Why Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Doesn't Have Online Multiplayer

about X hours ago from
Why Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Doesn't Have Online Multiplayer

After the initial reveal of Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, we quickly learned it would lack online multiplayer – a first for the developer’s major titles since Demon’s Souls. As part of our visit to the studio for our cover story, we asked them to elaborate on why that was the case.

Past From games have had an idiosyncratic take on online multiplayer. Players could leave each other notes throughout the world, warning each other of dangerous surprises or goading them into hazards. One player could summon another to help them with a difficult section, but risk being invaded and attacked by another.

From Software isn’t necessarily abandoning that part of its legacy, but it is taking a bit of a detour for now. “Of course, we at From, we love those online elements,” says Yasuhiro Kitao, manager of marketing and communications at From. “We love to create our own characters just as much as everyone else. We hope players are looking forward to something in the future where we might go back to that, but for now, Sekiro is very much its own thing.”

How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

about X hours ago from
How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

One of the ways Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice marks a departure for From Software is in how your character becomes stronger. In other From games, you tailor your character by pouring points into different stats like strength, dexterity, and intelligence, depending on whether you want to fight as a brute, archer, or wizard, respectively. Shadows Die Twice won’t have that breadth of customization, as your character, The Wolf, is a shinobi through and through. That doesn’t mean you can’t tailor him to fit your playstyle, though.

A major departure hardcore From fans may scoff at is the lack of corpse runs. Though you gain experience from defeating foes in Shadows Die Twice, that experience is now divorced from currency; gold now drops from enemies as well, and you won’t lose either when you die. If you’re afraid that change might upset the balance of tension and accomplishment that have come define From games, there’s hope: Director Hidetaka Miyazaki says death will have a detrimental effect, but wasn’t willing to tell us what that might be.

How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

about X hours ago from
How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

One of the ways Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice marks a departure for From Software is in how your character becomes stronger. In other From games, you tailor your character by pouring points into different stats like strength, dexterity, and intelligence, depending on whether you want to fight as a brute, archer, or wizard, respectively. Shadows Die Twice won’t have that breadth of customization, as your character, The Wolf, is a shinobi through and through. That doesn’t mean you can’t tailor him to fit your playstyle, though.

A major departure hardcore From fans may scoff at is the lack of corpse runs. Though you gain experience from defeating foes in Shadows Die Twice, that experience is now divorced from currency; gold now drops from enemies as well, and you won’t lose either when you die. If you’re afraid that change might upset the balance of tension and accomplishment that have come define From games, there’s hope: Director Hidetaka Miyazaki says death will have a detrimental effect, but wasn’t willing to tell us what that might be.

How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

about X hours ago from
How Character Progression Works In Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

One of the ways Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice marks a departure for From Software is in how your character becomes stronger. In other From games, you tailor your character by pouring points into different stats like strength, dexterity, and intelligence, depending on whether you want to fight as a brute, archer, or wizard, respectively. Shadows Die Twice won’t have that breadth of customization, as your character, The Wolf, is a shinobi through and through. That doesn’t mean you can’t tailor him to fit your playstyle, though.

A major departure hardcore From fans may scoff at is the lack of corpse runs. Though you gain experience from defeating foes in Shadows Die Twice, that experience is now divorced from currency; gold now drops from enemies as well, and you won’t lose either when you die. If you’re afraid that change might upset the balance of tension and accomplishment that have come define From games, there’s hope: Director Hidetaka Miyazaki says death will have a detrimental effect, but wasn’t willing to tell us what that might be.

February Cover Revealed - Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

about X hours ago from
February Cover Revealed - Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

From Software has been around forever, but is best known for its suite of action RPG games beginning with Demon's Souls. Between Dark Souls titles and Bloodborne, From has explored atmospheric dark fantasy and cosmic horror, and now they head to feudal Japan for Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice. We spent over two hours with the game in Tokyo and picked From Software president Hidetaka Miyazaki's mind to get all the details on the upcoming game, from progression systems to traversal. Check out the cover for the February issue of Game Informer!

Join us to discover what makes Sekiro different from From's suite of existing games as well as why fans of Souls games have a lot to look forward to. The February issue doesn't stop there, and is dedicated to the top games of 2018, including our expansive top 50 list, game of the year award, and our top picks for each category. You'll also find our choices for top dorks, characters, publishers, and more, including an interview with the director of the 1994 Double Dragon movie!

