AEW's Aubrey Edwards On Her Journey Through Game Development, Pro Wrestling, And AEW Games

about X hours ago from
AEW's Aubrey Edwards On Her Journey Through Game Development, Pro Wrestling, And AEW Games

All Elite Wrestling’s Aubrey Edwards is one of the toughest and most popular referees in pro wrestling today. Her penchant for not taking any nonsense from stars like Chris Jericho has made her as beloved as the wrestlers themselves, but before she was laying down the law on AEW Dynamite every Wednesday on TNT, Aubrey Edwards (whose real name is Brittany Aubert) spent 10 years helping bring digital worlds to life in the game industry. 

During her time in the industry, she worked in a variety of roles for several studios, most notably as a producer for the Scribblenauts franchise. With the recent announcement of AEW’s first foray into video games, Aubert finds herself back in the world of game-making, combining her two dream jobs into one. I sat down with Aubert to talk about all things games, including how she fell in love with the medium and what she accomplished during her tenure. She also clarifies what AEW Games is and what her involvement entails. 

AEW fans who have paid attention may have heard Aubert express her love of gaming in interviews, but that side of her life is often a quick talking point in more wrestling-centric discussions. So what types of games does she enjoy? 

Game Of The Year Countdown – #1 The Last Of Us Part II

about X hours ago from
Game Of The Year Countdown – #1 The Last Of Us Part II

Considering the powerful finale of the original The Last of Us, many players questioned whether Joel and Ellie’s story even needed a sequel. After reaching such unprecedented heights, some people assumed developer Naughty Dog had nowhere to go but down. That assumption was wrong; The Last of Us Part II climbs even higher than the original, pushing boundaries and defying expectations to create an unforgettable and heart-wrenching look at the things people do in the name of love.

From the emotional story to the immersive world, The Last of Us Part II is astounding on every level. It picks up five years after the original, with Ellie and Joel settled into a relatively harmonious existence. They live in a commune among family and new friends, attending parties, going on patrols, and surviving in a world still ravaged by the deadly Cordyceps virus. But despite the legions of infected, humans remain an even more dangerous enemy. We won’t spoil any specifics here, but a tragic event upsets Ellie’s new life and sends her on a quest for vengeance.

Click image thumbnails to view larger version

The Top 10 Games Of 2020 – #1 The Last Of Us Part II

about X hours ago from
The Top 10 Games Of 2020 – #1 The Last Of Us Part II

Considering the powerful finale of the original The Last of Us, many players questioned whether Joel and Ellie’s story even needed a sequel. After reaching such unprecedented heights, some people assumed developer Naughty Dog had nowhere to go but down. That assumption was wrong; The Last of Us Part II climbs even higher than the original, pushing boundaries and defying expectations to create an unforgettable and heart-wrenching look at the things people do in the name of love.

From the emotional story to the immersive world, The Last of Us Part II is astounding on every level. It picks up five years after the original, with Ellie and Joel settled into a relatively harmonious existence. They live in a commune among family and new friends, attending parties, going on patrols, and surviving in a world still ravaged by the deadly Cordyceps virus. But despite the legions of infected, humans remain an even more dangerous enemy. We won’t spoil any specifics here, but a tragic event upsets Ellie’s new life and sends her on a quest for vengeance.

Click image thumbnails to view larger version

The Top 10 Games Of 2020 – #2 Hades

about X hours ago from
The Top 10 Games Of 2020 – #2 Hades

From its roots with the constantly narrated storybook experience in Bastion to the futuristic experimentation in Transistor and the wild world of sports with Pyre, Supergiant Games doesn’t attempt to catch the same lightning in a bottle twice. With Hades, the lightning is a veritable superstorm of epic proportions, a roguelike hack-and-slash that transcends the genre with story, style, and speed. Tapping into Greek myth for inspiration, the tale of Zagreus and his escape from the bowels of Hades takes place over many attempts. But this isn’t a game solely for lovers of procedurally generated dungeon rooms, random powerups, and discovering overpowered combinations of weapons and abilities. If one word can convey what makes Hades one of the best games of 2020, it’s cohesion.

Every aspect of Hades feels like it was seamlessly crafted, leading to a compelling gameplay flow enhanced by admirable aesthetics, brilliant voice acting, and immersive music. Giant, sprawling games are often incredible tapestries woven by many entities, yet Hades somehow seems like all the various components of the game came from the same place, syncing up and synergizing in laudable fashion. When Zagreus enters a room with a bold quip and the music amps up, you know it’s time to smash your way out of the underworld with a sword, gauntlet, or gun.

Click image thumbnails to view larger version

Game Of The Year Countdown – #2 Hades

about X hours ago from
Game Of The Year Countdown – #2 Hades

From its roots with the constantly narrated storybook experience in Bastion to the futuristic experimentation in Transistor and the wild world of sports with Pyre, Supergiant Games doesn’t attempt to catch the same lightning in a bottle twice. With Hades, the lightning is a veritable superstorm of epic proportions, a roguelike hack-and-slash that transcends the genre with story, style, and speed. Tapping into Greek myth for inspiration, the tale of Zagreus and his escape from the bowels of Hades takes place over many attempts. But this isn’t a game solely for lovers of procedurally generated dungeon rooms, random powerups, and discovering overpowered combinations of weapons and abilities. If one word can convey what makes Hades one of the best games of 2020, it’s cohesion.

