Brawlin With Supercell's Brawl Stars

about X hours ago from
Brawlin With Supercell's Brawl Stars

Supercell, the company behind Clash of Clans and Clash Royale, has a new title on the mobile stage just in time for holiday travel. It’s call Brawl Stars, and it’s a lot different than their previous titles, and draws on all new characters and style. Playing as brawlers (which have different rarities, abilities, can be upgraded, and need to be unlocked) you participate in various challenges and game modes solo, with friends, or on randomly assigned teams. 

A few games in and you only have access to some core “classes” and one game mode. You can play as a standard shooter (This is top down, not FPS) or a bear-summoner early on, each with different attacks and “ultimates” that need to be charged up through combat. After a few rounds, you start to unlock more characters to explore and work up. I unlocked the tanky El Primo early on through a crate, and have been using him as my “main”. Primo does tons of damage at close range and has a giant HP pool, and as I’ve been playing strictly with random people I don’t know, this allows me to take control of an important role in the match.

Harvest Moon Creator Yasuhiro Wada Talks Theming And Why Japanese Gamers Are Returning To Consoles

about X hours ago from
Harvest Moon Creator Yasuhiro Wada Talks Theming And Why Japanese Gamers Are Returning To Consoles

Yasuhiro Wada has been in the industry for over twenty years, which more than qualifies him as a veteran of video game development. As the creator of Harvest Moon, Wada has always held a "mechanics first" ideology that inevitably ends up oozing charm all the same. He took the mantle of president at Marvelous in 2005, then eventually retired from the company in 2011 and founded Toybox Inc. out of a desire to get back to the indie mentality of game development.

Earlier this year, we were able to sit down with Wada for a brief interview about the themes in his games and where he thinks the Japanese industry has been and is going. Wada was being translated by Aksys founder and CEO Akibo Shieh.

So let's backtrack a bit to start with Harvest Moon if you don't mind.

Harvest Moon Creator Yasuhiro Wada Talks Theming And Why Japanese Gamers Are Returning To Consoles

about X hours ago from
Harvest Moon Creator Yasuhiro Wada Talks Theming And Why Japanese Gamers Are Returning To Consoles

Yasuhiro Wada has been in the industry for over twenty years, which more than qualifies him as a veteran of video game development. As the creator of Harvest Moon, Wada has always held a "mechanics first" ideology that inevitably ends up oozing charm all the same. He took the mantle of president at Marvelous in 2005, then eventually retired from the company in 2011 and founded Toybox Inc. out of a desire to get back to the indie mentality of game development.

Earlier this year, we were able to sit down with Wada for a brief interview about the themes in his games and where he thinks the Japanese industry has been and is going. Wada was being translated by Aksys founder and CEO Akibo Shieh.

So let's backtrack a bit to start with Harvest Moon if you don't mind.

Game Informer’s Ultimate Super Fun List: Top Trees In Gaming

about X hours ago from
Game Informer’s Ultimate Super Fun List: Top Trees In Gaming

Ever wonder what are the best trees in gaming? No? Look it’s the holidays and we’re strapped for stories. Let’s just run with this and see what happens.

#1 Deku Tree – Why does the Deku tree outrank every other tree in gaming? Because it’s from The Legend of Zelda, and The Legend of Zelda is like the coolest thing ever. Haven’t you heard? Everything Zelda related should be ranked number one. That’s how journalism works. Also, the Deku Tree has a mustache. Double win.

#2 Teldrassil – The old world tree from World Of Warcraft is home to the Night Elves. Of course, the Night Elves suck because they are part of the Alliance, so we weren’t going to include Teldrassil. However, then we heard that sometimes stupid Night Elf noobs fall off the tree and die, so we moved this tree up to number two. (This isn’t in a Zelda game after all.)

6 New Features That Could Make Artifact Friendlier To Newcomers

about X hours ago from
6 New Features That Could Make Artifact Friendlier To Newcomers

It’s been nearly a month since Artifact released, and it feels like it’s just getting started. Unlike Dota 2, which went through a couple of years of public beta testing before “properly” releasing, Artifact had only a few months of a closed beta and one week of a limited beta for PAX attendees. And although I’m hooked by the way it adds meaningful layers of strategic depth to the digital card game realm, it’s hard not to look at Artifact in its current state and see lots of room for improvement.

