Replay – Dante’s Inferno

about X hours ago from

Most gamers know Visceral Games as the developer behind the necromorph nightmare-inducing Dead Space series, but in 2010 the studio went straight to hell. Dante’s Inferno provided gamers with a controversial take on Dante’s Divine Comedy – not just because of some of the mature content in the game (avert your eyes, underage viewers!), but also because of how closely it mirrored God of War’s gameplay. In this week’s episode of Replay, the Game Informer crew takes a surprisingly boob-filled tour through hell, while reflecting on what they remember (and more often don’t) about Dante’s Inferno.

Be sure to stick around for a quick look at our second game, which sports a remarkably different tone. What is it, you ask? All we’ll say is this is one wicked cricket don’t want to miss.

Replay – Dante’s Inferno

about X hours ago from

Most gamers know Visceral Games as the developer behind the necromorph nightmare-inducing Dead Space series, but in 2010 the studio went straight to hell. Dante’s Inferno provided gamers with a controversial take on Dante’s Divine Comedy – not just because of some of the mature content in the game (avert your eyes, underage viewers!), but also because of how closely it mirrored God of War’s gameplay. In this week’s episode of Replay, the Game Informer crew takes a surprisingly boob-filled tour through hell, while reflecting on what they remember (and more often don’t) about Dante’s Inferno.

Be sure to stick around for a quick look at our second game, which sports a remarkably different tone. What is it, you ask? All we’ll say is this is one wicked cricket don’t want to miss.

Three Things Pokémon Go Can Learn From Jurassic World Alive – And Vice Versa

about X hours ago from
Three Things Pokémon Go Can Learn From Jurassic World Alive – And Vice Versa

Jurassic World Alive has only be available for just over a week, and developer Ludia is already providing significant updates that enhance the game and how we interact with it. With each update I found myself saying "That's a cool idea. Pokémon Go should steal it." Both Jurassic World Alive and Pokémon Go still feel half-baked when it comes to the content offered or how far it is stretched. This is more forgiving for a game that is just a week old, but it could also speak to just how challenging it is to create games of this caliber.

Ludia and Niantic (which makes Pokémon Go) are racing into unknown territory with their respective games, but they can both learn from each other.  Having another developer enter the real-world monster-collecting space is a good thing. Competition should lead to the developers trying to outperform each other.

Niantic just started iterating at a faster rate in the last year. Ludia appears to have plenty of content to share right out of the gate. This reminds me a little of Fortnite entering the market and releasing a ton of content as PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds stuck to the formula and had to adapt just to keep pace.

A Brief History Of Unused Pokémon Designs

about X hours ago from
A Brief History Of Unused Pokémon Designs

A demo version of Pokémon Gold And Silver originally playable at the Nintendo Space World trade show in 1997 recently surfaced online, bringing with it dozens of unused Pokémon designs. We’re taking a look at some of the other official designs that never made it into the series.

Before Pokémon was Pokémon, it was “Capsule Monsters.” Inspired by gashapon machines, bug collecting, and the possibility of a player-to-player trading system via the Game Boy’s link cable, Satoshi Tajiri created a manga titled Capsule Monsters as a way to pitch the game’s concept to Nintendo in the early 1990s.

The manga contained several early designs for Pokémon like Lapras and Rhydon (who is probably the first Pokémon ever designed), as well as completely original designs, like a little dinosaur creature hatching from an egg and a thing that looks like Charizard with no legs and tiny wings. You can see these and other old designs, including a cute gorilla with a hat apparently known as "Gorrilaimo," in the tweet thread below.

A Brief History Of Unused Pokémon Designs

about X hours ago from
A Brief History Of Unused Pokémon Designs

A demo version of Pokémon Gold And Silver originally playable at the Nintendo Space World trade show in 1997 recently surfaced online, bringing with it dozens of unused Pokémon designs. We’re taking a look at some of the other official designs that never made it into the series.

