What Do We Know About Star Trek: Picard?

about X hours ago from
What Do We Know About Star Trek: Picard?

CBS has been actively working to revitalize the Star Trek brand in recent years, especially through the roll-out of a number of new series, including Star Trek: Discovery, which recently completed its second season, and ran on CBS’ All-Access streaming service.

We’ve known for some time that Patrick Stewart is involved in another series, focusing on the character of Jean-Luc Picard, who he played for seven seasons of Star Trek: The Next Generation, not to mention several follow-up feature films. Yesterday brought us the first look at a teaser trailer for the new series, which began to paint a picture of what to expect from the series. Check the trailer out at the bottom of this story if you haven’t had a chance to watch it yet.

While it’s only a little over a minute, there are some potent details to unpack, offering some significant hints about the plot, themes, and setting of the upcoming Star Trek: Picard.

What Do We Know About Star Trek: Picard?

about X hours ago from
What Do We Know About Star Trek: Picard?

CBS has been actively working to revitalize the Star Trek brand in recent years, especially through the roll-out of a number of new series, including Star Trek: Discovery, which recently completed its second season, and ran on CBS’ All-Access streaming service.

We’ve known for some time that Patrick Stewart is involved in another series, focusing on the character of Jean-Luc Picard, who he played for seven seasons of Star Trek: The Next Generation, not to mention several follow-up feature films. Yesterday brought us the first look at a teaser trailer for the new series, which began to paint a picture of what to expect from the series. Check the trailer out at the bottom of this story if you haven’t had a chance to watch it yet.

While it’s only a little over a minute, there are some potent details to unpack, offering some significant hints about the plot, themes, and setting of the upcoming Star Trek: Picard.

Rage 2 Is At Its Best When It Channels Dishonored

about X hours ago from
Rage 2 Is At Its Best When It Channels Dishonored

This past week Rage 2 released to thunderous a mild and polite smattering of applause. In spite of the game's fantastic combat system, its world, story, vehicular gameplay, and pretty much everything else outside of charging into the fray with mutants and bandits leaves much to be desired. However, in spite of those failings, it's worth expanding on just how great Rage 2's combat system is and why I hope this troubled outing isn't the last we've seen of it.

When Gears Of War and Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare changed the industry's approach to shooters, resulting in a years-long bombardment of the genre that was obsessed with gritty realism or embracing bleak edgy material, a lot of the more frantic shooters went away for a bit. However, to say that Rage 2's gunplay is merely an arcadey throwback to the likes of Doom, Quake, Unreal Tournament, and other fantastical retro bloodbaths is a disservice to what this surprise sequel does right. Wolfenstein reinvented itself by bearing down on a tragic, epic story featuring well thought out characters and dollops of wacky, blood-soaked shenanigans. The 2016 Doom reboot didn't really reinvent itself as much as it put its best elements forward and modernized them for a new generation, forcing players to become a constant whirlwind of shotgun-toting death if they have any hope of surviving the horrors of hell.

Rage 2 Is At Its Best When It Channels Dishonored

about X hours ago from
Rage 2 Is At Its Best When It Channels Dishonored

This past week Rage 2 released to thunderous a mild and polite smattering of applause. In spite of the game's fantastic combat system, its world, story, vehicular gameplay, and pretty much everything else outside of charging into the fray with mutants and bandits leaves much to be desired. However, in spite of those failings, it's worth expanding on just how great Rage 2's combat system is and why I hope this troubled outing isn't the last we've seen of it.

When Gears Of War and Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare changed the industry's approach to shooters, resulting in a years-long bombardment of the genre that was obsessed with gritty realism or embracing bleak edgy material, a lot of the more frantic shooters went away for a bit. However, to say that Rage 2's gunplay is merely an arcadey throwback to the likes of Doom, Quake, Unreal Tournament, and other fantastical retro bloodbaths is a disservice to what this surprise sequel does right. Wolfenstein reinvented itself by bearing down on a tragic, epic story featuring well thought out characters and dollops of wacky, blood-soaked shenanigans. The 2016 Doom reboot didn't really reinvent itself as much as it put its best elements forward and modernized them for a new generation, forcing players to become a constant whirlwind of shotgun-toting death if they have any hope of surviving the horrors of hell.

Interview with Blizzard President J. Allen Brack

about X hours ago from
Interview with Blizzard President J. Allen Brack

When Blizzard co-founder Mike Morhaime announced his retirement last year, the mantle passed to new president J. Allen Brack. After years over overseeing World of Warcraft, Brack now brings his years of experience to lead Blizzard into a new era. I sat down with him to hear his thoughts and Blizzard's process and we can expect in the future.

Previously, your main focus was World of Warcraft. Now you have a new focus: watching over all of Blizzard's games. How has the job transition gone?

