The Gigantic List Of All Rock Band 4's Available DLC Tracks

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The Gigantic List Of All Rock Band 4's Available DLC Tracks

Rock Band 4 makes the leap from last generation to the modern consoles with a massive catalog of existing Rock Band DLC, most of which is compatible with the latest game. That amounts to over 1,700 tracks, which can make finding your favorite song a pain when sifting through digital storefronts.

To ease the search for good music, we’ve compiled every DLC track currently available in a more organized format. As new songs are added, we’ll update the article. 

For those curious if Rock Band 4 is worth the price of admission, check out our review. Speaking of price, each DLC track costs $1.99. This week's download, which is being called the Off The Charts 02 pack, can also be purchased as a bundle for $8.49.

Opinion – Nintendo’s Scattershot Approach To Amiibo Functionality Breeds Discontent

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Opinion – Nintendo’s Scattershot Approach To Amiibo Functionality Breeds Discontent

Nintendo’s announcement of Amiibos promised that these recognizable figures would perform special and meaningful functions within its array of first-party titles. While Amiibos have sold well – much better than Nintendo seems to have anticipated – the passionate fans buying these figures are split on how much functionality they want, and that’s a problem only Nintendo can address.

The implementation of Amiibos has been inconsistent, which has likely helped lead to this point. Since the figures’ initial launch in late 2014, Nintendo has used them in numerous ways ranging from meaningful content in games like Animal Crossing: Amiibo Festival and Splatoon to cosmetic additions in titles like Mario Kart 8 and Captain Toad’s Treasure Tracker. While some factions of the fan base are clamoring for more Amiibo integration, others greet new implementation with disdain. 

Today’s rumor that The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD will use the Wolf Link Amiibo to provide power-ups to Link and unlock a bonus dungeon sparked varying degrees of excitement and disappointment from fans. Those who were expecting little more than an HD re-release with a few tweaks à la Wind Waker HD view the rumor that new content will be available from the original game – even if locked behind an Amiibo – as a plus.

A Growing Guide Of Easy Achievements For Xbox One

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I thought I was done with Microsoft's achievements. I no longer hunted down games with easily obtainable points. No longer stuck with bad games just to get the big 50- or 10-point achievements upon completing them. No longer felt the desire to stay a good 100,000 points ahead of my friends, who clearly didn't take achievements seriously enough. And then those sneaky bastards at Microsoft decided to implement an achievement leaderboard onto Xbox One's dashboard.

I'm now back into achievements just as much as I was when Gearbox's Randy Pitchford threw down the gamerscore gauntlet in 2008. I haven't quite sunk to the level of playing bad games yet (as I have plenty of good ones to get to first), but I am no longer retiring games as soon as they are completed. I first dive into the achievement list to see if if any points are there for the taking, or what kind of effort is required to land the triple-digit lunkers.

The leaderboard is a stroke of genius on Microsoft's part. A feeling of satisfaction washes over me when I look at the rankings and see my name in the number one slot. Conversely, I start pulling out my hair when I fall out of the top slot, or, as I witnessed two weeks ago, fall to eleventh place. IN NO UNIVERSE SHOULD I EVER BE IN ELEVENTH PLACE FOR ACHIEVEMENTS!

We Play John Romero's Surprising New Doom Level

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After a 21-year hiatus, John Romero has crafted a new level for the original Doom. Join us at we try it out.

Andrew Reiner and I play through the first few sections of Romero's new map, Tech Gone Bad, which serves as a replacement for the finale of episode one. Despite still being limited by the technological restraints of the original Doom, Romero manages to make the new level feel fresh: Red cracks sprawl through the hallways of the overrun installation and deal damage if you stand still on them, paths of stepping stones have you hopping over poisonous pools (despite the lack of a jump button!), and myriad buttons shift the environments in surprising ways. Whereas the original E1M8 level was rather short and straightforward, Romero's new level feels like a worthy finale, requiring players to thoroughly explore a large and winding installation that's packed with detail while also traversing its outskirts in a massive outdoor environment. The level still ends with the iconic battle against the two barons of hell, but ratchets up the intensity even further. The level is a remarkable technical feat, and a reminder of Romero's design expertise. 

