24 Tips To Help You Become The Ultimate Spider-Man

about X hours ago from
24 Tips To Help You Become The Ultimate Spider-Man

Spider-Man is an open-world experience that offers plenty of depth in its web swinging, combat, and activities. We've assembled a guide that will help you navigate all of this content proficiently. There's no wrong way through it, but we offer plenty of suggestions that will make it easier and more enjoyable. Before reading any of the tips below, we recommend playing through an hour or two of the game to get an understanding of the gameplay and how the content rolls out.

The Best Way to Handle Side Activities Once you obtain a backpack, you’ll likely feel compelled to collect all 55 of them as quickly as you can. This is something you can easily do, but I would avoid doing so, as the side activities that appear later in the game are mostly combat focused. Having some of the fun diversionary stuff like the backpacks left in the third act will make the entire experience more enjoyable. I would also save a number of landmarks, and Black Cat missions.

Justin Roiland Shares His Favorite Funny Video Game And The Challenge Of Making Funny Games

about X hours ago from
Justin Roiland Shares His Favorite Funny Video Game And The Challenge Of Making Funny Games

During PAX West 2018, we got a chance to play Trover Saves the Universe from Squanch Games. Squanch was founded by Justin Roiland, the co-creator Rick and Morty, and Tanya Watson, who has a history with Epic and worked on games like Gears of War, Bulletstorm, and Fortnite. After playing the PAX demo of Trover Saves the Universe (which you can find coverage for here) we spoke with Roiland and Watson about the game, and more specifically, the topic of comedy in video games and why it is so hard to make funny video games.

Game Informer: What is the funniest video game?

Roiland: There are so many.

Justin Roiland Shares His Favorite Funny Video Game And The Challenge Of Making Funny Games

about X hours ago from
Justin Roiland Shares His Favorite Funny Video Game And The Challenge Of Making Funny Games

During PAX West 2018, we got a chance to play Trover Saves the Universe from Squanch Games. Squanch was founded by Justin Roiland, the co-creator Rick and Morty, and Tanya Watson, who has a history with Epic and worked on games like Gears of War, Bulletstorm, and Fortnite. After playing the PAX demo of Trover Saves the Universe (which you can find coverage for here) we spoke with Roiland and Watson about the game, and more specifically, the topic of comedy in video games and why it is so hard to make funny video games.

Game Informer: What is the funniest video game?

Roiland: There are so many.

The Essential Elements Every Final Boss Battle Needs

about X hours ago from
The Essential Elements Every Final Boss Battle Needs

The final showdown. The whole journey builds up to this moment, and RPG fans are no stranger to its importance due to the long time investment to get there. We all have our stories: the final bosses that were pushovers, the ones that had three forms and regenerated health just when we thought we were done, and the classic new villain appearing that you didn’t even know you were fighting against the whole time. The final moments of an RPG always stick with me the most; it is what I’ve spent hours upon hours trying to achieve, all rolled up into one epic bout. It can sour the experience by being completely forgettable or provide a powerful adrenaline rush that you can’t wait to boast about to friends the next day.

I’ve been thinking a lot about these finales over the years and how important they are to an RPG. Check any message board and you’re sure to find comments regarding the final boss and their memorability, from defeating all of Sephiroth’s forms in Final Fantasy VII to how many different ways you could approach Chrono Trigger’s Lavos. But what makes a good final boss? As I reflected on this, I realized a lot of my favorites all have certain elements that make them memorable, whether it’s great tension with the antagonist, a challenge that puts all your skills on display, or having a few surprises in store. 

The Essential Elements Every Final Boss Battle Needs

about X hours ago from
The Essential Elements Every Final Boss Battle Needs

The final showdown. The whole journey builds up to this moment, and RPG fans are no stranger to its importance due to the long time investment to get there. We all have our stories: the final bosses that were pushovers, the ones that had three forms and regenerated health just when we thought we were done, and the classic new villain appearing that you didn’t even know you were fighting against the whole time. The final moments of an RPG always stick with me the most; it is what I’ve spent hours upon hours trying to achieve, all rolled up into one epic bout. It can sour the experience by being completely forgettable or provide a powerful adrenaline rush that you can’t wait to boast about to friends the next day.

I’ve been thinking a lot about these finales over the years and how important they are to an RPG. Check any message board and you’re sure to find comments regarding the final boss and their memorability, from defeating all of Sephiroth’s forms in Final Fantasy VII to how many different ways you could approach Chrono Trigger’s Lavos. But what makes a good final boss? As I reflected on this, I realized a lot of my favorites all have certain elements that make them memorable, whether it’s great tension with the antagonist, a challenge that puts all your skills on display, or having a few surprises in store. 

