Sitting In On A Design Meeting For Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

about X hours ago from
Sitting In On A Design Meeting For Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

While visiting Respawn to learn more about Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order for this month’s cover story, we had a unique opportunity to do something I personally had never done despite having visited various game studios for assorted features and cover stories during my seven or so years with Game Informer.

Alongside our filming, interview, and hands-on opportunities, Respawn also invited us to sit in on a design meeting for one area in Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order. We can’t describe in detail what the level looked like, its enemies, or what the planet was called (they wouldn’t tell us anyway, despite us lobbing guesses at them), but we can say that it was a much darker, potentially creepier location than what we have seen from the game so far.

Andrew Reiner, Leo Vader, and I sat in the meeting interjecting as little as possible while the team discussed what was working with the level, what they wanted to change, and how they predicted players would react to the level’s layout and enemy encounters. It offered interesting insight into Respawn’s game design process, so Leo Vader and I decided to talk about the meeting and what we took away from it.

Sitting In On A Design Meeting For Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

about X hours ago from
Sitting In On A Design Meeting For Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

While visiting Respawn to learn more about Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order for this month’s cover story, we had a unique opportunity to do something I personally had never done despite having visited various game studios for assorted features and cover stories during my seven or so years with Game Informer.

Alongside our filming, interview, and hands-on opportunities, Respawn also invited us to sit in on a design meeting for one area in Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order. We can’t describe in detail what the level looked like, its enemies, or what the planet was called (they wouldn’t tell us anyway, despite us lobbing guesses at them), but we can say that it was a much darker, potentially creepier location than what we have seen from the game so far.

Andrew Reiner, Leo Vader, and I sat in the meeting interjecting as little as possible while the team discussed what was working with the level, what they wanted to change, and how they predicted players would react to the level’s layout and enemy encounters. It offered interesting insight into Respawn’s game design process, so Leo Vader and I decided to talk about the meeting and what we took away from it.

Control Lets You Bend Reality In The Weirdest Ways

about X hours ago from
Control Lets You Bend Reality In The Weirdest Ways

Thanks to our cover story on Control from earlier this year, we've already learned a lot (and shared it all with you) about Remedy's upcoming supernatural action adventure game. At E3, we had the chance to step into the bizarre world once again and play Control for nearly an hour.

Control's premise is enticingly weird. You play as Jesse Faden, a young woman who hopes to find answers about her mysterious supernatural powers by visiting the Oldest House, the home of a paranormal investigative branch called the Federal Bureau of Control. The demo sees Jesse investigating the maintenance sector of the Bureau, fighting off new types of the Hiss (the dangerous and ghostly entity that has possessed much of the staff), meeting new personalities, and binding to abilities such as Evade and Shield.

Control Lets You Bend Reality In The Weirdest Ways

about X hours ago from
Control Lets You Bend Reality In The Weirdest Ways

Thanks to our cover story on Control from earlier this year, we've already learned a lot (and shared it all with you) about Remedy's upcoming supernatural action adventure game. At E3, we had the chance to step into the bizarre world once again and play Control for nearly an hour.

Control's premise is enticingly weird. You play as Jesse Faden, a young woman who hopes to find answers about her mysterious supernatural powers by visiting the Oldest House, the home of a paranormal investigative branch called the Federal Bureau of Control. The demo sees Jesse investigating the maintenance sector of the Bureau, fighting off new types of the Hiss (the dangerous and ghostly entity that has possessed much of the staff), meeting new personalities, and binding to abilities such as Evade and Shield.

2019 Video Game Release Schedule

about X hours ago from
2019 Video Game Release Schedule

If you're wondering what games are coming up in 2019, we've put them all in one convenient location. This list will be continually updated to act as a living, breathing schedule as new dates are announced, titles are delayed, and big reveals happen. This should help you plan out your next several months in gaming and beyond.

New additions or changes to the list will be in bold.

As the gaming calendar is constantly changing, we highly recommend you bookmark this page. You'll likely find yourself coming back to this to find out the most recent release schedule for the most anticipated games across PC, consoles, handhelds, and mobile devices. If you notice that we've missed something, feel free to let us know! Please note that games will not get assigned to a month until they have confirmed release dates.

Square Enix Wants To Make Its Entire Library Accessible Digitally – Here's What's Missing

about X hours ago from
Square Enix Wants To Make Its Entire Library Accessible Digitally – Here's What's Missing

During E3 2019, we had a chance to chat with Square Enix president and CEO Yosuke Matsuda about the publisher's efforts to make its back catalogue available digitally on modern platforms. Square Enix has been doing an excellent job making its older titles accessible on modern platforms with announcements this week alone for the Mana series, Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, and The Last Remnant to name a few, but there are still some sizable gaps in its extensive catalog. From only releasing on outdated hardware to being entirely unlocalized, here are some games Square Enix should update next.

