Top Of The Table – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shadows Of The Past

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Top Of The Table – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shadows Of The Past

If you’ve grown up in any time since the early 1980s, you’ve likely had one or another version of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles embedded in your childhood consciousness. These four green sewer-dwelling heroes have fought it out with the baddies in cartoons, movies, toys, video games, and comics, and many of those adventures have been great and action-packed. But this is the first time I can recall being excited about a tabletop iteration of the universe. TMNT: Shadows of the Past is a stellar interpretation of the long-running license, offering opportunities for cooperation, pitched combat, slick movement options, and lots of fun characterization, and it scratches any itch you might have to reenter the world of these teenage heroes, no matter which version you recall best. 

Meet The Actor Behind Breath Of The Wild's Princess Zelda

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Meet The Actor Behind Breath Of The Wild's Princess Zelda

If you've played The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, you know that Princess Zelda has a lot weighing on her shoulders in that game. The same could be said Patricia Summersett, the first voice actor tasked with portraying Princess Zelda in a mainline Zelda game. On the latest episode of The Game Informer Show podcast, Ben Hanson Skyped in Summersett to talk about the process of working with Nintendo, finding the right British accent, and bringing Zelda to life.

You can watch the interview below or subscribe and listen to the audio on iTunes or Google Play.

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What The Heck Is This? Episode 4

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What The Heck Is This? Episode 4

We cover a lot of big, well-known games here at Game Informer. Thanks to these efforts, you (hopefully) know all about the next big franchise, or the highly-anticipated new game from that notable indie developer What about those random games that fly under the radar? The one among the dozens that release every day on Steam? Or that Xbox One game with the weird title? This new video series is an attempt to highlight those games – for better or worse.

We see these type of games all of the time. The game that we look at and say, "What the heck is that?" This is our chance to play them and decide, on the spot, if we want to keep playing them, or move on to to something different.

Today we look at two games: Plutonium: Distorted Shelter, a story-driven adventure seen through the eyes (or eye) of a robotic being, and Die With Glory, a puzzle adventure about a viking who just wants to die in a meaningful way. Stick around to the end of the episode to hear if we want to keep playing either of these games.

Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (May 11, 2017)

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Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (May 11, 2017)

Another week, another Blog Herding edition – and that means another collection of compelling blogs to read.

Community Blogs For May 4 – May 10:

Should You Be Playing Rivals of Aether? It's been a while since ConnorTrinske wrote a blog, but he's back to tell you all about this Steam Early Access title. The game is a "Smash-like," so similar to Super Smash Bros. Connor gives the game high praise, saying it may even be better than the Smash Bros. series when it comes to gameplay. However, it is hampered by the roster, as well as content. I enjoy Smash so much and feel like it has so much to offer that I can't just go and play yet another Smash game. How about you?

Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First 25 Hours

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Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First 25 Hours

Last year, over the course of four months, we played through Shenmue for the Dreamcast in its entirety. It was an experimental video series, with an undefined schedule that allowed us to take in all the feedback for each episode by reading and responding to comments in (almost) real time. The experiment was a success! So we immediately decided (after playing through Dark Souls III, Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon, Shadow of the Colossus, and Resident Evil 4) that there was no time like the present to return to Yu Suzuki's masterpiece. For the sequel, we're playing the Xbox version that was published by Microsoft in 2002.

RPG Grind Time – The Magic Of The 16-Bit Era

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RPG Grind Time – The Magic Of The 16-Bit Era

Looking back on my life of playing RPGs, nothing stands out quite like the 16-bit era, especially the SNES library. This period was long after I first touched the genre, but it’s when RPGs really started dominating my gaming habits. A lot of different factors have to do with why I find this time so formative to my RPG devotion, but I really feel these early games captured something timeless. 

This era was the first time I remember really being affected by storytelling in a game. Secret of Mana’s banishment scene still hits me right in the gut, as does Final Fantasy VI's dark storyline. VI’s small narrative moments said so much, such as its coin toss scene (although, let’s also give Final Fantasy IV some props for opening the door for dramatic storytelling.) This was also the first time I saw that RPGs could be silly and break the fourth wall à la Earthbound. Chrono Trigger didn’t change the direction of RPGs, but it hit every note as high as possible, including novel ideas such as a New Game+ feature and double and triple-techs. All of these games made me fall in love with the genre.  

A Guide To Sneaking Through Prey (Relatively) Unscathed

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A Guide To Sneaking Through Prey (Relatively) Unscathed

Welcome to Talos-1! This sprawling space station orbiting the Earth’s moon operates on the cutting edge of bioscience. The state-of-the-art laboratories and Neo Deco aesthetics are a sight to behold in those brief moments between dangerous encounters with the Typhon alien threat. 

The mimics, phantoms, and nightmares roaming the halls are not the welcoming committee – get too close and they will F you up with fire, electricity, or sheer physical dominance. Ammo is scarce and protagonist scientist Morgan Yu’s no super soldier, so we strongly recommend you develop a gameplay style that incorporates stealth elements to increase your chances for survival. Here are some tips for sticking to the shadows. 

GENERAL ADVICESome of this goes without saying, but minimize the noise you make moving through environments by crouching until you know what you’re up against. If you see an item that looks out of place, it’s probably one of those pesky mimics just waiting to pounce on you. Once you acquire the Psychoscope, you can sweep a room visually to see if that nearby chair is actually a threat in disguise. To do this, press the Z key on PC or press the right analog stick in on consoles. Once mimics are detected, you’ll see their tag even if they shapeshift into another form.

Science-Fiction Weekly – A Second Opinion On Prey

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Science-Fiction Weekly – A Second Opinion On Prey

After spending two hours with Arkane Studios' Prey, I thought it was soulless and punishing, a game with a blank slate of a protagonist who always seemed to have his or her back against the wall. Prey's introductory moments focus intently on defining Morgan Yu, letting the player determine how this character handles situations, yet no voice is provided. We learn Yu is a lab rat of sorts, entering white room after white room to handle a series of bizarre requests. The testing goes off of the rails, yet Yu doesn't react in any way. I found the lack of character input to be jarring and almost comical. This is one of those instances where the silent protagonist approach hurts the narrative. I ended up feeling like a ghostly figure walking through a chaotic moment. The events at hand are fascinating and succeed in turning Prey's science-fiction world into a terrifying place, but I didn't feel connected to it.

Opinion – Sony And Nintendo Should Follow Microsoft’s Backward-Compatibility Example

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Opinion – Sony And Nintendo Should Follow Microsoft’s Backward-Compatibility Example

At E3 2015, Microsoft revealed backward compatibility would be a big push for Xbox One going forward. The company promised around 100 games available as the functionality launched that fall, with many more to come on a regular basis. The promise seemed lofty, maybe even improbable, at the time. We poked some fun at the marketing, but at the end of the day, Microsoft has not only delivered on its promise, it has exceeded all expectations by adding new titles at a blistering pace.

Unlike its competition from Sony and Nintendo, Microsoft's backward compatibility is built into the system's operating system itself thanks to Microsoft's Universal Windows Platform. That means not only are games you already own on Xbox 360 completely free to play on Xbox One once they are added to the backward-compatibility list, but they automatically appear in your library alongside your Xbox One games if you own them digitally. This simplified approach to backward compatibility is a breath of fresh air. The idea that "it just works" harkens back to what makes consoles so attractive in the first place.