Tales of Madness: The Lovecraftian Games On The Horizon

about X hours ago from
Tales of Madness: The Lovecraftian Games On The Horizon

I don't need to give H.P. Lovecraft much of an introduction. He's the man who added tentacles to horror, and gave creatures names no one can spell. His work, which dates back to the early 1900s has been an inspiration point for many game developers today.

Hit games like Dead Space and Bloodborne toy with Lovecraftian themes and imagery. Telltale signs of his work are characters going insane and seeing ghastly beings which can hardly be described. I've identified seven forthcoming titles that embrace these elements – some outright showing their Lovecraft influence in the title, others with it hidden in the story and world themes.

If you are a fan of stories that have characters teetering on the brink of insanity, here are seven games you should keep your eye on;

Tales of Madness: The Lovecraftian Games On The Horizon

about X hours ago from
Tales of Madness: The Lovecraftian Games On The Horizon

I don't need to give H.P. Lovecraft much of an introduction. He's the man who added tentacles to horror, and gave creatures names no one can spell. His work, which dates back to the early 1900s has been an inspiration point for many game developers today.

Hit games like Dead Space and Bloodborne toy with Lovecraftian themes and imagery. Telltale signs of his work are characters going insane and seeing ghastly beings which can hardly be described. I've identified seven forthcoming titles that embrace these elements – some outright showing their Lovecraft influence in the title, others with it hidden in the story and world themes.

If you are a fan of stories that have characters teetering on the brink of insanity, here are seven games you should keep your eye on;

From Valiant Hearts With Ubisoft To 11-11: Memories Retold With Aardman

about X hours ago from
From Valiant Hearts With Ubisoft To 11-11: Memories Retold With Aardman

After completing co-directing duties on Valiant Hearts: The Great War, Ubisoft made it clear to Yoan Fanise that moving forward, it would be focusing exclusively on triple-A titles. After his positive experience with Valiant Hearts, Fanise decided those were the kinds of projects he wanted to work on in the future, so he left to start his own studio, DigixArt to keep making smaller projects.

After releasing the mobile game, Lost in Harmony: Kaito's Adventure, Fanise had a chance encounter with animation studio Aardman, the creators of Wallace and Gromit, and began talks to collaborate with the studio on a game covering a topic he was very familiar with: World War I. We spoke with Fanise at E3 about how 11-11: Memories Retold came to exist, why Bandai Namco is publishing the game, how Aardman will make the game unique, and why Elijah Wood hates video game crates so much.

Game Informer: How did this game and the relationship with Aardman come about?

From Valiant Hearts With Ubisoft To 11-11: Memories Retold With Aardman

about X hours ago from
From Valiant Hearts With Ubisoft To 11-11: Memories Retold With Aardman

After completing co-directing duties on Valiant Hearts: The Great War, Ubisoft made it clear to Yoan Fanise that moving forward, it would be focusing exclusively on triple-A titles. After his positive experience with Valiant Hearts, Fanise decided those were the kinds of projects he wanted to work on in the future, so he left to start his own studio, DigixArt to keep making smaller projects.

After releasing the mobile game, Lost in Harmony: Kaito's Adventure, Fanise had a chance encounter with animation studio Aardman, the creators of Wallace and Gromit, and began talks to collaborate with the studio on a game covering a topic he was very familiar with: World War I. We spoke with Fanise at E3 about how 11-11: Memories Retold came to exist, why Bandai Namco is publishing the game, how Aardman will make the game unique, and why Elijah Wood hates video game crates so much.

Game Informer: How did this game and the relationship with Aardman come about?

Replay – Silent Hill 3

about X hours ago from
Replay – Silent Hill 3

Hide the children and the weak of heart! Silent Hill 3 may take place in an amusement park filled with pleasant things like a pink bunny mascot, but a closer look at it reveals blood on its mouth! Oh, the horror! In this episode of Replay, we explore this location, battle a bunch of dogs and dinosaurs, and learn more about ourselves along the way. This game holds up surprisingly well, and currently sits near the top of our list as a game we wouldn't mind Super Replaying in the future. If you second this motion, let us know in the comments section below.

Also, this is the final episode of Replay: Season 4! You are probably confused why we create seasons, and may think we're just making things up as we go. We use seasons as a way to review our work and determine where the show should go next. At the end of Season 3, we took a month-long break to create a new direction for the show. We won't be taking a break leading into Replay: Season 5. We'll be back next week with a slightly different look back at the games of yesteryear. And for those asking, the God Hand Super Replay is right around the corner. Buckle up. It's going to be a wild one.