King's Knight is bad. But it's also an important part of Square's history. It was the first game Square published independently, and featured some of Nobuo Uematsu's first work as a video game composer. The game released in North America on the NES in 1989, and later saw a re-release on the Wii Virtual Console in 2008, but since the Virtual Console's closed this year, American audiences aren't able to experience this part of Square's history without dusting off their NES.

Square Enix Wants To Make Its Entire Library Accessible Digitally – Here's What's Missing

about X hours ago from
Square Enix Wants To Make Its Entire Library Accessible Digitally – Here's What's Missing

During E3 2019, we had a chance to chat with Square Enix president and CEO Yosuke Matsuda about the publisher's efforts to make its back catalogue available digitally on modern platforms. Square Enix has been doing an excellent job making its older titles accessible on modern platforms with announcements this week alone for the Mana series, Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, and The Last Remnant to name a few, but there are still some sizable gaps in its extensive catalog. From only releasing on outdated hardware to being entirely unlocalized, here are some games Square Enix should update next.

King's Knight is bad. But it's also an important part of Square's history. It was the first game Square published independently, and featured some of Nobuo Uematsu's first work as a video game composer. The game released in North America on the NES in 1989, and later saw a re-release on the Wii Virtual Console in 2008, but since the Virtual Console's closed this year, American audiences aren't able to experience this part of Square's history without dusting off their NES.

Hands-on Impressions And Photo Comparison Of The Sega Genesis Mini Console

about X hours ago from
Hands-on Impressions And Photo Comparison Of The Sega Genesis Mini Console

While Nintendo has released two well-made miniature consoles to celebrate its NES and SNES libraries, its former rival Sega has faltered. Opting for a hands-off approach, Sega-licensed third-party Genesis mini consoles have consisted of mediocre-to-bad quality. However, with the new Genesis Mini console, Sega is working closer on the development, and based on what I played at E3, the quality jump is noticeable.

In addition to being a faithful replica of the original Genesis, the Genesis Mini is able to precisely emulate its entire library of 40 games. This is thanks to the project being created by M2, a developer with its history in emulation, including bringing many classic Genesis titles to Switch in the form of the excellent Sega Ages line.

The difference in quality is immediately evident, as I fire up titles like Sonic the Hedgehog 2, Ecco the Dolphin, and Vectorman. The colors look fantastic in every game I tried. While pixel perfection is certainly the mission here, you can experiment a little with how the games look through adding a CRT filter, or stretching to fit a modern widescreen TV. 

Hands-on Impressions And Photo Comparison Of The Sega Genesis Mini Console

about X hours ago from
Hands-on Impressions And Photo Comparison Of The Sega Genesis Mini Console

While Nintendo has released two well-made miniature consoles to celebrate its NES and SNES libraries, its former rival Sega has faltered. Opting for a hands-off approach, Sega-licensed third-party Genesis mini consoles have consisted of mediocre-to-bad quality. However, with the new Genesis Mini console, Sega is working closer on the development, and based on what I played at E3, the quality jump is noticeable.

In addition to being a faithful replica of the original Genesis, the Genesis Mini is able to precisely emulate its entire library of 40 games. This is thanks to the project being created by M2, a developer with its history in emulation, including bringing many classic Genesis titles to Switch in the form of the excellent Sega Ages line.

The difference in quality is immediately evident, as I fire up titles like Sonic the Hedgehog 2, Ecco the Dolphin, and Vectorman. The colors look fantastic in every game I tried. While pixel perfection is certainly the mission here, you can experiment a little with how the games look through adding a CRT filter, or stretching to fit a modern widescreen TV. 

Exclusive In-Depth Profile On Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order’s New Droid, BD-1

about X hours ago from
Exclusive In-Depth Profile On Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order’s New Droid, BD-1

One of Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order’s early standout characters is one that never says a single line of dialogue throughout the course of Cal Kestis’ adventure. BD-1 is a small bipedal droid that assists Cal in his journey in a number of ways. He can hack into electronics and control them, scan elements of the environment and defeated enemies to build out an encyclopedia of knowledge, display holographic maps, and dispense health canisters when Cal needs them. We spoke with the art and sound team at Respawn about what it takes to add a new, unique droid to Star Wars’ canon and find out what it’s like to work with legendary sound designer, Ben Burtt.