I mean I’m a fan of all the things that Blizzard’s done. I’ve put thousands and thousands of hours into Diablo. Lots of time into StarCraft, both StarCraft when it first came out and StarCraft II. I’ve been a fan of all the games that Blizzard has made even before I worked at Blizzard. It’s not easy to love all my children equally, I guess as it were. In terms of the job, I think it’s been pretty hard honestly. But one of the things we’ve said is that we have more games we’re working on now than in any other point in the company’s history. And that’s very exciting. Being able to see those products, see those games, see those things that the team’s really excited about – that’s what gets me up in the morning.

Observation And The Horror Of A New Perspective

about X hours ago from
Observation And The Horror Of A New Perspective

Note: Some mild spoilers for both Observation and the 2018 horror film Hereditary 

There's this nugget of wisdom that writers like to say whenever the subject of innovation comes up: every story has already been told. The statement is probably right, but it isn't even one of defeat. Instead, what it implies is that even though every story has been told, the real, exhilarating challenge for creators is finding new ways to tell the story. My Own Private Idaho, for example, is a version of Henry IV that uses Portland and modern language to tackle universal themes about duty, betrayal, and friendship. Or, for something more gamey, I think there's a sound argument to be made that The Last Of Us is just another version of Cormac McCarthy's The Road. The specificity of the events in each story is different but the broad strokes are the same in the end: two characters traversing an unkind world, struggling to find a connection with one another as much as they are struggling to survive. 

Observation And The Horror Of A New Perspective

about X hours ago from
Observation And The Horror Of A New Perspective

Note: Some mild spoilers for both Observation and the 2018 horror film Hereditary 

There's this nugget of wisdom that writers like to say whenever the subject of innovation comes up: every story has already been told. The statement is probably right, but it isn't even one of defeat. Instead, what it implies is that even though every story has been told, the real, exhilarating challenge for creators is finding new ways to tell the story. My Own Private Idaho, for example, is a version of Henry IV that uses Portland and modern language to tackle universal themes about duty, betrayal, and friendship. Or, for something more gamey, I think there's a sound argument to be made that The Last Of Us is just another version of Cormac McCarthy's The Road. The specificity of the events in each story is different but the broad strokes are the same in the end: two characters traversing an unkind world, struggling to find a connection with one another as much as they are struggling to survive. 

The Top 10 Marvel Games Of All Time

about X hours ago from
The Top 10 Marvel Games Of All Time

Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: The Black Order releases July 19, but if you’re itching to jump into the role of one of Marvel’s legendary heroes there are already a number of great Marvel-themed games on the market. In honor of our Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3 cover story in the June issue of Game Informer, we’ve assembled the ultimate list of Marvel games every comic fan should play.

Genesis • 1995 The X-Men seemed like the biggest superheroes in the ‘90s. Young fans around the country dreamed of being one of Marvel’s merry mutants, and Headgames’ co-op friendly side-scrolling action game helped scratch that itch. Players control Beast, Cyclops, Gambit, Nightcrawler, Psylocke, and Wolverine as they travel across the world on a mission to destroy the Phalanx virus and save everyone from becoming techno-organic slaves. Each hero has their own unique set of powers, which aided them in combat and affects how they traversed the environment, further encouraging replay.

The Top 10 Marvel Games Of All Time

about X hours ago from
The Top 10 Marvel Games Of All Time

Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: The Black Order releases July 19, but if you’re itching to jump into the role of one of Marvel’s legendary heroes there are already a number of great Marvel-themed games on the market. In honor of our Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3 cover story in the June issue of Game Informer, we’ve assembled the ultimate list of Marvel games every comic fan should play.

Genesis • 1995 The X-Men seemed like the biggest superheroes in the ‘90s. Young fans around the country dreamed of being one of Marvel’s merry mutants, and Headgames’ co-op friendly side-scrolling action game helped scratch that itch. Players control Beast, Cyclops, Gambit, Nightcrawler, Psylocke, and Wolverine as they travel across the world on a mission to destroy the Phalanx virus and save everyone from becoming techno-organic slaves. Each hero has their own unique set of powers, which aided them in combat and affects how they traversed the environment, further encouraging replay.

The Destiny 2 Zero Hour Interview

about X hours ago from
The Destiny 2 Zero Hour Interview

In a game as expansive as Destiny 2, a number of individual teams work in concert to try and create something meaningful and exciting for players. Even as one group works on improvements for the competitive Crucible, another group is hard at work on an upcoming raid. In the wake of one of the game’s biggest recent surprises, the content for Zero Hour, a surprise quest with a harrowing, secret mission connected to it, we wanted to take a behind-the-scenes look with the team within the broader Bungie development team that pulled it all together.

Our questions were addressed by a number of different team members at Bungie, and together, their answers paint a fascinating picture of what it takes to bring this kind of content into the game.

What were the seeds that led to the Zero Hour mission? Did you start with a story conceit and develop from there? Was it that you knew you wanted, in part, to use the old Tower space? Or something else?