Super Replay – God Hand Episode 19: How To Poison Coworker

about X hours ago from
Super Replay – God Hand Episode 19: How To Poison Coworker

After a festive holiday season, Game Informer's annual 12.31 Super Replay usually brings suffering. In years past, this day has kicked off complete playthroughs of stinkers like Overblood, Overblood 2, Blue Stinger, Illbleed, Raw Danger, Martian Gothic: Unification, Sonic the Hedgehog, and Vampire Hunter D.

Figuring out which game will be honored with this spot is a stressful decision that usually takes a full year to figure out. That wasn't the case this year. The community figured it out for us. We had the somewhat official I Watched the Entire Overblood Super Replay group vote for a Super Replay earlier this year. With hundreds of votes cast, the poll ended in a tie between Killer 7 and God Hand. Rather than just flipping a coin to see which one we would do, I decided to record both of them. We knocked out Killer 7 earlier this year, and almost rolled right into God Hand, but couldn't find a window to get it done in a productive way. I shelved the Super Replay until 12.31. It was one of the games I was considering years ago for this spot anyway.

Replay – The Bourne Conspiracy

about X hours ago from
Replay – The Bourne Conspiracy

In this episode of Replay, the Game Informer crew spends some quality time getting to know Jason Bourne and his quick-time events. Robert Ludlum's The Bourne Conspiracy is a video game adaptation of the feature film that expands upon the story and is created by High Moon Studios. We're not sure exactly what content is new, but we do know that Bourne loves punching and kicking people, and when he gets the chance, he finishes them off with an ordinary object that is within his reach.

We don't spend much time with this game before moving on to Creative Assembly's Viking: Battle for Asgard. We spend a few minutes being confused by this game, and then settle into a nice groove with the terrible Gears of War clone, Quantum Theory. That game has Replay written all over it.

As always, enjoy our silly little episode, and we'll see you again in seven days.

Replay – The Bourne Conspiracy

about X hours ago from
Replay – The Bourne Conspiracy

In this episode of Replay, the Game Informer crew spends some quality time getting to know Jason Bourne and his quick-time events. Robert Ludlum's The Bourne Conspiracy is a video game adaptation of the feature film that expands upon the story and is created by High Moon Studios. We're not sure exactly what content is new, but we do know that Bourne loves punching and kicking people, and when he gets the chance, he finishes them off with an ordinary object that is within his reach.

We don't spend much time with this game before moving on to Creative Assembly's Viking: Battle for Asgard. We spend a few minutes being confused by this game, and then settle into a nice groove with the terrible Gears of War clone, Quantum Theory. That game has Replay written all over it.

As always, enjoy our silly little episode, and we'll see you again in seven days.

Everything You Need To Know About Ghost Recon Breakpoint

about X hours ago from
Everything You Need To Know About Ghost Recon Breakpoint

Launched two years ago, Ghost Recon Wildlands catapulted the longtime Tom Clancy series in a new trajectory armed with an expansive (some might say excessive) open-world, untethered cooperative play for up to four players, an evolving experience that is still being updated to this day. The same development team that shipped Wildlands and delivered 19 title updates in the last two years has ballooned to more than 1,000 developers, and the team has some ambitious and surprising plans for their follow-up. Here is everything you need to know about Ghost Recon Breakpoint. 

Ghost Recon has always been set in real-world locations during fictitious geopolitical skirmishes. Over the last 17 years, we’ve fought through Eastern Europe, Africa, South America, and even along the United States border. Now, the special operatives are going off the grid to an island that doesn’t really exist. 

Auroa is a sprawling, make-believe island in the Pacific Ocean. This giant, geographically diverse open world’s closest comparison is probably New Zealand, with snowy mountain peaks, sandy beaches, jungles, and volcanos. This picturesque location is home to Skell Technology, a corporation that develops advanced A.I. and drones. Nomad’s team of Ghosts are sent in after the world mysteriously loses communication with the island.

Ubisoft Explains Why Ghost Recon Breakpoint Has A Fictional Setting

about X hours ago from
Ubisoft Explains Why Ghost Recon Breakpoint Has A Fictional Setting

Since its debut back in 2001, the Ghost Recon series has focused on fictitious geopolitical skirmishes around the globe. Russia, East Africa, North Korea, Columbia, Bolivia – it doesn't matter where the job is, when U.S. interests need protecting, the clandestine operators who call themselves Ghosts slip behind enemy lines and do the dirty work. 

Not every country hosting the fictitious wet work of this U.S. Special Forces division has been happy about its portrayal. Chagrined by Ghost Recon Wildlands' depiction of Bolivia as a corrupt country overrun by drug cartels, the nation filed an official complaint with the French embassy in La Paz. The blowback could be seen as the reason Ubisoft set Ghost Recon Breakpoint on a fictional island in the Pacific Ocean, but the developers say they have other justifications for the change as well.