While we sprint our way through the first few minutes of the level, Reiner shares some more of his thoughts on the upcoming Doom reboot. View the video below to learn more and see Romero's level in action.

The Big 2015 Parents' Guide To Skylanders: SuperChargers, Disney Infinity, And Lego Dimensions

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The Big 2015 Parents' Guide To Skylanders: SuperChargers, Disney Infinity, And Lego Dimensions

Over the past five years, the unlikely success of Activision’s Skylanders franchise has blossomed into a full-blow genre. This year, there are three major entrants in toys-to-life space (not counting Nintendo’s own spin on things with Amiibo).

As a service to parents, we’re breaking down everything that’s coming for the three different games. Below, you’ll find complete checklists for the toys and accessories we know are coming to Skylanders: SuperChargers, Disney Infinity 3.0, and Lego Dimensions

We’ve also detailed some things to know about each of the games as you're considering what you might already own (and what your kids say they need). 

Things I Wish I Had Known Before Panicking Through My First PC Build

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There’s always that one guy. You know the one. You’re reading through the comment section and someone inevitably says “PC Master Race! It’s not as hard as you think to just build your own computer.” I’m here to tell you that that guy is a lying jerk and it’s okay to be intimidated by the process.

Once we found out the release window for the Oculus Rift, my itch to get a new PC built became unbearable. Over the past year, my thinking about getting back into PC gaming transitioned from “if” to “when,” and over the past week, to “now.” Here are some lessons I learned (some the hard way) from the experience.

Do Your Research

See How Id's New Doom Breaks The Modern Shooter Mold

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Over the last decade we've seen a wealth of new mechanics filter into the shooter genre. Many triple-A titles have implemented cover-based combat, aiming down sights, automatic health recovery, and much more.

With Id Software's Doom making a highly anticipated comeback this year, how will it address the dramatic change in the shooter landscape? Game Director Marty Stratton and Creative Director Hugo Martin uncover the classic Doom mechanics they've brought back to create a modern version of an old-school arena shooter.

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The 8 Strangest Kart Racing Games

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Some games are so ripe with potential and innovation that it's inevitable that they lead to a neverending chain of clones. You know the ones. Doom. Civilization. Zork. Grand Theft Auto III. Final Fantasy. Mario Kart. Wait what?

I mean, I know Mario Kart is a great, classic series but it just doesn't seem like the kind of game that developers everywhere would be attempting to shamelessly copy,  but there have been a lot of Mario Kart clones, y'all. And some of them are really, really weird (but not Crash Team Racing because Crash Team Racing is sacred). Let's check out the strangest ones, shall we?

Woody Woodpecker Racing

Replay – Rogue Galaxy

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Replay – Rogue Galaxy

Classics from yesteryear are suddenly new again on PlayStation 4. Our Replay mailbag is overflowing with requests to revisit the PlayStation 2 games Sony is re-releasing on PlayStation 4. We already took a look at the excellent stealth game Mark of Kri, today we're revisiting Rogue Galaxy, an ambitious science-fiction role-playing from developer Level-5.

The game choice comes courtesy of Game Informer friend Zachary Pligge, who donated $1,000 dollars to Game Informer's Extra Life live stream to appear in an episode of Replay. Pligge quickly shows off his knowledge of Rogue Galaxy, and Tim Turi does his best to make as much progress in the opening minutes of the game as he can. Kim Wallace, Game Informer's JRPG expert, is on hand to insight and criticize Turi's should he do something wrong. Rogue Galaxy sadly didn't sell well in Japan or North America, and stands as one of PlayStation 2's most under appreciated games. Here's hoping it finds the audience it deserves on PlayStation 4.

Our final segment in this week's show explores another little known PlayStation 2 game that is often compared to Pokemon. As always, leave us a comment, and let us know what you think of the show and the games featured within it. Also, check out the always amazing Replay fan group on Facebook.