Here Are The Most Peculiar Ways To Kill In Hitman 2

about X hours ago from
Here Are The Most Peculiar Ways To Kill In Hitman 2

Spoiler warning: Major spoilers for Hitman 2 assassinations.

The latest release of Hitman really shows off IO Interactive's ability to make a creative murder playground, with Agent 57 pulling no punches in finding peculiar but effective ways to take down his targets.

Even using an unassuming item like a suitcase (that thanks to a bug acts like a homing missile) can pacify those in your way, and a toilet is the perfect deathtrap after making someone sick with poison. With tools like these, you can be an expert executioner without anyone knowing.

Here Are The Most Peculiar Ways To Kill In Hitman 2

about X hours ago from
Here Are The Most Peculiar Ways To Kill In Hitman 2

Spoiler warning: Major spoilers for Hitman 2 assassinations.

The latest release of Hitman really shows off IO Interactive's ability to make a creative murder playground, with Agent 57 pulling no punches in finding peculiar but effective ways to take down his targets.

Even using an unassuming item like a suitcase (that thanks to a bug acts like a homing missile) can pacify those in your way, and a toilet is the perfect deathtrap after making someone sick with poison. With tools like these, you can be an expert executioner without anyone knowing.

Developer Top 5 Games Of 2018

about X hours ago from
Developer Top 5 Games Of 2018

2018 was a fantastic year for games and I don't think it's a controversial statement to say that that's entirely thanks to the people who make video games. Games don't suddenly appear from thin air, after all. To commemorate the video game year of 2018, we decided to reach out to those folks, the ones who make video games, and find out what sort of games they liked in 2018, specifically their five favorites, but the rules are fast and loose. A few snuck in bonus sixth entries and others wrote exactly why they picked the games they did, which we were happy to accept and share.

Check out the lists below to learn what the makers of games like God of War, Darksiders, Destiny, Resident Evil, Monster Hunter, and plenty more were into this year.

David Adams is game director for Darksiders III at Gunfire Games.

Developer Top 5 Games Of 2018

about X hours ago from
Developer Top 5 Games Of 2018

2018 was a fantastic year for games and I don't think it's a controversial statement to say that that's entirely thanks to the people who make video games. Games don't suddenly appear from thin air, after all. To commemorate the video game year of 2018, we decided to reach out to those folks, the ones who make video games, and find out what sort of games they liked in 2018, specifically their five favorites, but the rules are fast and loose. A few snuck in bonus sixth entries and others wrote exactly why they picked the games they did, which we were happy to accept and share.

Check out the lists below to learn what the makers of games like God of War, Darksiders, Destiny, Resident Evil, Monster Hunter, and plenty more were into this year.

David Adams is game director for Darksiders III at Gunfire Games.

Game Workers Unite: The Fight To Unionize The Video Game Industry

about X hours ago from
Game Workers Unite: The Fight To Unionize The Video Game Industry

In 2018, at expos across the world – from San Francisco to Melbourne, Montreal to Seattle, London to Tokyo – the first overt signs of an organized game developer pushback emerged from the shadows.

You could see it in the protest badges strewn across indie game booths at PAX. Developers handing out pamphlets in crowded hallways at GDC. Stickers with slogans like "Press X to form union" and "Fight bosses not devs" scattered across convention centers the world over. It's small but growing, tentative but tangible, a whisper bursting to scream.

At the heart of it all stands Game Workers Unite (GWU), a collective of largely anonymous activists that coordinate on platforms like Discord and Facebook. Comprised of both indie and triple-A developers, the GWU operates under a horizontal, democratic structure – everyone I speak to is reluctant to claim the mantle of "leader."

Game Workers Unite: The Fight To Unionize The Video Game Industry

about X hours ago from
Game Workers Unite: The Fight To Unionize The Video Game Industry

In 2018, at expos across the world – from San Francisco to Melbourne, Montreal to Seattle, London to Tokyo – the first overt signs of an organized game developer pushback emerged from the shadows.

You could see it in the protest badges strewn across indie game booths at PAX. Developers handing out pamphlets in crowded hallways at GDC. Stickers with slogans like "Press X to form union" and "Fight bosses not devs" scattered across convention centers the world over. It's small but growing, tentative but tangible, a whisper bursting to scream.

At the heart of it all stands Game Workers Unite (GWU), a collective of largely anonymous activists that coordinate on platforms like Discord and Facebook. Comprised of both indie and triple-A developers, the GWU operates under a horizontal, democratic structure – everyone I speak to is reluctant to claim the mantle of "leader."