Replay – Silent Hill 3

about X hours ago from
Replay – Silent Hill 3

Hide the children and the weak of heart! Silent Hill 3 may take place in an amusement park filled with pleasant things like a pink bunny mascot, but a closer look at it reveals blood on its mouth! Oh, the horror! In this episode of Replay, we explore this location, battle a bunch of dogs and dinosaurs, and learn more about ourselves along the way. This game holds up surprisingly well, and currently sits near the top of our list as a game we wouldn't mind Super Replaying in the future. If you second this motion, let us know in the comments section below.

Also, this is the final episode of Replay: Season 4! You are probably confused why we create seasons, and may think we're just making things up as we go. We use seasons as a way to review our work and determine where the show should go next. At the end of Season 3, we took a month-long break to create a new direction for the show. We won't be taking a break leading into Replay: Season 5. We'll be back next week with a slightly different look back at the games of yesteryear. And for those asking, the God Hand Super Replay is right around the corner. Buckle up. It's going to be a wild one.

UFC Heavyweight Champ Stipe Miocic Uses Fortnite And Call Of Duty To Unwind During Training Camp

about X hours ago from
UFC Heavyweight Champ Stipe Miocic Uses Fortnite And Call Of Duty To Unwind During Training Camp

As the heavyweight champion of the UFC, part-time firefighter paramedic, and expectant father, Stipe Miocic certainly keeps busy. However, even as he’s gearing up to defend his belt against light heavyweight champion Daniel Cormier in one of the biggest fights in UFC history, Miocic unwinds by playing and streaming games like Fortnite.

Miocic got introduced to Fortnite through friend and fellow UFC fighter Gian Villante and a Call of Duty group he plays regularly with. “We used to play Call of Duty together, then we went over to Fortnite, and now we’re going back to Call of Duty again,” he says. “We just kind of go back and forth.”

Fortnite has made headlines with athletes in the past, but often for the wrong reasons. In May, Boston Red Sox pitcher David Price had to cut himself off from playing Fortnite at the ballpark due to it affecting his performance and causing him to miss a start due to carpal tunnel syndrome.

UFC Heavyweight Champ Stipe Miocic Uses Fortnite And Call Of Duty To Unwind During Training Camp

about X hours ago from
UFC Heavyweight Champ Stipe Miocic Uses Fortnite And Call Of Duty To Unwind During Training Camp

As the heavyweight champion of the UFC, part-time firefighter paramedic, and expectant father, Stipe Miocic certainly keeps busy. However, even as he’s gearing up to defend his belt against light heavyweight champion Daniel Cormier in one of the biggest fights in UFC history, Miocic unwinds by playing and streaming games like Fortnite.

Miocic got introduced to Fortnite through friend and fellow UFC fighter Gian Villante and a Call of Duty group he plays regularly with. “We used to play Call of Duty together, then we went over to Fortnite, and now we’re going back to Call of Duty again,” he says. “We just kind of go back and forth.”

Fortnite has made headlines with athletes in the past, but often for the wrong reasons. In May, Boston Red Sox pitcher David Price had to cut himself off from playing Fortnite at the ballpark due to it affecting his performance and causing him to miss a start due to carpal tunnel syndrome.

10 Real-Life Activities I Only Enjoy In Video Games

about X hours ago from
10 Real-Life Activities I Only Enjoy In Video Games

Video games serve up all sorts of fantastical adventures, from battling giant monsters to dungeon delving for untold riches to sexing up aliens instead of saving the galaxy. However, video games can also make mundane activities entertaining – way more than their stupid real-life counterparts.

My recent misadventures in Houser Flipper once again reminded me of a strange and unsettling phenomenon – I sometimes spend countless hours doing the virtual simulations of activities that I try to avoid at all costs in real life. How messed up is that? And what does it say about our society and our modern lives? Would we feel happier and more fulfilled if we broke free from these cheap digital emulations and instead focused on the real activities that inspired them in the first place? If you’re seeking answers to those profound questions, go bug Javy – I’m just the guy who points out the dumb similarities.

Without further ado, here are 10 real-life activities I only enjoy in video games:

10 Real-Life Activities I Only Enjoy In Video Games

about X hours ago from
10 Real-Life Activities I Only Enjoy In Video Games

Video games serve up all sorts of fantastical adventures, from battling giant monsters to dungeon delving for untold riches to sexing up aliens instead of saving the galaxy. However, video games can also make mundane activities entertaining – way more than their stupid real-life counterparts.

My recent misadventures in Houser Flipper once again reminded me of a strange and unsettling phenomenon – I sometimes spend countless hours doing the virtual simulations of activities that I try to avoid at all costs in real life. How messed up is that? And what does it say about our society and our modern lives? Would we feel happier and more fulfilled if we broke free from these cheap digital emulations and instead focused on the real activities that inspired them in the first place? If you’re seeking answers to those profound questions, go bug Javy – I’m just the guy who points out the dumb similarities.

Without further ado, here are 10 real-life activities I only enjoy in video games: