Square Enix President Talks Innovation And The Impact Of Final Fantasy XV

about X hours ago from
Square Enix President Talks Innovation And The Impact Of Final Fantasy XV

Final Fantasy XV had a tall order of pleasing old fans, while also reaching a new audience. The entry was a departure from what we'd previously seen, tackling a more open world and taking combat in a more action-oriented direction. Before the game was released, director Hajime Tabata said it was  "make or break for the franchise" and acknowledged it was a dying IP that lacked brand recognition in our 2016 cover story. At this past E3, Square Enix CEO and president Yosuke Matsuda was on hand for interviews and we asked him if he felt Final Fantasy XV had raised the profile of the series. 

"Yes, I think it did do that because we tried lots of different things with [Final Fantasy XV]," he said. "Among the titles in that series, I think it was quite unique. And I also understand that not just the fans from back in the day, but also lots of new, young players also played it. In that sense, I think it really had a significant contribution in that context."

Everything We Know About The Story Of Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

about X hours ago from
Everything We Know About The Story Of Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

During our trip to Respawn for our Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order cover story we spent a lot of time with the developers talking about the process of designing and creating a new canonical Star Wars video game, played with the lightsaber combat extensively, and watched a handful of hands-off demos through various levels. We also talked about the story, but that was the element the game’s director, Stig Asmussen, was the most hesitant to offer extensive details about. His reticence is understandable as it is the element that hides the most surprises and is the most prone to spoilers. We got some spoiler-free details out of Asmussen and the team though, and we shared many of them in our cover story (which you can read in full here), but we wanted to take this opportunity to share everything we know so far.

Everything We Know About The Story Of Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

about X hours ago from
Everything We Know About The Story Of Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

During our trip to Respawn for our Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order cover story we spent a lot of time with the developers talking about the process of designing and creating a new canonical Star Wars video game, played with the lightsaber combat extensively, and watched a handful of hands-off demos through various levels. We also talked about the story, but that was the element the game’s director, Stig Asmussen, was the most hesitant to offer extensive details about. His reticence is understandable as it is the element that hides the most surprises and is the most prone to spoilers. We got some spoiler-free details out of Asmussen and the team though, and we shared many of them in our cover story (which you can read in full here), but we wanted to take this opportunity to share everything we know so far.

10 Pokémon That Should Exist But Don't

about X hours ago from
10 Pokémon That Should Exist But Don't

Back in 2016, we gave our ideas for 10 Pokémon based on real life that deserve to exist. That was before the launch of Pokémon Sun & Moon, and Game Freak seems to have ignored every last one of our ideas – even the one about a Pokémon that’s a truck! This must have been a mistake, so we’re offering Game Freak the opportunity to make things right by putting all of the following ideas into the upcoming Pokémon Sword and Shield. No need to thank us, Junichi. These ideas are free.

This little guy is known for its similar appearance to German emperor Wilheim II, but unlike Wilheim, the tamarin is actually a good dad. (We’re not historians, but what emperor has ever been a good father?) It’s also adorable (Sorry, Will). There’s even an upcoming game based around the tamarin, although it isn’t of the emperor variety.

The emperor tamarin is a social animal, forming bonds with both other members of its species and even humans, so it might evolve through friendship with its trainer instead of levels. It would be normal-type to start with, but could become grass-type with its evolution. This evolution could take the creature’s beard to the next level, reaching Jeff Cork levels of majesty and growing in pride, becoming tall and bipedal (Also like Jeff Cork).

Are You A Fan Of Neon Genesis Evangelion? Check Out These Games

about X hours ago from
Are You A Fan Of Neon Genesis Evangelion? Check Out These Games

The classic anime Neon Genesis Evangelion hits Netflix today. If you haven't seen the show, it's basically a gut-wrenching sci-fi tale about people confronting the demons within themselves while trying not to break under the weight of a looming apocalypse. Also, it has giant smashy mechas that tear kaiju monsters to bits and alcoholic ne'er do well penguins that serve as comedic relief.

Evangelion, to its most ardent fans, is more than just grimdark Gundam. It's a messy epic about broken people told within the confines of classic sci-fi tropes. Expectations are subverted at every turn, and characters are not so easily categorized with labels like "hero" and "villain," or even "likable" versus "unlikeable." The most compelling thing about Evangelion in the end is that its characters are as close to real people (deeply flawed but deserving of sympathy) as fiction gets. There's no other show quite like it. Even the anime that draws inspiration from (and comparisons to) Evangelion never quite manage to hit the same balance.

Are You A Fan Of Neon Genesis Evangelion? Check Out These Games

about X hours ago from
Are You A Fan Of Neon Genesis Evangelion? Check Out These Games

The classic anime Neon Genesis Evangelion hits Netflix today. If you haven't seen the show, it's basically a gut-wrenching sci-fi tale about people confronting the demons within themselves while trying not to break under the weight of a looming apocalypse. Also, it has giant smashy mechas that tear kaiju monsters to bits and alcoholic ne'er do well penguins that serve as comedic relief.

Evangelion, to its most ardent fans, is more than just grimdark Gundam. It's a messy epic about broken people told within the confines of classic sci-fi tropes. Expectations are subverted at every turn, and characters are not so easily categorized with labels like "hero" and "villain," or even "likable" versus "unlikeable." The most compelling thing about Evangelion in the end is that its characters are as close to real people (deeply flawed but deserving of sympathy) as fiction gets. There's no other show quite like it. Even the anime that draws inspiration from (and comparisons to) Evangelion never quite manage to hit the same balance.

Game Informer's Best Of E3 2019 Awards

about X hours ago from
Game Informer's Best Of E3 2019 Awards

2019 marked an odd year for E3, with former fixture Sony's absence and the rise of streaming-focused game tech front-and-center. However, as always, gaming's biggest trade show played its pivotal role in laying out what we can expect from the rest of this year and next. Whether brutal first-person shooters, imaginative platformers, or ambitious RPGs are your jam, there was something special for everyone.

We sat down to discuss which games from this year's various presentations and showfloor demos left us the most excited. Here are the best of the best – the games we absolutely can't wait to get our hands on.

The last two Watch Dogs games have been quite ambitious (sometimes to the point of being flawed), but Legion's scope is maddening. Instead of playing a protagonist, you have a whole city of resistance fighters at your disposal to wage war against fascists, which leads to some pretty incredible moments that you can read about in our hands-on preview here.

Game Informer's Best Of E3 2019 Awards

about X hours ago from
Game Informer's Best Of E3 2019 Awards

2019 marked an odd year for E3, with former fixture Sony's absence and the rise of streaming-focused game tech front-and-center. However, as always, gaming's biggest trade show played its pivotal role in laying out what we can expect from the rest of this year and next. Whether brutal first-person shooters, imaginative platformers, or ambitious RPGs are your jam, there was something special for everyone.

We sat down to discuss which games from this year's various presentations and showfloor demos left us the most excited. Here are the best of the best – the games we absolutely can't wait to get our hands on.

The last two Watch Dogs games have been quite ambitious (sometimes to the point of being flawed), but Legion's scope is maddening. Instead of playing a protagonist, you have a whole city of resistance fighters at your disposal to wage war against fascists, which leads to some pretty incredible moments that you can read about in our hands-on preview here.

Sitting In On A Design Meeting For Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

about X hours ago from
Sitting In On A Design Meeting For Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

While visiting Respawn to learn more about Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order for this month’s cover story, we had a unique opportunity to do something I personally had never done despite having visited various game studios for assorted features and cover stories during my seven or so years with Game Informer.

Alongside our filming, interview, and hands-on opportunities, Respawn also invited us to sit in on a design meeting for one area in Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order. We can’t describe in detail what the level looked like, its enemies, or what the planet was called (they wouldn’t tell us anyway, despite us lobbing guesses at them), but we can say that it was a much darker, potentially creepier location than what we have seen from the game so far.

Andrew Reiner, Leo Vader, and I sat in the meeting interjecting as little as possible while the team discussed what was working with the level, what they wanted to change, and how they predicted players would react to the level’s layout and enemy encounters. It offered interesting insight into Respawn’s game design process, so Leo Vader and I decided to talk about the meeting and what we took away from it.

Sitting In On A Design Meeting For Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

about X hours ago from
Sitting In On A Design Meeting For Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

While visiting Respawn to learn more about Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order for this month’s cover story, we had a unique opportunity to do something I personally had never done despite having visited various game studios for assorted features and cover stories during my seven or so years with Game Informer.

Alongside our filming, interview, and hands-on opportunities, Respawn also invited us to sit in on a design meeting for one area in Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order. We can’t describe in detail what the level looked like, its enemies, or what the planet was called (they wouldn’t tell us anyway, despite us lobbing guesses at them), but we can say that it was a much darker, potentially creepier location than what we have seen from the game so far.

Andrew Reiner, Leo Vader, and I sat in the meeting interjecting as little as possible while the team discussed what was working with the level, what they wanted to change, and how they predicted players would react to the level’s layout and enemy encounters. It offered interesting insight into Respawn’s game design process, so Leo Vader and I decided to talk about the meeting and what we took away from it.