Perkin’ Up: How Consumables Change The Tide Of Battle In Black Ops 4’s Battle Royale

about X hours ago from
Perkin’ Up: How Consumables Change The Tide Of Battle In Black Ops 4’s Battle Royale

Call of Duty: Black Ops 4’s Blackout mode does a lot to differentiate itself from the other battle royale titles out there. While you won’t find hardcore military-simulation realism or building mechanics in the launch version of Blackout, you will find Black Ops’ signature perk power-ups littered across the battlefield. If you’re smart, one of these could be the difference between a crushing defeat and standing triumphant atop a pile of bodies at the end of the match.

Here are some of the powerups you can find scattered throughout the map.

Paranoia Sends out an audible alert when an enemy sets their crosshairs on you.

Perkin’ Up: How Consumables Change The Tide Of Battle In Black Ops 4’s Battle Royale

about X hours ago from
Perkin’ Up: How Consumables Change The Tide Of Battle In Black Ops 4’s Battle Royale

Call of Duty: Black Ops 4’s Blackout mode does a lot to differentiate itself from the other battle royale titles out there. While you won’t find hardcore military-simulation realism or building mechanics in the launch version of Blackout, you will find Black Ops’ signature perk power-ups littered across the battlefield. If you’re smart, one of these could be the difference between a crushing defeat and standing triumphant atop a pile of bodies at the end of the match.

Here are some of the powerups you can find scattered throughout the map.

Paranoia Sends out an audible alert when an enemy sets their crosshairs on you.

We Asked BioWare If Mass Effect Takes Place In Anthem's Universe

about X hours ago from
We Asked BioWare If Mass Effect Takes Place In Anthem's Universe

During PAX West 2018, Anthem's executive producer Mark Darrah and lead producer Mike Gamble presented a panel on the game focusing on how story works and then made themselves available for interviews afterward. We spoke with Darrah and Gamble about what makes Anthem a BioWare game, how story moments fit into a game all about shooting things with friends, if you can truly play alone, and whether or not Anthem technically exists in the Mass Effect universe.

Earlier today you said, “Single-player is kind of a bug, not a feature,” when you were talking about the unique way Anthem delivers story in a multiplayer environment. Can you tell me what you meant by that quote?

Darrah: If I want to play by myself I choose to play by myself. Not that I am forced to play by myself. In a perfect world, if all games could have all features, role-playing games would be able to be played multiplayer. You could bring your friend in and experience the story together, but if I wanted to play with myself I could do that. That’s what I mean. It feels like a restriction. I am stuck with it whether I want it or not in a single-player game. And multiplayer games are actually the same in the other direction. I am stuck with multiplayer whether I want it or not. In a perfect world you want that blended kind of experience.

Breaking Down Blackout’s Vehicles

about X hours ago from
Breaking Down Blackout’s Vehicles

Earlier this week, we revealed the kinds of vehicles Treyarch is bringing to Black Ops 4's battle royale mode, Blackout. However, during our trip, we also got hands-on time with the game to take the vehicles for a spin ourselves and see strategies the developers used with them to surge toward victory.

Here are our impressions of the vehicles, and some helpful hints on how to use them once the Blackout beta hits.

Fast and deadly, the ATV is the perfect vehicle for roaming the hilly countryside bits of Blackout’s map. One of the strategies Treyarch discussed is squads tracking down ATVs and then moving together in formation across the map, speeding by firefights and picking up loot until they’re forced to fight when the circle closes in during the endgame. The ATVs are, unsurprisingly, the easiest and smoothest rides on the map, though the tradeoff is that they’re also the most vulnerable. All it takes is a well-placed shot with a sniper rifle to end your off-roading spree, so keep that in mind as you roll about.

Everything You Need To Know About Zombies In Blackout

about X hours ago from
Everything You Need To Know About Zombies In Blackout

Zombies aren’t a concept that comes to mind when thinking of the battle royale genre. If Treyarch has its way, Blackout will change that. Black Ops 4 brings the series’ signature mode to battle royale. Well, pieces of it at least.

"Blackout is intended to celebrate the entire legacy of the series, not just the content we’ve created over the years but the fans and what they love,” says co-studio head Dan Bunting.  With much of Blackout’s map literally made out of remixed versions of multiplayer maps from previous entries, and its progression system hinging on unlocking favorite characters from the franchise, it would seem odder to leave zombies out of the equation than anything else.