Every aspect of Hades feels like it was seamlessly crafted, leading to a compelling gameplay flow enhanced by admirable aesthetics, brilliant voice acting, and immersive music. Giant, sprawling games are often incredible tapestries woven by many entities, yet Hades somehow seems like all the various components of the game came from the same place, syncing up and synergizing in laudable fashion. When Zagreus enters a room with a bold quip and the music amps up, you know it’s time to smash your way out of the underworld with a sword, gauntlet, or gun.

Click image thumbnails to view larger version

Game Of The Year Countdown – #3 Ghost Of Tsushima

about X hours ago from
Game Of The Year Countdown – #3 Ghost Of Tsushima

Audiences finally got the open-world samurai game they longed for this year, thanks to Sucker Punch Productions and its stellar Ghost of Tsushima. It skillfully marries stealth action and visceral swordplay, letting players protect Japan from a large-scale Mongol invasion however they see fit. And even though it tells an epic story of love, betrayal, and honor, it’s filled with moments of quiet contemplation that let players fully absorb the effects of their actions.

Protagonist Jin Sakai is a young noble torn between acting honorably while up against insurmountable odds. Under the brutal leadership of Khotun Khan, hordes of invaders have slaughtered the protector samurai class and butchered anyone on the island of Tsushima who stands in their way of eventually claiming greater Japan. Sakai’s uncle, Lord Shimura, believes the only way to fight back is by doing so the traditional way: battling enemies in face-to-face combat. Once Shimura is captured, Sakai discovers a new path, one based on deception and subterfuge.

Click image thumbnails to view larger version

The Top 10 Games Of 2020 – #3 Ghost Of Tsushima

about X hours ago from
The Top 10 Games Of 2020 – #3 Ghost Of Tsushima

Audiences finally got the open-world samurai game they longed for this year, thanks to Sucker Punch Productions and its stellar Ghost of Tsushima. It skillfully marries stealth action and visceral swordplay, letting players protect Japan from a large-scale Mongol invasion however they see fit. And even though it tells an epic story of love, betrayal, and honor, it’s filled with moments of quiet contemplation that let players fully absorb the effects of their actions.

Protagonist Jin Sakai is a young noble torn between acting honorably while up against insurmountable odds. Under the brutal leadership of Khotun Khan, hordes of invaders have slaughtered the protector samurai class and butchered anyone on the island of Tsushima who stands in their way of eventually claiming greater Japan. Sakai’s uncle, Lord Shimura, believes the only way to fight back is by doing so the traditional way: battling enemies in face-to-face combat. Once Shimura is captured, Sakai discovers a new path, one based on deception and subterfuge.

Click image thumbnails to view larger version

The Top 10 Games Of 2020 – #4 Yakuza: Like A Dragon

about X hours ago from
The Top 10 Games Of 2020 – #4 Yakuza: Like A Dragon

In a year where we could all use an extra dose of kindness and lighthearted fun, Yakuza: Like a Dragon delivers in droves. Not only does it debut a new series protagonist with Ichiban Kasuga, but it also transforms the series’ action-centric combat into a turn-based RPG with depth beyond throwing your fists around. Battles turn into tense encounters focused on exploiting elemental weaknesses, utilizing buffs/debuffs, and kicking enemies when they’re down for extra damage. And, let’s not forget summoning in some help from unlikely places like “Poundmates” when things get really dire.

Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio goes all-in with its RPG inspiration, making the main character a diehard Dragon Quest fan and having you help strangers and bond with party members Persona-style. Among the massive list of side activities, there’s even a “gotta catch ‘em all” system where you collect “Sujimon” for a professor. If that’s not enough, you can swap jobs, becoming everything from a break dancer to a chef for entertaining ways to take on the enemy.

Click image thumbnails to view larger version

Game Of The Year Countdown – #4 Yakuza: Like A Dragon

about X hours ago from
Game Of The Year Countdown – #4 Yakuza: Like A Dragon

In a year where we could all use an extra dose of kindness and lighthearted fun, Yakuza: Like a Dragon delivers in droves. Not only does it debut a new series protagonist with Ichiban Kasuga, but it also transforms the series’ action-centric combat into a turn-based RPG with depth beyond throwing your fists around. Battles turn into tense encounters focused on exploiting elemental weaknesses, utilizing buffs/debuffs, and kicking enemies when they’re down for extra damage. And, let’s not forget summoning in some help from unlikely places like “Poundmates” when things get really dire.

Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio goes all-in with its RPG inspiration, making the main character a diehard Dragon Quest fan and having you help strangers and bond with party members Persona-style. Among the massive list of side activities, there’s even a “gotta catch ‘em all” system where you collect “Sujimon” for a professor. If that’s not enough, you can swap jobs, becoming everything from a break dancer to a chef for entertaining ways to take on the enemy.

Click image thumbnails to view larger version

Game Of The Year Countdown – #5 Ori And The Will Of The Wisps

about X hours ago from
Game Of The Year Countdown – #5 Ori And The Will Of The Wisps

Ori and the Will of the Wisps has some of the best setpieces we’ve ever played. Unlike the Uncharted or Spider-Man games, where bombastic sequences are basically cutscenes with a few button prompts, Ori never takes you out of the moment, no matter how intense. The game always wants you in control of the action. 

Control is what makes this game special. A precise 2D platformer lives and dies by how responsive it feels, and Ori rarely drops the ball in this regard. Exploring its beautiful world, mastering its obstacles, and marveling at its numerous setpieces and boss fights, Ori has some of the tightest gameplay we’ve ever experienced. It’s a game you never want to tear yourself away from; you want to see the next part of the world and best the challenges it contains, all while remaining fully in control of what is happening on screen – whether you’re succeeding or failing. 

Click image thumbnails to view larger version