February Cover Revealed - Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

about X hours ago from
February Cover Revealed - Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

From Software has been around forever, but is best known for its suite of action RPG games beginning with Demon's Souls. Between Dark Souls titles and Bloodborne, From has explored atmospheric dark fantasy and cosmic horror, and now they head to feudal Japan for Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice. We spent over two hours with the game in Tokyo and picked From Software president Hidetaka Miyazaki's mind to get all the details on the upcoming game, from progression systems to traversal. Check out the cover for the February issue of Game Informer!

Join us to discover what makes Sekiro different from From's suite of existing games as well as why fans of Souls games have a lot to look forward to. The February issue doesn't stop there, and is dedicated to the top games of 2018, including our expansive top 50 list, game of the year award, and our top picks for each category. You'll also find our choices for top dorks, characters, publishers, and more, including an interview with the director of the 1994 Double Dragon movie!

Why Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Doesn't Have Online Multiplayer

about X hours ago from
Why Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Doesn't Have Online Multiplayer

After the initial reveal of Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, we quickly learned it would lack online multiplayer – a first for the developer’s major titles since Demon’s Souls. As part of our visit to the studio for our cover story, we asked them to elaborate on why that was the case.

Past From games have had an idiosyncratic take on online multiplayer. Players could leave each other notes throughout the world, warning each other of dangerous surprises or goading them into hazards. One player could summon another to help them with a difficult section, but risk being invaded and attacked by another.

From Software isn’t necessarily abandoning that part of its legacy, but it is taking a bit of a detour for now. “Of course, we at From, we love those online elements,” says Yasuhiro Kitao, manager of marketing and communications at From. “We love to create our own characters just as much as everyone else. We hope players are looking forward to something in the future where we might go back to that, but for now, Sekiro is very much its own thing.”

2019 Video Game Release Schedule

about X hours ago from
2019 Video Game Release Schedule

If you're wondering what games are coming up in 2019, we've put them all in one convenient location. This list will be continually updated to act as a living, breathing schedule as new dates are announced, titles are delayed, and big reveals happen. This should help you plan out your next several months in gaming and beyond.

New additions or changes to the list will be in bold.

As the gaming calendar is constantly changing, we highly recommend you bookmark this page. You'll likely find yourself coming back to this to find out the most recent release schedule for the most anticipated games across PC, consoles, handhelds, and mobile devices. If you notice that we've missed something, feel free to let us know! Please note that games will not get assigned to a month until they have confirmed release dates.

2019 Video Game Release Schedule

about X hours ago from
2019 Video Game Release Schedule

If you're wondering what games are coming up in 2019, we've put them all in one convenient location. This list will be continually updated to act as a living, breathing schedule as new dates are announced, titles are delayed, and big reveals happen. This should help you plan out your next several months in gaming and beyond.

New additions or changes to the list will be in bold.

As the gaming calendar is constantly changing, we highly recommend you bookmark this page. You'll likely find yourself coming back to this to find out the most recent release schedule for the most anticipated games across PC, consoles, handhelds, and mobile devices. If you notice that we've missed something, feel free to let us know! Please note that games will not get assigned to a month until they have confirmed release dates.

Building The Future By Fixing The Past

about X hours ago from
Building The Future By Fixing The Past

A few weeks ago I recorded a Sports Desk video with colleagues Matt Bertz and Brian Shea reviewing 2018. Unfortunately, the more we talked, the more pessimistic I became about where we are with many sports series. Games are shipping with more and more bugs, the online experience is still unpredictable for many, and legacy issues define some titles more than the actual advancements for the year. We’re in what should be the sweet spot for games in terms of where we are in this generation of home consoles, but it feels like many sports titles are stuck in the mud.

What can we do to get back on track? Perhaps studios should consider the unthinkable: Prioritize fixing existing gameplay and features over creating new ones. Will this happen? Absolutely not. It would be the equivalent of committing suicide for companies’ marketing departments who have to continually drum up interest for these yearly iterations by leaning on  new promises. But perhaps in the quest of growing an active player base the best thing publishers and developers can do is keeping existing players from leaving by fixing legacy issues and ensuring the game works as advertised in the first place.