. You can wear this thing almost anywhere, as long as you have roughly seven feet of clear space around you for the room-scale experience (or four feet if you want to sit).

Oculus Quest Review – The Next Step For VR

about X hours ago from
Oculus Quest Review – The Next Step For VR

Oculus Quest is the virtual-reality headset I’ve been waiting for. All of the hardware is built into the headset, meaning you don’t need a computer, phone, or console to run it. You also don’t have to worry about tripping over cables since it isn’t tethered to anything and is entirely wire free. Setup is easy and you can start playing games within just minutes of removing the headset and controllers from the box. It’s basically virtual reality’s equivalent of the console experience, and it comes packing a hefty library of games.

Virtual reality is still in its infancy, and while it’s great that companies like Oculus, Samsung, and Valve continue to make significant breakthroughs in hardware and games, a new headset is almost obsolete by the time it launches. Oculus just released the Go, and now here’s the Quest, which is releasing on the same day as the cable-connected Rift S (an option we have yet to get our hands on). The Rift S and Quest hit on May 21.

Even if you already have a nice VR setup, or want to adopt to the most powerful solution, which the Quest is not, its mobility makes it attractive. You can wear this thing almost anywhere, as long as you have roughly seven feet of clear space around you for the room-scale experience (or four feet if you want to sit).

Oculus' Jason Rubin On Rift's Future And Sunsetting External Sensors

about X hours ago from
Oculus' Jason Rubin On Rift's Future And Sunsetting External Sensors

Oculus upgraded its release window for Oculus Quest and Rift S from a vague 'spring' window to May 21 this morning, which gave us the opportunity to chat with Oculus VP of content (and former Naughty Dog co-founder/co-president) Jason Rubin. We spoke about how Quest and Rift S could affect VR adoption, whether or not we're moving into the next generation of Oculus, and why external sensors are taking a long walk into the sunset (for the foreseeable future). You can find an abridged version of our chat below.

The big upgrades for Oculus Quest and Rift S are how they affect cable management, one of the biggest gripes levied against playing games in VR. Neither upcoming headset requires external sensors thanks to inside-out tracking that places all the sensors in the actual headset, and Quest has no cables at all. It is completely standalone. Rift S has one cable that forks into a USB and DVI cable and plugs into a compatible PC.

Why focus on these specific upgrades for the new headsets?

Oculus' Jason Rubin On Rift's Future And Sunsetting External Sensors

about X hours ago from
Oculus' Jason Rubin On Rift's Future And Sunsetting External Sensors

Oculus upgraded its release window for Oculus Quest and Rift S from a vague 'spring' window to May 21 this morning, which gave us the opportunity to chat with Oculus VP of content (and former Naughty Dog co-founder/co-president) Jason Rubin. We spoke about how Quest and Rift S could affect VR adoption, whether or not we're moving into the next generation of Oculus, and why external sensors are taking a long walk into the sunset (for the foreseeable future). You can find an abridged version of our chat below.

The big upgrades for Oculus Quest and Rift S are how they affect cable management, one of the biggest gripes levied against playing games in VR. Neither upcoming headset requires external sensors thanks to inside-out tracking that places all the sensors in the actual headset, and Quest has no cables at all. It is completely standalone. Rift S has one cable that forks into a USB and DVI cable and plugs into a compatible PC.

Why focus on these specific upgrades for the new headsets?

Zelda And Mario’s VR Experiments Are Underwhelming

about X hours ago from
Zelda And Mario’s VR Experiments Are Underwhelming

I like Labo VR. I think it’s one of the weirdest things from a company that is renowned for doing weird, creative, innovative things. I also love The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild and Super Mario Odyssey. The pair elevate the Switch to be one of my favorite consoles, which is an especially impressive feat considering it’s only about two years old. I also love free updates that add new content to good games. Now, with all of that table setting done, I can’t in good conscience recommend you play Zelda or Mario with the aid of Labo VR.

In both instances, you play by placing the Switch, with its controllers attached, in the Labo headset and hold it up to your face, like you’re playing a game through a periscope. It’s not particularly comfortable and my arms got tired as I played, but that’s not a problem exclusive to Zelda and Mario. That’s just Labo VR.

Zelda And Mario’s VR Experiments Are Underwhelming

about X hours ago from
Zelda And Mario’s VR Experiments Are Underwhelming

I like Labo VR. I think it’s one of the weirdest things from a company that is renowned for doing weird, creative, innovative things. I also love The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild and Super Mario Odyssey. The pair elevate the Switch to be one of my favorite consoles, which is an especially impressive feat considering it’s only about two years old. I also love free updates that add new content to good games. Now, with all of that table setting done, I can’t in good conscience recommend you play Zelda or Mario with the aid of Labo VR.

