Biggest Games Releasing In November 2020

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Biggest Games Releasing In November 2020

October is coming to an end, which means a new month ahead filled with even more games to enjoy. With the launch of next-gen gaming with the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X and S, November is an exciting month for diving into fresh adventures. Though some titles have been delayed, here are the biggest games releasing in November 2020. 

Whether you fancy yourself a Viking conqueror in Assassin's Creed Valhalla or want to try your hand as a crime boss in the latest Yakuza game, November has a plethora of gaming experiences to choose from. When looking to allocate your time (and your wallet), here is everything you need to know about the month ahead. 

Gears Tactics is officially launching just as the news hit that Gears POP!, another spinoff from the Gears of War franchise, announced its servers are shutting down for good. Hopefully, Tactics will fare better. Godfall is also another huge pick, mostly because it seems that players are still confused as to what this particular title even has to offer, even still. 

Blair Witch: From Iconic Horror Movie To Immersive VR Experience

about X hours ago from
Blair Witch: From Iconic Horror Movie To Immersive VR Experience

When the Blair Witch game was first announced, fans of the iconic horror movie franchise were eager to see what the story would be like. When Layers of Fear studio Bloober Team was confirmed to be at the helm, that excitement grew. While Blair Witch as a game was met with mixed reception due to its length and its mechanics meant to confuse the player, this horror adventure carved a unique niche for itself within the genre. Now that it's in VR, those scares are amplified and the in-game choices matter more than ever. 

We sat down with Daniel Engelhardt, Lionsgate Senior VP of Interactive Venture & Games, to talk about how this partnership with Bloober came to be and why the jump to VR despite the mixed reviews. Usually, when two companies come together over an IP, the process is long, complicated, and full of negotiations. Engelhardt tells us that this wasn't the case with Blair Witch. In fact, it was coffee and mutual fandom that made this a match made in heaven (or Hell, if we're talking horror). 

"The idea of a Blair Witch game was really natural, funny enough," he tells us. "The head of Bloober is a huge fan of the Blair Witch movies and I'm a huge fan of their games like Layers of Fear. So it became this 'I'm a fan, you're fan, let's do this' type of situation. We actually started talking about this concept just over a coffee." 

Blair Witch: From Iconic Horror Movie To Immersive VR Experience

about X hours ago from
Blair Witch: From Iconic Horror Movie To Immersive VR Experience

When the Blair Witch game was first announced, fans of the iconic horror movie franchise were eager to see what the story would be like. When Layers of Fear studio Bloober Team was confirmed to be at the helm, that excitement grew. While Blair Witch as a game was met with mixed reception due to its length and its mechanics meant to confuse the player, this horror adventure carved a unique niche for itself within the genre. Now that it's in VR, those scares are amplified and the in-game choices matter more than ever. 

We sat down with Daniel Engelhardt, Lionsgate Senior VP of Interactive Venture & Games, to talk about how this partnership with Bloober came to be and why the jump to VR despite the mixed reviews. Usually, when two companies come together over an IP, the process is long, complicated, and full of negotiations. Engelhardt tells us that this wasn't the case with Blair Witch. In fact, it was coffee and mutual fandom that made this a match made in heaven (or Hell, if we're talking horror). 

"The idea of a Blair Witch game was really natural, funny enough," he tells us. "The head of Bloober is a huge fan of the Blair Witch movies and I'm a huge fan of their games like Layers of Fear. So it became this 'I'm a fan, you're fan, let's do this' type of situation. We actually started talking about this concept just over a coffee." 

Meet The Villains In Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales

about X hours ago from
Meet The Villains In Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales

Hey there, true believers! We only have a couple weeks to go before swinging into Insomniac’s latest Spider-Man game, and we heard that a few baddies are already making trouble in Miles’ neighborhood. It's up to you to stop them. But in order to defeat your enemy, you first need to know your enemy. My uncle Ben once told me that. So, with that in mind, let’s take a closer look at the Tinkerer and the energy company Roxxon, so we can see what makes those goons tick. Here is everything you need to know about the villains in Miles’ upcoming game.

In the comics: First introduced in the ‘70s, Roxxon Energy Corporation is primarily an oil and gas company with offices around the world. One of the largest conglomerates on Earth, the company generates billions of dollars in profits each year. However, over the decades, Roxxon has been involved in all manner of morally-questionable business practices and outright criminal activity – usually centered on the exploitation of various energy-rich resources.

In the game: Roxxon has moved into Harlem and is currently testing a new form of “clean” energy called Nuform. The big face of the company in Insomniac’s game is Simon Krieger, the director of the Nuform project, who puts on a nice smile for the cameras but clearly harbors sinister intentions.

Meet The Villains In Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales

about X hours ago from
Meet The Villains In Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales

Hey there, true believers! We only have a couple weeks to go before swinging into Insomniac’s latest Spider-Man game, and we heard that a few baddies are already making trouble in Miles’ neighborhood. It's up to you to stop them. But in order to defeat your enemy, you first need to know your enemy. My uncle Ben once told me that. So, with that in mind, let’s take a closer look at the Tinkerer and the energy company Roxxon, so we can see what makes those goons tick. Here is everything you need to know about the villains in Miles’ upcoming game.

