Game Informer’s Best Of 2018 Awards

about X hours ago from
Game Informer’s Best Of 2018 Awards

Every year the video game industry somehow seems to up the ante on the breadth and quality of experiences it provides to players, and 2018 was no exception. Fans of triple-A blockbusters were consumed with the massive open worlds of games like Red Dead Redemption II, Assassin’s Creed Odyssey, and Spider-Man. Multiplayer fans shot, slashed, and punched their way through the competition in Black Ops 4, Monster Hunter: World, and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. And perhaps most importantly, titles like Fortnite, Overwatch, Destiny 2, and many others continued to blur the line between old and new by offering a steady stream of game-changing updates and seasonal content to keep gamers playing well after launch.

While the latest issue of Game Informer contains the full rundown of our 50 favorite games of 2018 (plus a ton of Top 10 lists highlighting the best characters, moments, dorks, etc.), we’ve also got a host of year-end awards to share, which you can check out right here. From the best platform exclusives to genre leaders to the illustrious Game of the Year award, here is the best of the best that 2018 had to offer.

Check out all the award winners below, and then see how they stacked up to the results of the Reader’s Choice Awards.

Science-Fiction Weekly – Star Wars Resistance, Watchmen

about X hours ago from
Science-Fiction Weekly – Star Wars Resistance, Watchmen

As I watched the first 10 episodes of Star Wars Resistance, Lucasfilm’s latest animated series, I was periodically reminded of Skies of Arcadia, a great Dreamcast RPG from yesteryear that had a vibe of its own, but sadly didn’t get the attention it deserved. There isn’t a clear through line between the game and show, but their characters, set up, and charm sit in the same murky territory of pirates being handled in a slightly different way than we’re accustomed to.

Star Wars Resistance follows a misfit named Kazuda Xiono, who becomes a part of the Resistance and is tasked to identity First Order spies on an ocean-based aircraft refueling platform named Colossus. The platform functions like a small tourist town with pilots stopping by for short periods of time as their ships are refueled or repaired. The platform is also visited frequently by air pirates, who swoop in, attack, and try to make off with whatever valuables they can.

Skies of Arcadia follows a misfit named Vyse, who is a part of the Blue Rogue air pirates, a group that resists the movements of the Valuan Empire, attacks them, and, well, tries to make off with whatever of its valuables it can.

Science-Fiction Weekly – Star Wars Resistance, Watchmen

about X hours ago from
Science-Fiction Weekly – Star Wars Resistance, Watchmen

As I watched the first 10 episodes of Star Wars Resistance, Lucasfilm’s latest animated series, I was periodically reminded of Skies of Arcadia, a great Dreamcast RPG from yesteryear that had a vibe of its own, but sadly didn’t get the attention it deserved. There isn’t a clear through line between the game and show, but their characters, set up, and charm sit in the same murky territory of pirates being handled in a slightly different way than we’re accustomed to.

Star Wars Resistance follows a misfit named Kazuda Xiono, who becomes a part of the Resistance and is tasked to identity First Order spies on an ocean-based aircraft refueling platform named Colossus. The platform functions like a small tourist town with pilots stopping by for short periods of time as their ships are refueled or repaired. The platform is also visited frequently by air pirates, who swoop in, attack, and try to make off with whatever valuables they can.

Skies of Arcadia follows a misfit named Vyse, who is a part of the Blue Rogue air pirates, a group that resists the movements of the Valuan Empire, attacks them, and, well, tries to make off with whatever of its valuables it can.

Science-Fiction Weekly – Star Wars Resistance, Watchmen

about X hours ago from
Science-Fiction Weekly – Star Wars Resistance, Watchmen

As I watched the first 10 episodes of Star Wars Resistance, Lucasfilm’s latest animated series, I was periodically reminded of Skies of Arcadia, a great Dreamcast RPG from yesteryear that had a vibe of its own, but sadly didn’t get the attention it deserved. There isn’t a clear through line between the game and show, but their characters, set up, and charm sit in the same murky territory of pirates being handled in a slightly different way than we’re accustomed to.

Star Wars Resistance follows a misfit named Kazuda Xiono, who becomes a part of the Resistance and is tasked to identity First Order spies on an ocean-based aircraft refueling platform named Colossus. The platform functions like a small tourist town with pilots stopping by for short periods of time as their ships are refueled or repaired. The platform is also visited frequently by air pirates, who swoop in, attack, and try to make off with whatever valuables they can.

Skies of Arcadia follows a misfit named Vyse, who is a part of the Blue Rogue air pirates, a group that resists the movements of the Valuan Empire, attacks them, and, well, tries to make off with whatever of its valuables it can.

Why Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Doesn't Have Online Multiplayer

about X hours ago from
Why Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Doesn't Have Online Multiplayer

After the initial reveal of Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, we quickly learned it would lack online multiplayer – a first for the developer’s major titles since Demon’s Souls. As part of our visit to the studio for our cover story, we asked them to elaborate on why that was the case.

