Digital Board Game Spotlight: Three Rad Roll-And-Write Games

about X hours ago from
Digital Board Game Spotlight: Three Rad Roll-And-Write Games

Usually when I play mobile games, I’m only looking to fill a few minutes of downtime, and as such tend to prefer something that’s fast, simple, and well-suited to solo play. Enter tabletop gaming’s roll-and-write genre, which offers a wealth of light and fun experiences built around a handful of dice and unique scoring systems. Roll-and-write games are perfect for mobile, and we’re already seeing some popular titles make the jump.

Today I’m highlighting three games that may not offer the depth of crunchier strategy games, but still provide enough interesting choices and replayability to keep you busy well beyond those few minutes you were initially looking to fill – at least that's been my experience!

Digital Board Game Spotlight is an ongoing series that highlights my favorite digital translations of modern board games. Unlike most modern mobile games, these selections feature traditional up-front pricing, without any time-gates, premium currencies, or ads to ruin the fun. If you're looking for your next mobile fix, look no further.

Digital Board Game Spotlight: Three Rad Roll-And-Write Games

about X hours ago from
Digital Board Game Spotlight: Three Rad Roll-And-Write Games

Usually when I play mobile games, I’m only looking to fill a few minutes of downtime, and as such tend to prefer something that’s fast, simple, and well-suited to solo play. Enter tabletop gaming’s roll-and-write genre, which offers a wealth of light and fun experiences built around a handful of dice and unique scoring systems. Roll-and-write games are perfect for mobile, and we’re already seeing some popular titles make the jump.

Today I’m highlighting three games that may not offer the depth of crunchier strategy games, but still provide enough interesting choices and replayability to keep you busy well beyond those few minutes you were initially looking to fill – at least that's been my experience!

Digital Board Game Spotlight is an ongoing series that highlights my favorite digital translations of modern board games. Unlike most modern mobile games, these selections feature traditional up-front pricing, without any time-gates, premium currencies, or ads to ruin the fun. If you're looking for your next mobile fix, look no further.

Top Of The Table – Jaws

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – Jaws

When adapting any story from one medium to another, the real trick lies in maintaining the tone and spirit of the original, while recognizing the nature of the new platform and capitalizing on what it does well. Whether it’s a comic to a film, a movie to a video game, a toy property to a cartoon, or any other combination, everything falls apart if the adaptation loses touch with its source material. Thankfully, Ravensburger’s board game take on the venerated original Jaws film hits the mark in all the ways that matter. This is a suspenseful game of cat and mouse that celebrates all the best beats of the movie, but also locks into some clever game mechanics to capture the progression of conflict between man and shark.

Top Of The Table – Jaws

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – Jaws

When adapting any story from one medium to another, the real trick lies in maintaining the tone and spirit of the original, while recognizing the nature of the new platform and capitalizing on what it does well. Whether it’s a comic to a film, a movie to a video game, a toy property to a cartoon, or any other combination, everything falls apart if the adaptation loses touch with its source material. Thankfully, Ravensburger’s board game take on the venerated original Jaws film hits the mark in all the ways that matter. This is a suspenseful game of cat and mouse that celebrates all the best beats of the movie, but also locks into some clever game mechanics to capture the progression of conflict between man and shark.

A Look Inside Monster Hunter World: Iceborne’s New Outpost, Seliana

about X hours ago from
A Look Inside Monster Hunter World: Iceborne’s New Outpost, Seliana

There’s a reason that “hunter” is half of Monster Hunter’s title: Admiring monsters from afar might be satisfying in its own way, but the whole point is getting in the faces of these giant beasts and battling against seemingly insurmountable odds. Once you’re done, you get to take your trophies and craft new weapons and armor to do it all over again. And for that, you need a base of operations. Monster Hunter World: Iceborne introduces an all-new region to explore, as well as a place to call home. Seliana may not have a whole lot of history (yet), but Capcom relied on its experience – and player feedback – when it came time to build this outpost on the edge of the known world.

Iceborne takes place after the events of the main campaign, when the expedition notices a mass migration from the New World to an unknown destination. Shortly afterward, it’s clear that the monsters are flocking to an undiscovered continent – and with that, we’re off. Unlike Astera, the hub world in Monster Hunter: World, this new base of operations is just getting started. Astera is an established outpost, having been built up over several generations. Seliana was largely constructed in advance and flown out via enormous balloons.  

A Look Inside Monster Hunter World: Iceborne’s New Outpost, Seliana

about X hours ago from
A Look Inside Monster Hunter World: Iceborne’s New Outpost, Seliana

There’s a reason that “hunter” is half of Monster Hunter’s title: Admiring monsters from afar might be satisfying in its own way, but the whole point is getting in the faces of these giant beasts and battling against seemingly insurmountable odds. Once you’re done, you get to take your trophies and craft new weapons and armor to do it all over again. And for that, you need a base of operations. Monster Hunter World: Iceborne introduces an all-new region to explore, as well as a place to call home. Seliana may not have a whole lot of history (yet), but Capcom relied on its experience – and player feedback – when it came time to build this outpost on the edge of the known world.

