Question Of The Month: What Historical Era Should Games Explore?

about X hours ago from
Question Of The Month: What Historical Era Should Games Explore?

In issue 302, we asked readers what historical moment or era they’d like to see explored in a video game. Now it’s your turn to weigh in.

Video games have explored a number of time periods over the years, from decades-old conflicts in series like Battlefield and Call of Duty, to the time-traveling tourism of Assassin’s Creed. However, history still offers plenty of intriguing eras and important moments that would be fascinating to explore in digital form.

When we posed the question to G.I.’s magazine subscribers, readers offered a number of enticing ideas, from a Mafia-style crime sim based on the Prohibition era, to an open-world take on Oregon Trail that follows the Lewis and Clark Expedition. But enough about them! We want to hear YOUR pitch for a killer game based on a specific historical moment or setting.

Question Of The Month: What Historical Era Should Games Explore?

about X hours ago from
Question Of The Month: What Historical Era Should Games Explore?

In issue 302, we asked readers what historical moment or era they’d like to see explored in a video game. Now it’s your turn to weigh in.

Video games have explored a number of time periods over the years, from decades-old conflicts in series like Battlefield and Call of Duty, to the time-traveling tourism of Assassin’s Creed. However, history still offers plenty of intriguing eras and important moments that would be fascinating to explore in digital form.

When we posed the question to G.I.’s magazine subscribers, readers offered a number of enticing ideas, from a Mafia-style crime sim based on the Prohibition era, to an open-world take on Oregon Trail that follows the Lewis and Clark Expedition. But enough about them! We want to hear YOUR pitch for a killer game based on a specific historical moment or setting.

From Final Fantasy to Star Citizen, The Longest Waits In Gaming History

about X hours ago from
From Final Fantasy to Star Citizen, The Longest Waits In Gaming History

“It's been over 2077 days since we announced our plan to develop Cyberpunk 2077.” This is how CD Projekt Red started their letter to fans, hidden within the trailer they dropped at E3. Cyberpunk’s original trailer was in 2013, but the studio announced their plans to develop the property even earlier. Six years (and counting!) may feel like an eternity, but it’s far from the longest wait we’ve had for a game.

From JRPGS to trash-talking shooters, let’s forget our impatience for Cyberpunk by looking at some of the longest waits in gaming history.

2006 was a thrilling time to be a Final Fantasy fan. Not only was Final Fantasy XIII announced, it debuted alongside a trailer for an entirely separate game, Final Fantasy XIII Versus. Versus promised to be a dark adventure with real-time combat and an enigmatic protagonist. But as time stretched on, Versus missed a concerning number of events. Square Enix promised that development was continuing (first it was a PS3 exclusive, then it wasn’t, then it was again…), but it was easy to lose hope as the years stretched on.

From Final Fantasy to Star Citizen, The Longest Waits In Gaming History

about X hours ago from
From Final Fantasy to Star Citizen, The Longest Waits In Gaming History

“It's been over 2077 days since we announced our plan to develop Cyberpunk 2077.” This is how CD Projekt Red started their letter to fans, hidden within the trailer they dropped at E3. Cyberpunk’s original trailer was in 2013, but the studio announced their plans to develop the property even earlier. Six years (and counting!) may feel like an eternity, but it’s far from the longest wait we’ve had for a game.

From JRPGS to trash-talking shooters, let’s forget our impatience for Cyberpunk by looking at some of the longest waits in gaming history.

2006 was a thrilling time to be a Final Fantasy fan. Not only was Final Fantasy XIII announced, it debuted alongside a trailer for an entirely separate game, Final Fantasy XIII Versus. Versus promised to be a dark adventure with real-time combat and an enigmatic protagonist. But as time stretched on, Versus missed a concerning number of events. Square Enix promised that development was continuing (first it was a PS3 exclusive, then it wasn’t, then it was again…), but it was easy to lose hope as the years stretched on.

New Gameplay Today – Hypnospace Outlaw

about X hours ago from
New Gameplay Today – Hypnospace Outlaw

Hypnospace Outlaw had me from the moment I saw its first trailer. I'm fairly immune to nostalgia plays, but something about Tendershoot's earnest and authentic-looking take on '90s internet hit home – from the highly compressed video to its dithered graphics and enthusiastic abundance of rotating gifs. In today's episode of New Gameplay Today, I guide Joe Juba and Leo Vader through much of the game's beta content.

In the game, you play as an online enforcer, whose job is to scour Hypnospace for rule violations. They can include things such as copyright violations, harassment, and countercurrency. When you find violations, you can flag them and get paid. The trick comes down to figuring out where to look for them. Check out the episode for a look at what it's like to be an enforcer, as well as a glimpse at some of the other silly ways you can pass time in the game. You like virtual pets and horrible WinAMP skins...?

Hypnospace Outlaw is set for a late 2018 release on PC.

New Gameplay Today – Hypnospace Outlaw

about X hours ago from
New Gameplay Today – Hypnospace Outlaw

Hypnospace Outlaw had me from the moment I saw its first trailer. I'm fairly immune to nostalgia plays, but something about Tendershoot's earnest and authentic-looking take on '90s internet hit home – from the highly compressed video to its dithered graphics and enthusiastic abundance of rotating gifs. In today's episode of New Gameplay Today, I guide Joe Juba and Leo Vader through much of the game's beta content.