Valve has announced it’s committed to the game for the long haul, as it works to improve the game with new features such as in-game chat, colorblind options, expanded gauntlet options, and a recently-added progression system that lets players earn a limited number of card packs and event tickets. After playing the game on and off for about a month, we have some suggestions of our own for what we’d like to see added down the road as Artifact continues to grow.

6 New Features That Could Make Artifact Friendlier To Newcomers

about X hours ago from
6 New Features That Could Make Artifact Friendlier To Newcomers

It’s been nearly a month since Artifact released, and it feels like it’s just getting started. Unlike Dota 2, which went through a couple of years of public beta testing before “properly” releasing, Artifact had only a few months of a closed beta and one week of a limited beta for PAX attendees. And although I’m hooked by the way it adds meaningful layers of strategic depth to the digital card game realm, it’s hard not to look at Artifact in its current state and see lots of room for improvement.

Valve has announced it’s committed to the game for the long haul, as it works to improve the game with new features such as in-game chat, colorblind options, expanded gauntlet options, and a recently-added progression system that lets players earn a limited number of card packs and event tickets. After playing the game on and off for about a month, we have some suggestions of our own for what we’d like to see added down the road as Artifact continues to grow.

Opinion – Red Dead Redemption II's Sophisticated Narrative Is Rockstar's Best

about X hours ago from
Opinion – Red Dead Redemption II's Sophisticated Narrative Is Rockstar's Best

Spoiler warning: Major spoilers for Red Dead Redemption II are in this article. If you haven't completed the campaign, tread carefully.

“You have no idea, Arthur,” Dutch says, his determined and defensive voice echoing off the cave walls in front of him. “I will do whatever it takes for us to survive.”

The threads holding the gang together are loosening, as the once-strong Van der Linde gang finds themselves stranded on a Caribbean island after being stowaways on a ship. Arthur and Dutch scale a cliff and then head into an ominous cave to continue their unpredictable journey. With only the flicker of torchlights to guide them, the darkness feels appropriate; how could Arthur possibly know what lies ahead?

Opinion – Red Dead Redemption II's Sophisticated Narrative Is Rockstar's Best

about X hours ago from
Opinion – Red Dead Redemption II's Sophisticated Narrative Is Rockstar's Best

Spoiler warning: Major spoilers for Red Dead Redemption II are in this article. If you haven't completed the campaign, tread carefully.

“You have no idea, Arthur,” Dutch says, his determined and defensive voice echoing off the cave walls in front of him. “I will do whatever it takes for us to survive.”

The threads holding the gang together are loosening, as the once-strong Van der Linde gang finds themselves stranded on a Caribbean island after being stowaways on a ship. Arthur and Dutch scale a cliff and then head into an ominous cave to continue their unpredictable journey. With only the flicker of torchlights to guide them, the darkness feels appropriate; how could Arthur possibly know what lies ahead?

How Flash Games Changed Video Game History

about X hours ago from
How Flash Games Changed Video Game History

During the ’90s, the internet slowly grew into a massive web of information that eventually reshaped entire industries. But access to that information was slow – it took nearly 10 minutes to download a single song – and web designers were in a constant battle to build splashy websites that didn’t cripple dial-up modems. To solve this problem, a group of engineers at FutureWave Software took a program, originally designed for drawing on tablet computers, and transformed it into a vector graphics animation tool that allowed animated images to swim through phone lines. FutureSplash Animator was eventually shortened to Flash, and it came to dominate the internet.

How Flash Games Changed Video Game History

about X hours ago from
How Flash Games Changed Video Game History

During the ’90s, the internet slowly grew into a massive web of information that eventually reshaped entire industries. But access to that information was slow – it took nearly 10 minutes to download a single song – and web designers were in a constant battle to build splashy websites that didn’t cripple dial-up modems. To solve this problem, a group of engineers at FutureWave Software took a program, originally designed for drawing on tablet computers, and transformed it into a vector graphics animation tool that allowed animated images to swim through phone lines. FutureSplash Animator was eventually shortened to Flash, and it came to dominate the internet.