Grand Theft Auto IV Remains The Most Important GTA

about X hours ago from
Grand Theft Auto IV Remains The Most Important GTA

I grew up in the era when Grand Theft Auto was basically contraband. In 2003, my friends and I pitched in to buy a copy of Vice City and shared it amongst one another, out of the eyesight of our parents, who had all been worked into a fearful frenzy by articles in USA Today about the game’s prostitution and violent propensities. Grand Theft Auto wasn’t just a game to us but was a central part of our adolescence, the kind of all-caps MATURE thing we experienced as an act of rebellion as much as a fun doodad to pass the time.

Grand Theft Auto IV came at a strange time. I wasn’t even playing games at that point anymore, having ditched my consoles when I went to college in 2007 in an effort to focus on my studies and become a world-renowned author™. However, I still found myself drawn to IV, not because it was the next-gen version of GTA, but because so much of that game spoke to a thematic evolution that I was interested in. Head-down in books like The Great Gatsby and The Crying Of Lot 49, GTA IV’s somber take on finding yourself lost in the bleak tunnels of The American Dream as a poor person while the rich get stupider, crueler, and richer spoke to me. I spent countless hours on a friend’s Xbox 360 to complete the game, eagerly playing through the sad tale of Niko Bellic.

Watch Media Molecule Talk About How They Made Our Cover

about X hours ago from
Watch Media Molecule Talk About How They Made Our Cover

Update: Media Molecule is live, talking about how artist  Jon Eckersley made our cover in Dreams. Tune in here!

Original story (October 10 at 9:50 AM Central): In case you missed it, our cover this month is all about Media Molecule's Dreams. A fun little wrinkle: the developers actually made our spiffy looking cover in Dreams.

Don't believe me? Check out this snippet below:

Watch Media Molecule Talk About How They Made Our Cover

about X hours ago from
Watch Media Molecule Talk About How They Made Our Cover

Update: Here's the video of Media Molecule taking a behind the scenes look at how the developer made our cover:

Original Story: Did you know our cover for Dreams was made in the game itself? Don't believe me? Check out this snippet below:

Fun fact: Game Informer's new cover on @MediaMolecule's Dreams was made entirely in Dreams itself. Here's proof... https://t.co/6kbLqmCpmf pic.twitter.com/tlN4C0gGlI

Watch Media Molecule Talk About How They Made Our Cover In Dreams Tomorrow

about X hours ago from
Watch Media Molecule Talk About How They Made Our Cover In Dreams Tomorrow

In case you missed it, our cover this month is all about Media Molecule's Dreams. A fun little wrinkle: the developers actually made our spiffy looking cover in Dreams.

Don't believe me? Check out this snippet below:

Fun fact: Game Informer's new cover on @MediaMolecule's Dreams was made entirely in Dreams itself. Here's proof... https://t.co/6kbLqmCpmf pic.twitter.com/tlN4C0gGlI

Ranking The Overwatch Halloween Skins

about X hours ago from
Ranking The Overwatch Halloween Skins

It's that time of year again. We've reached October, which means Overwatch's Halloween celebration is in full swing. The Terror event, which just went live today, has its share of special treats, such as the wave-based horde mode Junkenstein's Revenge, alongside new Halloween-themed skins, emotes, and voice lines. Every year, Blizzard raises the bar with its Halloween designs, making it a true contender for the best event skins. While the first year capitalized on its Junkenstein theme of basic (but super cool) Halloween fare, subsequent years have thrown us some nice surprises, from the far out Totally '80s Zarya to the Cthulhu-inspired cultist Zenyatta. As the skins are the main attraction, we decided to rank all of them from worst to best. After much deliberation and compromise, here's what we came up with as a staff for our favorite and not-so favorites.

Part of this might be our disdain for Bastion mains, but this skin also isn't that great. The color scheme and "RIP" text is true to the holiday, but it's not something you'll worry about if the loot box gods don't bestow it upon you.

Ranking The Overwatch Halloween Skins

about X hours ago from
Ranking The Overwatch Halloween Skins

It's that time of year again. We've reached October, which means Overwatch's Halloween celebration is in full swing. The Terror event, which just went live today, has its share of special treats, such as the wave-based horde mode Junkenstein's Revenge, alongside new Halloween-themed skins, emotes, and voice lines. Every year, Blizzard raises the bar with its Halloween designs, making it a true contender for the best event skins. While the first year capitalized on its Junkenstein theme of basic (but super cool) Halloween fare, subsequent years have thrown us some nice surprises, from the far out Totally '80s Zarya to the Cthulhu-inspired cultist Zenyatta. As the skins are the main attraction, we decided to rank all of them from worst to best. After much deliberation and compromise, here's what we came up with as a staff for our favorite and not-so favorites.

