Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First Six Hours

about X hours ago from
Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First Six Hours

Last year, over the course of four months, we played through Shenmue for the Dreamcast in its entirety. It was an experimental video series, with an undefined schedule that allowed us to take in all the feedback for each episode by reading and responding to comments in (almost) real time. The experiment was a success! So we immediately decided (after playing through Dark Souls III, Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon, Shadow of the Colossus, and Resident Evil 4) that there was no time like the present to return to Yu Suzuki's masterpiece. For the sequel, we're playing the Xbox version that was published by Microsoft in 2002.

In the first episode we explore the city a little bit, make a friend with a fellow capsule toy collector, and get all our stuff stolen. There's also a lady who forgot to finish getting dressed who really likes her motorcycle. In episode two, we make some progress by giving a hungry guy who loves naps some money, and getting a job that's almost as cool as being a forklift driver. We punch a tree in episode three. In episode four we break a rock with our hand because a homeless porcupine asked us to. In episode five we follow a lady to her apartment in the middle of the day and sleep on her couch. In episode 6 we look for a book. Spoiler alert: we don't find it.

Test Chamber – Dishonored 2's Murder Sandbox

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Dishonored 2's Murder Sandbox

There are many ways to skin an assassination target, as showcased by Dishonored 2's play-it-how-you-want approach.

Dishonored 2 stars an older, more experienced Corvo Attano and a grown-up Emily Kaldwin as they use lethal force or ghostly stealth to reclaim their empire. In this episode of Test Chamber, Ben and I jump into Emily's shoes to track down and eliminate the mysterious Crown Killer. Everything in this Test Chamber was deliberately calculated, including the many alerts, deaths, and kills.

For Game Informer's final verdict on Dishonored 2, check out our review here.

Test Chamber – Dishonored 2's Murder Sandbox

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Dishonored 2's Murder Sandbox

There are many ways to skin an assassination target, as showcased by Dishonored 2's play-it-how-you-want approach.

Dishonored 2 stars an older, more experienced Corvo Attano and a grown-up Emily Kaldwin as they use lethal force or ghostly stealth to reclaim their empire. In this episode of Test Chamber, Ben and I jump into Emily's shoes to track down and eliminate the mysterious Crown Killer. Everything in this Test Chamber was deliberately calculated, including the many alerts, deaths, and kills.

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The Sports Desk – 3 Issues For Ubisoft's Steep

about X hours ago from
The Sports Desk – 3 Issues For Ubisoft's Steep

Ubisoft has just concluded its free Steep open beta, where the game's philosophy of mountainous exploration via different methods (wingsuit, skis, parachute, and snowboard) is on full display. The game is due out on December 2 (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC), and based on my experience with the beta, I still have a few things I'd like to see cleared up before it comes out.

Getting AroundWith a large expanse of mountains available (there are seven mountains with over 100 challenges listed in the beta), there is no shortage of things to do in the game. Accessing all this content isn't difficult via a map you can zoom in/out of; there are start points for runs that populate the map as you unlock them. But the one thing I haven't seen in the beta is the ability to drop in anywhere on the map.

While you're free to ski/board/fly around the environment without stopping, and replay challenges by returning to the world map, the sense of exploration is dampened by the fact that you can only transport to designated drop zones or challenge points. These open up as you level up and explore the environment – as do different mountains, so it's restrictive to see an area on the map with a steep cliff or plenty of trickable objects, for instance, and not be able to go there.

The Sports Desk – Three Issues For Ubisoft's Steep

about X hours ago from
The Sports Desk – Three Issues For Ubisoft's Steep

Ubisoft has just concluded its free Steep open beta, where the game's philosophy of mountainous exploration via different methods (wingsuit, skis, parachute, and snowboard) is on full display. The game is due out on December 2 (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC), and based on my experience with the beta, I still have a few things I'd like to see cleared up before it comes out.

Getting AroundWith a large expanse of mountains available (there are seven mountains with over 100 challenges listed in the beta), there is no shortage of things to do in the game. Accessing all this content isn't difficult via a map you can zoom in/out of; there are start points for runs that populate the map as you unlock them. But the one thing I haven't seen in the beta is the ability to drop in anywhere on the map.

While you're free to ski/board/fly around the environment without stopping, and replay challenges by returning to the world map, the sense of exploration is dampened by the fact that you can only transport to designated drop zones or challenge points. These open up as you level up and explore the environment – as do different mountains, so it's restrictive to see an area on the map with a steep cliff or plenty of trickable objects, for instance, and not be able to go there.

Replay – Dragon Ball Z: Sagas

about X hours ago from
Replay – Dragon Ball Z: Sagas

When it comes to video games adaptations, Dragon Ball Z has found a pretty comfortable spot in the fighting genre. In 2005, however, it gave the action-adventure genre a shot.