In both instances, you play by placing the Switch, with its controllers attached, in the Labo headset and hold it up to your face, like you’re playing a game through a periscope. It’s not particularly comfortable and my arms got tired as I played, but that’s not a problem exclusive to Zelda and Mario. That’s just Labo VR.

Madden 20 Is In A Pivotal Place

about X hours ago from
Madden 20 Is In A Pivotal Place

Madden usually shows up for the NFL draft festivities, but it's customarily restricted to a batch of screenshots of the first-round rookies in their new unis and a draft-themed program. This year was different, with EA Sports and developer EA Tiburon rolling out a bevy of details about this year's additions.

I'm excited for the possibilities within the Scenario Engine and Superstar/X-Factor abilities in particular, but I also have conflicted feelings about them at this time. They have lots of potential now and in the future, but given how difficult it is to implement them successfully – as well as the fact that the series has gameplay issues it needs to address – it feels like Madden 20 is at an important juncture for the franchise as a whole.

I love the idea of the Scenario Engine, how it could be used to supply both career modes and franchise modes drama points, from locker-room schisms to draft day dealings. The question is: Will it? Because in my opinion, to make these scenarios impactful you have to create an underlying structure to bolster them, otherwise they're paper-thin.

Madden 20 Is In A Pivotal Place

about X hours ago from
Madden 20 Is In A Pivotal Place

Madden usually shows up for the NFL draft festivities, but it's customarily restricted to a batch of screenshots of the first-round rookies in their new unis and a draft-themed program. This year was different, with EA Sports and developer EA Tiburon rolling out a bevy of details about this year's additions.

I'm excited for the possibilities within the Scenario Engine and Superstar/X-Factor abilities in particular, but I also have conflicted feelings about them at this time. They have lots of potential now and in the future, but given how difficult it is to implement them successfully – as well as the fact that the series has gameplay issues it needs to address – it feels like Madden 20 is at an important juncture for the franchise as a whole.

I love the idea of the Scenario Engine, how it could be used to supply both career modes and franchise modes drama points, from locker-room schisms to draft day dealings. The question is: Will it? Because in my opinion, to make these scenarios impactful you have to create an underlying structure to bolster them, otherwise they're paper-thin.

11 Improvements We Want In A Nintendo Switch Console Revision

about X hours ago from
11 Improvements We Want In A Nintendo Switch Console Revision

Rumors of a revision to Nintendo’s popular Switch hardware have swirled for months now. While some report and speculate a new model could lower the price by cutting nonessential features, others are convinced Nintendo will release an improved version that may be more expensive with new bells and whistles not found on the launch model.

While we could definitely envision a smaller, portable-only Switch model that costs less, it’s much more fun to talk about the improvements we’d like to see in a potential “Pro” or “New” model from Nintendo. Here are 11 things we’d love to see on a new and improved Switch.

One of the biggest problems with the Switch hardware is the built-in storage. At a meager 32GB, the Switch’s internal hard drive isn’t even big enough to store certain games on the platform (NBA 2K19 takes more than 30 GB to install, for example). You can expand the system’s capacity thanks to a Micro SDXC port, but that isn’t the point. Out of the box, it would be nice to have a bigger hard drive to house a decent collection before you’re forced to pick up a third-party storage card.

11 Improvements We Want In A Nintendo Switch Console Revision

about X hours ago from
11 Improvements We Want In A Nintendo Switch Console Revision

Rumors of a revision to Nintendo’s popular Switch hardware have swirled for months now. While some report and speculate a new model could lower the price by cutting nonessential features, others are convinced Nintendo will release an improved version that may be more expensive with new bells and whistles not found on the launch model.

While we could definitely envision a smaller, portable-only Switch model that costs less, it’s much more fun to talk about the improvements we’d like to see in a potential “Pro” or “New” model from Nintendo. Here are 11 things we’d love to see on a new and improved Switch.

One of the biggest problems with the Switch hardware is the built-in storage. At a meager 32GB, the Switch’s internal hard drive isn’t even big enough to store certain games on the platform (NBA 2K19 takes more than 30 GB to install, for example). You can expand the system’s capacity thanks to a Micro SDXC port, but that isn’t the point. Out of the box, it would be nice to have a bigger hard drive to house a decent collection before you’re forced to pick up a third-party storage card.