Part of this might be our disdain for Bastion mains, but this skin also isn't that great. The color scheme and "RIP" text is true to the holiday, but it's not something you'll worry about if the loot box gods don't bestow it upon you.

FIFA 19 On The Switch

about X hours ago from
FIFA 19 On The Switch

EA Sports hasn't wholesale supported the Nintendo Switch, but the FIFA franchise has returned to the system for its second iteration. While we aren't doing a proper review of the game, in some ways it's not necessary because much of FIFA 19 is the same as the previous title. Nevertheless, I played the title for a little bit and have some observations to share.

As you may expect, FIFA 19 does not feel like FIFA 19 on the other systems. Instead, it shares some similarities with last year's Switch product in that overall gameplay feels loose, possibly a result of getting caught in lagging animations and/or the game not giving you full control over the ball and your interactions with other players. For instance, 50/50 balls were a specific point of emphasis for FIFA 19 on the other consoles, and here you get none of that. When two players come together you are drawn into a pre-determined animation that encompasses what the players do as well as where the ball goes.

A smaller difference, but a difference nonetheless, is that this version doesn't include the new situational tactics that allow you to change your formation and strategy when you change your d-pad tactics – a nice feature from this year found on the PS4, Xbox One, and PC.

FIFA 19 On The Switch

about X hours ago from
FIFA 19 On The Switch

EA Sports hasn't wholesale supported the Nintendo Switch, but the FIFA franchise has returned to the system for its second iteration. While we aren't doing a proper review of the game, in some ways it's not necessary because much of FIFA 19 is the same as the previous title. Nevertheless, I played the title for a little bit and have some observations to share.

As you may expect, FIFA 19 does not feel like FIFA 19 on the other systems. Instead, it shares some similarities with last year's Switch product in that overall gameplay feels loose, possibly a result of getting caught in lagging animations and/or the game not giving you full control over the ball and your interactions with other players. For instance, 50/50 balls were a specific point of emphasis for FIFA 19 on the other consoles, and here you get none of that. When two players come together you are drawn into a pre-determined animation that encompasses what the players do as well as where the ball goes.

A smaller difference, but a difference nonetheless, is that this version doesn't include the new situational tactics that allow you to change your formation and strategy when you change your d-pad tactics – a nice feature from this year found on the PS4, Xbox One, and PC.

Here Are The Characters In Dreams' Story Mode

about X hours ago from
Here Are The Characters In Dreams' Story Mode

Though much of Dreams’ appeal is rooted in its creation tools and the potential for players to make the games they’ve always dreamed of, Media Molecule’s story mode looks to be a promising journey through a strange and emotionally heavy space. We talked with narrative designer Cara Ellison to get a better grasp on this wild, surreal story. Here are the key players of the tale and what you can expect from them.

Art The protagonist, a musician with a haunted past, and the man whose shifting mind serves as home to the story itself. “The story is essentially about ­him ­finding­ his way back to being able to collaborate and play music with other people again and enrich his life.”

Francis and Foxy
Art and Laila’s toys from childhood, as well as Art and Laila’s alter egos in some of the sequences in Dreams, the plush animals are more than the cutesy animals they appear to be. “Francis tends to be a little bit more wild and­ interested ­in ­thrashing­ stuff­ up. Foxy­ is ­a ­bit ­more ­wily­ and wants to stand back and essentially search the situation out a bit before he does anything.”

Here Are The Characters In Dreams' Story Mode

about X hours ago from
Here Are The Characters In Dreams' Story Mode

Though much of Dreams’ appeal is rooted in its creation tools and the potential for players to make the games they’ve always dreamed of, Media Molecule’s story mode looks to be a promising journey through a strange and emotionally heavy space. We talked with narrative designer Cara Ellison to get a better grasp on this wild, surreal story. Here are the key players of the tale and what you can expect from them.

Art The protagonist, a musician with a haunted past, and the man whose shifting mind serves as home to the story itself. “The story is essentially about ­him ­finding­ his way back to being able to collaborate and play music with other people again and enrich his life.”

Frances and Foxy
Art and Laila’s toys from childhood, as well as Art and Laila’s alter egos in some of the sequences in Dreams, the plush animals are more than the cutesy animals they appear to be. “Frances tends to be a little bit more wild and­ interested ­in ­thrashing­ stuff­ up. Foxy­ is ­a ­bit ­more ­wily­ and wants to stand back and essentially search the situation out a bit before he does anything.”