In the comics: First introduced in the ‘70s, Roxxon Energy Corporation is primarily an oil and gas company with offices around the world. One of the largest conglomerates on Earth, the company generates billions of dollars in profits each year. However, over the decades, Roxxon has been involved in all manner of morally-questionable business practices and outright criminal activity – usually centered on the exploitation of various energy-rich resources.

In the game: Roxxon has moved into Harlem and is currently testing a new form of “clean” energy called Nuform. The big face of the company in Insomniac’s game is Simon Krieger, the director of the Nuform project, who puts on a nice smile for the cameras but clearly harbors sinister intentions.

Everything You Need To Know About Apex Legends Season 7

about X hours ago from
Everything You Need To Know About Apex Legends Season 7

Season 7 of Apex Legends releases next week, and in advance of the big launch, we got to spend time with some behind-the-scenes content to see what the future holds. Here are the awesome features on the horizon for Respawn’s multiplayer online shooter.

That unidentified floating object just outside of the Kings Canyon Airbase has been revealed. Pack your things, champions! We’re going to Olympus – a flying metropolis that overlooks the planet Psamathe. Olympus is larger than Kings Canyon and smaller than World’s Edge. Nevertheless, the city is brimming with vibrant shopping centers, lavish estates, industrial docks, and glass skyscrapers. There’s also the Rift, a location that will likely draw your attention the minute you load into a match. The Rift is a large, unstable singularity that players can use to teleport themselves to select locations across the map. With a variety of architectural structures, interconnected highways, and deathpits that lead to the astral abyss below, Olympus brings new visuals and level mechanics that are bound to impress.

Everything You Need To Know About Apex Legends Season 7

about X hours ago from
Everything You Need To Know About Apex Legends Season 7

Season 7 of Apex Legends releases next week, and in advance of the big launch, we got to spend time with some behind-the-scenes content to see what the future holds. Here are the awesome features on the horizon for Respawn’s multiplayer online shooter.

That unidentified floating object just outside of the Kings Canyon Airbase has been revealed. Pack your things, champions! We’re going to Olympus – a flying metropolis that overlooks the planet Psamathe. Olympus is larger than Kings Canyon and smaller than World’s Edge. Nevertheless, the city is brimming with vibrant shopping centers, lavish estates, industrial docks, and glass skyscrapers. There’s also the Rift, a location that will likely draw your attention the minute you load into a match. The Rift is a large, unstable singularity that players can use to teleport themselves to select locations across the map. With a variety of architectural structures, interconnected highways, and deathpits that lead to the astral abyss below, Olympus brings new visuals and level mechanics that are bound to impress.

How Bots Could Ruin Games Forever

about X hours ago from
How Bots Could Ruin Games Forever

What’s scarier than monsters, ghosts, and things that go bump in the night? We’ve all seen bots in games by now. I don’t mean players setting up systems to run to farm crafting materials in predictable routes or to play cards in a set order; I’m talking about bots designed by developers. Now, you might be saying to yourself, “What’s wrong with bots?” Bots can fill lobbies to make sure games can launch, they can make matchmaking take a lot less time, and hey, it's always fun shooting down an automated opponent and getting a free kill in a field with dozens of human opponents running around. But there’s a lot more to these innocuous A.I. additions, and they have implications for all kinds of multiplayer experiences. With the trends we’re seeing in data acquisition, user privacy, and monetization models, bots are headed for dangerous implementation.

How Bots Could Ruin Games Forever

about X hours ago from
How Bots Could Ruin Games Forever

What’s scarier than monsters, ghosts, and things that go bump in the night? We’ve all seen bots in games by now. I don’t mean players setting up systems to run to farm crafting materials in predictable routes or to play cards in a set order; I’m talking about bots designed by developers. Now, you might be saying to yourself, “What’s wrong with bots?” Bots can fill lobbies to make sure games can launch, they can make matchmaking take a lot less time, and hey, it's always fun shooting down an automated opponent and getting a free kill in a field with dozens of human opponents running around. But there’s a lot more to these innocuous A.I. additions, and they have implications for all kinds of multiplayer experiences. With the trends we’re seeing in data acquisition, user privacy, and monetization models, bots are headed for dangerous implementation.

Ghostrunner On Console Is The Worst Way To Play

about X hours ago from
Ghostrunner On Console Is The Worst Way To Play

Based on what I've seen of reviews and preview builds, I feel like you might have a good time playing Ghostrunner on PC. However, I've been playing the game on Xbox One. I can assure you the game I'm playing on console cannot be the same game people are loving on PC. After several hours playing the first-person platformer from One More Level, it's painfully clear this game was not made with consoles in mind, since my time has been plagued by clumsy controls and imprecise platforming. 

Ghostrunner is built around speed and agility. Its opening CG cutscene shows the robot protagonist (aptly named "Ghostrunner") barreling through a neon-drenched cyberpunk city, chopping bad guys in half, and flying through the air. It's one of those scenes that plays before a lot of games, seemingly showing the character pulling off stylish feats that players will never actually perform in the game itself. But for the most part, Ghostrunner delivers on its opening cinematic's promise; from the minute you're given control, you too are jumping high in the air, dashing around foes, and cutting them into bloody bits. It looks cool. It feels terrible.