Vote For Your 2016 Games Of The Year

about X hours ago from
Vote For Your 2016 Games Of The Year

Now is your chance to sound off on your favorite games of 2016. Vote for your favorite games, and do your part to make sure they make our Reader Games of the Year section in our upcoming issue.

This year, the video game industry delivered some phenomenal titles. From fantastic releases that kept players coming back for more, to polished, incredible adventures that will stick with us for the rest of our gaming lives, 2016 delivered an outstanding line-up of games. With so many great games hitting this year, coming up with our list of the Top 50 Games of 2016 was tougher than any year in recent memory, and no game is guaranteed any award, so be sure to vote to ensure that your favorite releases are represented in our results!

You may notice that some obvious picks aren't on the list. That could be because of our eligibility requirements. We only include final games, which means that Steam early access titles and beta games aren't eligible. In addition, remasters are restricted to that category. If a game is episodic, but the final episode hasn't released in 2016, that also keeps it off our list for this year.

RPG Grind Time – Cherishing Final Fantasy XV's Road Trip

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RPG Grind Time – Cherishing Final Fantasy XV's Road Trip

Road trips are what you make of them, and in Final Fantasy XV I’ve been making the most of mine. After waiting through a decade of highs and lows for this game, I’m not rushing through the experience. Instead, I’m taking my time, soaking up the scenery, going wherever the road takes me. Sometimes that’s a string of side quests, other times it’s just standing in awe of the beautiful sights and massive creatures. What this game gets right is that it’s all about the journey and being in the moment. Therefore, I haven’t minded making detours even when it’s for the silliest, most inconsequential stuff, such as tracking down wild chocobos for a photo. The message of friendship and making memories out of the most mundane moments is really resonating with me, especially when the darkest times seem just around the corner. I won’t soon forget some of the random car chatter I’ve had with the gang, nor will I forget the more poignant moments when the guys open up about their hardships (poor Prompto!). 

Why Prey's Aliens Are Different Than Anything You've Encountered

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Why Prey's Aliens Are Different Than Anything You've Encountered

In the late 1950s, man first began to reach for the stars. Unfortunately in Prey’s alternate history, the first thing we grabbed hold of was an alien menace called the Typhon. This one small, shadow-like creature proved so hostile to humanity’s existence that our world’s greatest minds locked the creature away inside an orbital space station. Flash forward nearly 70 years, and that small orbital “prison” has grown into a monolithic research facility owned by the mega-corporation TranStar – and that single Typhon has evolved into an entire race of monstrous creatures that could haunt a generation of nightmares. Join us as we take a deeper look into the abilities and behaviors of Prey’s devious new enemies.

Opinion – Watch Dogs 2 Would Be Better Without Guns

about X hours ago from
Opinion – Watch Dogs 2 Would Be Better Without Guns

Spoiler Warning: Some minor plot details are mentioned for Watch Dogs 2.

With a more jubilant protagonist, Watch Dogs 2 leaves behind the somber tone of the last game for a more vibrant and lighthearted experience. The 20-something hacker Marcus, who has a fondness for action films, video games, and crude humor, is a friendly jokester who spends much of his time making pop-culture references. While harmless outside of being able to create digital havoc, Watch Dogs 2 wants us to believe that he can also be a ruthless killer – and it just doesn’t fit.

Although the narrative introduces fascinating themes about technology, it’s negated by the existence of guns, creating a narrative dissonance that’s impossible to ignore. Marcus, who was unjustly profiled as a criminal by the mass-surveillance system, ctOS, wants to expose corporations and governments that abuse their power through technology. Gun-toting is inconsistent with his lighthearted and activist personality, making it difficult to get behind his cause when he’s printing guns out of a 3D printer and using hacks for his own personal gain.

Science-Fiction Weekly – Dreadnought, Prey, Transformers: The Last Knight

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Science-Fiction Weekly – Dreadnought, Prey, Transformers: The Last Knight

I attended PlayStation Experience this past weekend, and had the opportunity to play a 5v5 match of Dreadnought running on PlayStation 4. Dreadnought was announced way back in 2014 as a PC exclusive, but like a starship firing up its engines for liftoff, it took a considerable amount of time to come together, and didn't hit beta status until April of this year. The official release date for both the PC and PlayStation 4 versions remains a murky "2017," but after just one match, I can confidently say you want to put this one on your radar. Dreadnought is doing something different in the multiplayer space, and could be a nice palate cleanser next year.