Ubisoft Explains Why Ghost Recon Breakpoint Has A Fictional Setting

about X hours ago from
Ubisoft Explains Why Ghost Recon Breakpoint Has A Fictional Setting

Since its debut back in 2001, the Ghost Recon series has focused on fictitious geopolitical skirmishes around the globe. Russia, East Africa, North Korea, Columbia, Bolivia – it doesn't matter where the job is, when U.S. interests need protecting, the clandestine operators who call themselves Ghosts slip behind enemy lines and do the dirty work. 

Not every country hosting the fictitious wet work of this U.S. Special Forces division has been happy about its portrayal. Chagrined by Ghost Recon Wildlands' depiction of Bolivia as a corrupt country overrun by drug cartels, the nation filed an official complaint with the French embassy in La Paz. The blowback could be seen as the reason Ubisoft set Ghost Recon Breakpoint on a fictional island in the Pacific Ocean, but the developers say they have other justifications for the change as well.

Everything You Need To Know About Ghost Recon Breakpoint

about X hours ago from
Everything You Need To Know About Ghost Recon Breakpoint

Launched two years ago, Ghost Recon Wildlands catapulted the longtime Tom Clancy series in a new trajectory armed with an expansive (some might say excessive) open-world, untethered cooperative play for up to four players, an evolving experience that is still being updated to this day. The same development team that shipped Wildlands and delivered 19 title updates in the last two years has ballooned to more than 1,000 developers, and the team has some ambitious and surprising plans for their follow-up. Here is everything you need to know about Ghost Recon Breakpoint. 

Ghost Recon has always been set in real-world locations during fictitious geopolitical skirmishes. Over the last 17 years, we’ve fought through Eastern Europe, Africa, South America, and even along the United States border. Now, the special operatives are going off the grid to an island that doesn’t really exist. 

Auroa is a sprawling, make-believe island in the Pacific Ocean. This giant, geographically diverse open world’s closest comparison is probably New Zealand, with snowy mountain peaks, sandy beaches, jungles, and volcanos. This picturesque location is home to Skell Technology, a corporation that develops advanced A.I. and drones. Nomad’s team of Ghosts are sent in after the world mysteriously loses communication with the island.

Check Out Transformer's TCG War for Cybertron Siege Sergeant Skywarp

about X hours ago from
Check Out Transformer's TCG War for Cybertron Siege Sergeant Skywarp

War for Cybertron Siege for the Transformers TCG hits later next month, and we've got an exclusive preview of one of the new cards to share, featuring some new mechanics. Similar to traps or hidden abilities in other card games, "secret actions" allow you to flip and surprise your opponent with a variety of effects. Let's check out Sergeant Skywarp!

Transformers Trading Card Game lead designer Ken Nagle gives us some tips on getting the most out of secret actions and the new card below:

Sergeant Skywarp is a master of Secret Action, a new kind of battle card in War for Cyberton: Siege. Since secret actions are played face down, your opponent won't know what that secret action does. Since most Secret Actions trigger on the opponent's turn, your opponent must step lightly or risk setting off the secret.

Check Out Transformer's TCG War for Cybertron Siege Sergeant Skywarp

about X hours ago from
Check Out Transformer's TCG War for Cybertron Siege Sergeant Skywarp

War for Cybertron Siege for the Transformers TCG hits later next month, and we've got an exclusive preview of one of the new cards to share, featuring some new mechanics. Similar to traps or hidden abilities in other card games, "secret actions" allow you to flip and surprise your opponent with a variety of effects. Let's check out Sergeant Skywarp!

Transformers Trading Card Game lead designer Ken Nagle gives us some tips on getting the most out of secret actions and the new card below:

Sergeant Skywarp is a master of Secret Action, a new kind of battle card in War for Cyberton: Siege. Since secret actions are played face down, your opponent won't know what that secret action does. Since most Secret Actions trigger on the opponent's turn, your opponent must step lightly or risk setting off the secret.

Exclusive Hands-On Impressions Of Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3

about X hours ago from
Exclusive Hands-On Impressions Of Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3

Marvel Ultimate Alliance fans have been begging for a new entry in the comic-themed action/RPG series for over a decade now. In a few months, those fans will finally get their hands on Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: The Black Order. However, the game industry has grown a great deal in the last 10 years, which leaves us with a few questions. Will The Black Order scratch that inch fans have had for years? Does the Marvel Ultimate Alliance formula need to evolve? Can it do both?

We’re ready to answer many of those questions. During our recent cover story trip to Nintendo’s headquarters, we spent several hours with the game. Then Game Informer editors Matt Miller and Ben Reeves sat down to talk about their impressions.

Reeves: To start, maybe I should share my enthusiasm for the series. I’ve been a comic-book reader for for nearly as long as I’ve been a gamer, so I was in the bag for these games the second they were announced. I’ve been a fan of this series since the original X-Men Legends games; I played them all, and loved gathering my friends around the couch for all-night superhero battles. I know you’re a big comic guy too, and I think you have a similar affection for this series, so what was your general impression walking in and playing The Black Order for the first time?