How Rage 2 Rewards Those Who Have Played The First Game

about X hours ago from
How Rage 2 Rewards Those Who Have Played The First Game

As we revealed earlier this month, you don't need to play the original Rage to understand Rage 2's story. However, there are definitely some surprises and nice nods to the original game for returning players. “One of the great things about the Rage universe is that it’s very open, very flexible," says Tim Willits, Id Software's studio director. "So the opportunities for expansions and content and new games and different characters is rich because we’re not boxed into a world that has any rules. We really purposely set out to create a world that’s open enough and flexible enough to have a continued experience.”
The flexible nature of the franchise means a lot of things. First and foremost, tossing the events of the Rage tie-in novel by Matthew Costello, by the wayside. However, it also means that while Rage 2 tells a standalone story, it's populated by characters returning from the original game. Loosum Hagar taught the first game's protagonist Nicholas Raine how to use the series' trademark wing stick. She returns as the leader of one of the factions in Rage 2. As the gunslinging mayor of Wellspring, she's older, wiser, and a bit more vicious than the last time we saw her. Captain Marshall, the leader of the resistance from the first game, also returns as a bar owner taking up arms against the Authority in a war that never seems to end.

How Rage 2 Rewards Those Who Have Played The First Game

about X hours ago from
How Rage 2 Rewards Those Who Have Played The First Game

As we revealed earlier this month, you don't need to play the original Rage to understand Rage 2's story. However, there are definitely some surprises and nice nods to the original game for returning players. “One of the great things about the Rage universe is that it’s very open, very flexible," says Tim Willits, Id Software's studio director. "So the opportunities for expansions and content and new games and different characters is rich because we’re not boxed into a world that has any rules. We really purposely set out to create a world that’s open enough and flexible enough to have a continued experience.” The flexible nature of the franchise means a lot of things. First and foremost, tossing the events of the Rage tie-in novel by Matthew Costello, by the wayside. However, it also means that while Rage 2 tells a standalone story, it's populated by characters returning from the original game. Loosum Hagar taught the first game's protagonist Nicholas Raine how to use the series' trademark wing stick. She returns as the leader of one of the factions in Rage 2. As the gunslinging mayor of Wellspring, she's older, wiser, and a bit more vicious than the last time we saw her. Captain Marshall, the leader of the resistance from the first game, also returns as a bar owner taking up arms against the Authority in a war that never seems to end.

Spider-Man: Silver Lining Impressions – A Fitting, But Breezy End

about X hours ago from
Spider-Man: Silver Lining Impressions – A Fitting, But Breezy End

Both Peter Parker and Insomniac Games know the end is near in Silver Lining, the final installment in The City That Never Sleeps DLC campaign. They race to the finish, almost like this story is ticking down like a timer on a bomb. Mary Jane Watson drops big news on Peter, but neither of them find the time to discuss it. All of the big story moments happen on the phone, while Spider-Man races to his next destination.

The flighty pace accompanies the action, which is even more bombastic and challenging than the core game, thanks to new aerial units that can fabricate large stasis fields to limit Spider-Man's web swinging. All of Hammerhead's forces are decked out in Project Olympus gear, and their numbers are great, especially in the optional hideout encounters, which are brutally difficult and a hell of a workout for Spider-Man. Get used to switching between gadgets in these fights. You'll likely need to use most of them.

This final chapter focuses mostly on combat in the story missions, but does slow things down for a brief second to give players a glimpse at Hammerhead's underground lair, another new location that is used effectively for storytelling reasons. One of my favorite moments across the entire game occurs in this location, and is the key moment in Silver Sable and Spider-Man coming to terms with each other's unorthodox styles of crime fighting.

Spider-Man: Silver Lining Impressions – A Fitting, But Breezy End

about X hours ago from
Spider-Man: Silver Lining Impressions – A Fitting, But Breezy End

Both Peter Parker and Insomniac Games know the end is near in Silver Lining, the final installment in The City That Never Sleeps DLC campaign. They race to the finish, almost like this story is ticking down like a timer on a bomb. Mary Jane Watson drops big news on Peter, but neither of them find the time to discuss it. All of the big story moments happen on the phone, while Spider-Man races to his next destination.

The flighty pace accompanies the action, which is even more bombastic and challenging than the core game, thanks to new aerial units that can fabricate large stasis fields to limit Spider-Man's web swinging. All of Hammerhead's forces are decked out in Project Olympus gear, and their numbers are great, especially in the optional hideout encounters, which are brutally difficult and a hell of a workout for Spider-Man. Get used to switching between gadgets in these fights. You'll likely need to use most of them.

This final chapter focuses mostly on combat in the story missions, but does slow things down for a brief second to give players a glimpse at Hammerhead's underground lair, another new location that is used effectively for storytelling reasons. One of my favorite moments across the entire game occurs in this location, and is the key moment in Silver Sable and Spider-Man coming to terms with each other's unorthodox styles of crime fighting.