Dragon Ball Z: Sagas follows the familiar Dragon Ball Z storyline, but blows out the fights to feature more combatants and larger levels. When Sagas released, our own Joe Juba gave it a huge thumb down with a score of 5 out of 10. Sagas is not widely loved, but is one of the few Dragon Ball Z console games that is not a straightforward fighter.

Andrew Reiner, Joe Juba, self-proclaimed "D-Head" Jeff Cork, and I take a look at Sagas, show you how to almost get a lot of Xbox 360 Achievements with little effort, and dive into a comparable Dragon Ball Z game on Game Boy Advance. We should probably play more Dragon Ball games in the future (Jeff Cork is such a huge fan, after all) so let us know which ones we need to check out in the comments section below!

Replay – Dragon Ball Z: Sagas

about X hours ago from

When it comes to video games adaptations, Dragon Ball Z has found a pretty comfortable spot in the fighting genre. In 2005, however, it gave the action-adventure genre a shot.

Dragon Ball Z: Sagas follows the familiar Dragon Ball Z storyline, but blows out the fights to feature more combatants and larger levels. When Sagas released, our own Joe Juba gave it a huge thumb down with a score of 5 out of 10. Sagas is not widely loved, but is one of the few Dragon Ball Z console games that is not a straightforward fighter.

Andrew Reiner, Joe Juba, self-proclaimed "D-Head" Jeff Cork, and I take a look at Sagas, show you how to almost get a lot of Xbox 360 Achievements with little effort, and dive into a comparable Dragon Ball Z game on Game Boy Advance. We should probably play more Dragon Ball games in the future (Jeff Cork is such a huge fan, after all) so let us know which ones we need to check out in the comments section below!

Join Our Game Club For Pokémon Sun And Moon

about X hours ago from
Join Our Game Club For Pokémon Sun And Moon

This year on Game Informer's weekly podcast, we debuted a new feature called GI Game Club where we play through specific games and talk about them in exquisite detail alongside our wonderful community. Next up we're talking about Game Freak's Pokémon Sun and Moon. The game is released on the Nintendo 3DS on November 18th, the first chapter of the two-part Game Club will air on The Game Informer Show on December 1st.

If you'd like to join in on the fun, please play the game and stop after you finish the fourth trial on the second island. Then send your poignant thoughts to podcast@gameinformer.com. We're looking forward to reading your emails on the podcast, so send in your thoughts on the game's story, new Pokémon to catch, Alola region, and the gameplay changes from previous installments. Whatever you'd like! The strange/funny/small notes are always welcome!

Feel free to subscribe to The GI Show on iTunes or Google Play, and if you're curious about what we've covered in the past, you can click through to watch our discussions for Final Fantasy VIIUncharted 4: A Thief's End, Deus Ex: Human Revolution, and the original BioShock.

Top Of The Table – Junk Art

about X hours ago from
Top Of The Table – Junk Art

After a side trek into the world of horror with Mansions of Madness and a collection of Halloween-appropriate games, this week I’m here to recommend a brilliant new game about creativity, engineering know-how, and a steady hand. Junk Art is colorful and simple to pick up for experienced tabletop gamers who want a break from more in-depth strategy games, but it’s also an ideal family game, or even a fun option for a night in with your partner. 

Junk Art keeps its thematic concept very straightforward. You’re an aspiring artist on a world tour, building up crazy constructions of odd shapes and color, all with the goal of amassing fans and delighting those who visit your installations. Your chosen medium is junk – flower pots, balls, pipes, and platforms – and every piece must fit meticulously with its fellows to create a towering testament to your genius.

The game’s big visual lure is its varied, multi-colored pieces. These vibrant wooden pieces seem ill-suited for construction, but the more you play, the more you find intriguing ways for the different pieces to fit together. The pieces are smartly crafted, smoothly tooled, and excellently balanced, so it comes down to your own choice of placement and light touch to ensure that your tower grows on each turn. 

Top Of The Table – Junk Art

about X hours ago from

After a side trek into the world of horror with Mansions of Madness and a collection of Halloween-appropriate games, this week I’m here to recommend a brilliant new game about creativity, engineering know-how, and a steady hand. Junk Art is colorful and simple to pick up for experienced tabletop gamers who want a break from more in-depth strategy games, but it’s also an ideal family game, or even a fun option for a night in with your partner. 

Junk Art keeps its thematic concept very straightforward. You’re an aspiring artist on a world tour, building up crazy constructions of odd shapes and color, all with the goal of amassing fans and delighting those who visit your installations. Your chosen medium is junk – flower pots, balls, pipes, and platforms – and every piece must fit meticulously with its fellows to create a towering testament to your genius.

The game’s big visual lure is its varied, multi-colored pieces. These vibrant wooden pieces seem ill-suited for construction, but the more you play, the more you find intriguing ways for the different pieces to fit together. The pieces are smartly crafted, smoothly tooled, and excellently balanced, so it comes down to your own choice of placement and light touch to ensure that your tower grows on each turn.