Before Pokémon was Pokémon, it was “Capsule Monsters.” Inspired by gashapon machines, bug collecting, and the possibility of a player-to-player trading system via the Game Boy’s link cable, Satoshi Tajiri created a manga titled Capsule Monsters as a way to pitch the game’s concept to Nintendo in the early 1990s.

The manga contained several early designs for Pokémon like Lapras and Rhydon (who is probably the first Pokémon ever designed), as well as completely original designs, like a little dinosaur creature hatching from an egg and a thing that looks like Charizard with no legs and tiny wings. You can see these and other old designs, including a cute gorilla with a hat apparently known as "Gorrilaimo," in the tweet thread below.

Hallelujah, We Have A New Website!

about X hours ago from
Hallelujah, We Have A New Website!

If you’re reading this now, you’re probably aware that Game Informer got a fancy new redesign a couple of days ago (or else you’re terribly confused right now). The update was a long time in the making, and isn’t just a skin-deep improvement – the entire site has been recreated from the ground up to provide a faster, more flexible, and all-around better viewing experience to our readers. That’s hopefully already evident to you – but to truly appreciate the changes, we should take a pleasant stroll grueling death march down memory lane to see just how far we’ve come.

I started working at G.I. in 2009, shortly before the launch of the old website. Back then, the old-old site was a completely different beast, and largely separate from the magazine. Creating stories was a time-consuming, multi-step affair. Here’s an excerpt of the posting instructions that I received as a budding intern:

Hallelujah, We Have A New Website!

about X hours ago from
Hallelujah, We Have A New Website!

If you’re reading this now, you’re probably aware that Game Informer got a fancy new redesign a couple of days ago (or else you’re terribly confused right now). The update was a long time in the making, and isn’t just a skin-deep improvement – the entire site has been recreated from the ground up to provide a faster, more flexible, and all-around better viewing experience to our readers. That’s hopefully already evident to you – but to truly appreciate the changes, we should take a pleasant stroll grueling death march down memory lane to see just how far we’ve come.

I started working at G.I. in 2009, shortly before the launch of the old website. Back then, the old-old site was a completely different beast, and largely separate from the magazine. Creating stories was a time-consuming, multi-step affair. Here’s an excerpt of the posting instructions that I received as a budding intern:

E3 Bingo: 2018 Edition

about X hours ago from
E3 Bingo: 2018 Edition

E3 is upon us, and the show is always full of surprises. For those who enjoy following the big developments from home, we've compiled the potential announcements and mishaps of E3 onto a single Bingo card, because Bingo is the ultimate game.

For our desktop users (sorry, mobile folks), an interactive version of the card is also available:

Play E3 Bingo here!

We'll Be Streaming The GI Show From E3, See Our Our Nightly Schedule Here

about X hours ago from

The gaming industry is always moving faster and faster and that pace kicks up tenfold during the week of E3. Luckily, Game Informer has your back! Between analyses of the various press conferences to the fastest coverage of major games we're seeing at the show, the GI Show will be streaming every night of E3, with our editors in Los Angeles coming together to talk about the hottest games in the city.

Not only that, but on several nights, we're bringing in developers to talk with us about their games and their thoughts on a lot more.

We wanted to go ahead and give you our stream schedule now so you can make sure you know when to tune in next week and enjoy the show.

We'll Be Streaming The GI Show From E3, See Our Nightly Schedule Here

about X hours ago from

The gaming industry is always moving faster and faster and that pace kicks up tenfold during the week of E3. Luckily, Game Informer has your back! Between analyses of the various press conferences to the fastest coverage of major games we're seeing at the show, the GI Show will be streaming every night of E3, with our editors in Los Angeles coming together to talk about the hottest games in the city.

Not only that, but on several nights, we're bringing in developers to talk with us about their games and their thoughts on a lot more.

We wanted to go ahead and give you our stream schedule now so you can make sure you know when to tune in next week and enjoy the show.