Past From games have had an idiosyncratic take on online multiplayer. Players could leave each other notes throughout the world, warning each other of dangerous surprises or goading them into hazards. One player could summon another to help them with a difficult section, but risk being invaded and attacked by another.

From Software isn’t necessarily abandoning that part of its legacy, but it is taking a bit of a detour for now. “Of course, we at From, we love those online elements,” says Yasuhiro Kitao, manager of marketing and communications at From. “We love to create our own characters just as much as everyone else. We hope players are looking forward to something in the future where we might go back to that, but for now, Sekiro is very much its own thing.”

Why Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Doesn't Have Online Multiplayer

about X hours ago from
Why Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Doesn't Have Online Multiplayer

After the initial reveal of Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, we quickly learned it would lack online multiplayer – a first for the developer’s major titles since Demon’s Souls. As part of our visit to the studio for our cover story, we asked them to elaborate on why that was the case.

Past From games have had an idiosyncratic take on online multiplayer. Players could leave each other notes throughout the world, warning each other of dangerous surprises or goading them into hazards. One player could summon another to help them with a difficult section, but risk being invaded and attacked by another.

From Software isn’t necessarily abandoning that part of its legacy, but it is taking a bit of a detour for now. “Of course, we at From, we love those online elements,” says Yasuhiro Kitao, manager of marketing and communications at From. “We love to create our own characters just as much as everyone else. We hope players are looking forward to something in the future where we might go back to that, but for now, Sekiro is very much its own thing.”

How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

about X hours ago from
How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

One of the ways Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice marks a departure for From Software is in how your character becomes stronger. In other From games, you tailor your character by pouring points into different stats like strength, dexterity, and intelligence, depending on whether you want to fight as a brute, archer, or wizard, respectively. Shadows Die Twice won’t have that breadth of customization, as your character, The Wolf, is a shinobi through and through. That doesn’t mean you can’t tailor him to fit your playstyle, though.

A major departure hardcore From fans may scoff at is the lack of corpse runs. Though you gain experience from defeating foes in Shadows Die Twice, that experience is now divorced from currency; gold now drops from enemies as well, and you won’t lose either when you die. If you’re afraid that change might upset the balance of tension and accomplishment that have come define From games, there’s hope: Director Hidetaka Miyazaki says death will have a detrimental effect, but wasn’t willing to tell us what that might be.

How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

about X hours ago from
How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

One of the ways Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice marks a departure for From Software is in how your character becomes stronger. In other From games, you tailor your character by pouring points into different stats like strength, dexterity, and intelligence, depending on whether you want to fight as a brute, archer, or wizard, respectively. Shadows Die Twice won’t have that breadth of customization, as your character, The Wolf, is a shinobi through and through. That doesn’t mean you can’t tailor him to fit your playstyle, though.

A major departure hardcore From fans may scoff at is the lack of corpse runs. Though you gain experience from defeating foes in Shadows Die Twice, that experience is now divorced from currency; gold now drops from enemies as well, and you won’t lose either when you die. If you’re afraid that change might upset the balance of tension and accomplishment that have come define From games, there’s hope: Director Hidetaka Miyazaki says death will have a detrimental effect, but wasn’t willing to tell us what that might be.

How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

about X hours ago from
How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

One of the ways Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice marks a departure for From Software is in how your character becomes stronger. In other From games, you tailor your character by pouring points into different stats like strength, dexterity, and intelligence, depending on whether you want to fight as a brute, archer, or wizard, respectively. Shadows Die Twice won’t have that breadth of customization, as your character, The Wolf, is a shinobi through and through. That doesn’t mean you can’t tailor him to fit your playstyle, though.

A major departure hardcore From fans may scoff at is the lack of corpse runs. Though you gain experience from defeating foes in Shadows Die Twice, that experience is now divorced from currency; gold now drops from enemies as well, and you won’t lose either when you die. If you’re afraid that change might upset the balance of tension and accomplishment that have come define From games, there’s hope: Director Hidetaka Miyazaki says death will have a detrimental effect, but wasn’t willing to tell us what that might be.

February Cover Revealed - Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

about X hours ago from
February Cover Revealed - Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

From Software has been around forever, but is best known for its suite of action RPG games beginning with Demon's Souls. Between Dark Souls titles and Bloodborne, From has explored atmospheric dark fantasy and cosmic horror, and now they head to feudal Japan for Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice. We spent over two hours with the game in Tokyo and picked From Software president Hidetaka Miyazaki's mind to get all the details on the upcoming game, from progression systems to traversal. Check out the cover for the February issue of Game Informer!

Join us to discover what makes Sekiro different from From's suite of existing games as well as why fans of Souls games have a lot to look forward to. The February issue doesn't stop there, and is dedicated to the top games of 2018, including our expansive top 50 list, game of the year award, and our top picks for each category. You'll also find our choices for top dorks, characters, publishers, and more, including an interview with the director of the 1994 Double Dragon movie!