Iceborne takes place after the events of the main campaign, when the expedition notices a mass migration from the New World to an unknown destination. Shortly afterward, it’s clear that the monsters are flocking to an undiscovered continent – and with that, we’re off. Unlike Astera, the hub world in Monster Hunter: World, this new base of operations is just getting started. Astera is an established outpost, having been built up over several generations. Seliana was largely constructed in advance and flown out via enormous balloons.  

Teppen Strikes With A Surprise Capcom-Based Card Game

about X hours ago from
Teppen Strikes With A Surprise Capcom-Based Card Game

Have you ever wanted to see if Nergigante could beat Albert Wesker in a fight? How about Chun-Li versus a Rathalos? Now you can live that dream, as Capcom's IPs join under one roof in Teppen, GungHo's free-to-play strategy collectible card game on iOS and Android. It embraces real-time decision making and timing, as there are no "turns," but rather two players playing simultaneously on a three-lane board. In stark contrast to most digital card games, twitch reflexes actually play a role, both in getting units out to the board efficiently and especially for combat considerations. Big flashy ultimate abilities take the center stage (each hero has three to pick from) and are reminiscent of filling up your gauge in a Street Fighter game to unleash hell.

Teppen Strikes With A Surprise Capcom-Based Card Game

about X hours ago from
Teppen Strikes With A Surprise Capcom-Based Card Game

Have you ever wanted to see if Nergigante could beat Albert Wesker in a fight? How about Chun-Li versus a Rathalos? Now you can live that dream, as Capcom's IPs join under one roof in Teppen, GungHo's free-to-play strategy collectible card game on iOS and Android. It embraces real-time decision making and timing, as there are no "turns," but rather two players playing simultaneously on a three-lane board. In stark contrast to most digital card games, twitch reflexes actually play a role, both in getting units out to the board efficiently and especially for combat considerations. Big flashy ultimate abilities take the center stage (each hero has three to pick from) and are reminiscent of filling up your gauge in a Street Fighter game to unleash hell.

Clash Royale's Latest Update Is A Game Changer

about X hours ago from
Clash Royale's Latest Update Is A Game Changer

Clash Royale has become a part of my morning routine. I wake up, get ready for the day, grab a tasty Starbucks beverage, and play a few matches of Clash Royale before heading to work. I've been hooked on this competitive game for the last three years, and now, thanks to Supercell's latest update, I find myself playing it more than ever.

Drawing heavy inspiration from Fortnite, Clash Royale now offers seasonal play. Over the span of 35 days, the first season (dubbed "The Flood") introduces a new card, arena, and, wait for it, a battle pass (called Pass Royale) that players can purchase to earn cool new things like tower skins, additional chests, and trade tokens. It also delivers the ability to queue up chests (yeah, I agree that should be free in the base game), and unlimited continues in challenge events.

Yes, it stinks that I now have to spend $4.99 every 35 days to get the game's most desirable loot, but I mostly appreciate the update since I have something new to play for. The items of note are dangled in front of me like a carrot on a stick, and I just have to play extensively to get them. With the Pass Royale, Supercell is clearly targeting a player like me, who has maxed out all of the cards in my deck and hasn't had to spend money on the game for a good year.

Clash Royale's Latest Update Is A Game Changer

about X hours ago from
Clash Royale's Latest Update Is A Game Changer

Clash Royale has become a part of my morning routine. I wake up, get ready for the day, grab a tasty Starbucks beverage, and play a few matches of Clash Royale before heading to work. I've been hooked on this competitive game for the last three years, and now, thanks to Supercell's latest update, I find myself playing it more than ever.

Drawing heavy inspiration from Fortnite, Clash Royale now offers seasonal play. Over the span of 35 days, the first season (dubbed "The Flood") introduces a new card, arena, and, wait for it, a battle pass (called Pass Royale) that players can purchase to earn cool new things like tower skins, additional chests, and trade tokens. It also delivers the ability to queue up chests (yeah, I agree that should be free in the base game), and unlimited continues in challenge events.

Yes, it stinks that I now have to spend $4.99 every 35 days to get the game's most desirable loot, but I mostly appreciate the update since I have something new to play for. The items of note are dangled in front of me like a carrot on a stick, and I just have to play extensively to get them. With the Pass Royale, Supercell is clearly targeting a player like me, who has maxed out all of the cards in my deck and hasn't had to spend money on the game for a good year.