When I was waiting for my match to begin, a sense of dread washed over me, as I watched another group of players battle it out. From afar, the game looked incredibly boring. The starships were barely moving, and I couldn't decipher many strategies being deployed other than firing swarms of missiles. It looked like a game picking away at health meters and hoping your salvo hit truer than your enemies'.

Oculus Touch Review

about X hours ago from
Oculus Touch Review

The Oculus Rift launched last March, but unlike the HTC Vive or PSVR, it lacked motion controllers out the gate. Instead, players have interacted with games by using an Xbox One controller. With the recently released Touch controllers, Oculus puts its VR platform on par with the competition. So do these controllers fundamentally change the Rift experience? Sort of.

What You Get:The box includes two Oculus Touch controllers, one for each of your hands, a corresponding sensor you need to use them, and a VR connector used specifically for Rock Band. No games are included with the controllers right now, but Robo Recall (a Time Crisis-like shooting gallery) will be made free to Oculus Touch owners when it releases next year. You can also download a demo for Robo Recall to help tide you over until the full game arrives. This all comes at the relatively steep price of $200, which brings the cost of the whole Oculus Rift package up to $800 – not counting the PC you need to run it.

Test Chamber – The Crazy Antics And Bloody Deaths Of Let It Die

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Test Chamber – The Crazy Antics And Bloody Deaths Of Let It Die

You might have missed the memo that Let It Die, a free-to-play action game created by Grasshopper Manufacture and Gung Ho Entertainment, is now available on PlayStation 4. The game, which oozes Grasshopper's signature zany style, has you making your way up a deadly tower, trying to survive by finding new weapons and armor. During your trek, you'll fight other players and special bosses to discover the tower's larger mysteries. 

In this episode of Test Chamber, join Javy Gwaltney and I as we begin the game and see what Let It Die has to offer. From swinging hockey sticks and doing yoga to meeting Uncle Death and splattering a lot of blood, we discover this isn't an ordinary journey about survival. It's one insane trip that you must see for yourself in the video below. 

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Ask BioWare Questions About Mass Effect Andromeda For Our Podcast

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Ask BioWare Questions About Mass Effect Andromeda For Our Podcast

During our month of Mass Effect Andromeda coverage, we've already gotten 101 answers from the team (and even done an AMA ourselves), but we know that Mass Effect fans always have more questions. Well, here's your chance to ask them!

On an upcoming episode of the GI Show, we're going to sit down with BioWare and ask questions submitted by you, the community.  So leave a comment below to ask anything you want to know about Mass Effect Andromeda.  Gameplay, characters, story, multiplayer – let us know what you're curious about, and we'll do our best to get answers.

Ask us your best question in the comments below and subscribe to Game Informer's podcast to get ready for the upcoming episode!

Six Things The Last Guardian Borrows From It Predecessors

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Six Things The Last Guardian Borrows From It Predecessors

The Last Guardian is an intriguing game by itself, focusing on the unique bond between a boy and a large beast called Trico. However, the game doesn’t exist in isolation. Players aren’t required to be familiar with the previous works from creator Fumito Ueda (Ico, Shadow of the Colossus) in order to appreciate the The Last Guardian, but having that background makes it easy to see a clear evolutionary path.

By taking elements from the two prior titles, the team behind The Last Guardian built a new experience based on the foundation of familiar lessons and strategies. These are some of the major pillars from the past that prop up the latest adventure.

1. Trico (Shadow of the Colossus) The star of The Last Guardian hasn’t appeared in previous titles, but gameplay revolving around hulking behemoths was the core concept behind Shadow of the Colossus. You can see the influence of the earlier work in how easily Trico moves through the environment and interacts with objects; the team clearly leveraged its experience when it came to making a larger-than-life creature inhabit the world. Echoes of the various colossi are apparent in many of Trico’s actions, from the way it attacks enemies to its long leaps to precarious perches.