In the game, you play as an online enforcer, whose job is to scour Hypnospace for rule violations. They can include things such as copyright violations, harassment, and countercurrency. When you find violations, you can flag them and get paid. The trick comes down to figuring out where to look for them. Check out the episode for a look at what it's like to be an enforcer, as well as a glimpse at some of the other silly ways you can pass time in the game. You like virtual pets and horrible WinAMP skins...?

Hypnospace Outlaw is set for a late 2018 release on PC.

Reggie Fils-Aimé Sheds Light On The Future Of Switch And His Progress In Breath Of The Wild

about X hours ago from
Reggie Fils-Aimé Sheds Light On The Future Of Switch And His Progress In Breath Of The Wild

At this year's Electronic Entertainment Expo, I was given the chance to speak to Reggie Fils-Aimé, Nintendo of America's president and chief operating officer. In this talk, Reggie outlines what we can expect from Nintendo for Switch, 3DS, and the Classic line of retro consoles in 2018. He doesn't give away any surprises, but did go off script a bit to talk about his playthrough of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, and his fear of looking at how many hours he's logged into it.

Talk to me a little bit about your philosophy for the Nintendo Direct. Last year we saw some games that were kind of far out, holding the promise that a series was coming back. This year, it seems like, even with games in the hopper, you scaled back.

Broadly speaking, our focus at every E3 is driven by a handful of factors. One, we want to show games that are typically near in and our fans can look forward to purchasing relatively soon. Second, we always look at the total array of content, and decide what is the best thing to do – whether it’s a competition like we have this year, or some other key tactic. Every year is different, and every year is based on the content that is available.

Reggie Fils-Aimé Sheds Light On The Future Of Switch And His Progress In Breath Of The Wild

about X hours ago from
Reggie Fils-Aimé Sheds Light On The Future Of Switch And His Progress In Breath Of The Wild

At this year's Electronic Entertainment Expo, I was given the chance to speak to Reggie Fils-Aimé, Nintendo of America's president and chief operating officer. In this talk, Reggie outlines what we can expect from Nintendo for Switch, 3DS, and the Classic line of retro consoles in 2018. He doesn't give away any surprises, but did go off script a bit to talk about his playthrough of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, and his fear of looking at how many hours he's logged into it.

Talk to me a little bit about your philosophy for the Nintendo Direct. Last year we saw some games that were kind of far out, holding the promise that a series was coming back. This year, it seems like, even with games in the hopper, you scaled back.

Broadly speaking, our focus at every E3 is driven by a handful of factors. One, we want to show games that are typically near in and our fans can look forward to purchasing relatively soon. Second, we always look at the total array of content, and decide what is the best thing to do – whether it’s a competition like we have this year, or some other key tactic. Every year is different, and every year is based on the content that is available.

Opinion – Stop Teasing Death Stranding And Show It Already

about X hours ago from
Opinion – Stop Teasing Death Stranding And Show It Already

Since it was announced over two years ago at E3 2016, Death Stranding has been an intriguing conversation piece. Every industry event provides another opportunity for Sony and Kojima Productions to showcase the game, and each cryptic trailer sends gamers into a frenzy as they try to find and decipher clues about the content. That approach may energize fans when a game is revealed, but we are too far beyond that with Death Stranding. The mystery isn’t interesting anymore; the lack of information is frustrating, and enough is enough. The next time I see Death Stranding, I want a clear picture of what players actually do in the game, and how.

Before I go any further, let me clarify that my complaint has nothing to do with my perception of Death Stranding’s quality. In fact, I love director Hideo Kojima’s Metal Gear series, so I already know I’m going to play this one. Because of that, I still want to be surprised; I’m not looking for huge story spoilers, or a deep dive into every weapon or enemy type. All I want is something – anything – concrete to be excited about. I want to know about gameplay, systems, goals, and progression. Just enough so that I can imagine what a session with Death Stranding might be like – but we haven’t crossed that threshold yet.

Opinion – Stop Teasing Death Stranding And Show It Already

about X hours ago from
Opinion – Stop Teasing Death Stranding And Show It Already

Since it was announced over two years ago at E3 2016, Death Stranding has been an intriguing conversation piece. Every industry event provides another opportunity for Sony and Kojima Productions to showcase the game, and each cryptic trailer sends gamers into a frenzy as they try to find and decipher clues about the content. That approach may energize fans when a game is revealed, but we are too far beyond that with Death Stranding. The mystery isn’t interesting anymore; the lack of information is frustrating, and enough is enough. The next time I see Death Stranding, I want a clear picture of what players actually do in the game, and how.

Before I go any further, let me clarify that my complaint has nothing to do with my perception of Death Stranding’s quality. In fact, I love director Hideo Kojima’s Metal Gear series, so I already know I’m going to play this one. Because of that, I still want to be surprised; I’m not looking for huge story spoilers, or a deep dive into every weapon or enemy type. All I want is something – anything – concrete to be excited about. I want to know about gameplay, systems, goals, and progression. Just enough so that I can imagine what a session with Death Stranding might be like – but we haven’t crossed that threshold yet.