How Two Developers Made A Living With Awful Games

about X hours ago from
How Two Developers Made A Living With Awful Games

Mobile games were supposed to be an indie developer nirvana. When the iPhone debuted in 2007, Apple pitched consumers on the promise of an endless stream of tiny creative games and other productivity applications. Indie developers immediately recognized the market’s potential: A small team of developers could release their experimental projects to millions of users at a low price and reap large rewards. Early mobile hits like Words with Friends, Fruit Ninja, and Temple Run seemed to confirm this notion, and those titles helped their developers amass significant nest eggs.

Then the gold rush happened, and the mobile market metastasized into something ugly. App stores overflowed with ad-driven, free-to-play games that catered to the lowest common denominator. Mobile game development became financially unsustainable for many. In the midst of this mobile “indiepocalypse,” two friends found success in an unlikely place. Their secret: Make a thousand bad games.

In 2013, Alex Schwartz and Ziba Scott joined a shared workspace co-op in Boston while independently pursuing careers in game development. Both designers had shifted to the mobile space with the dream of making their big break in the industry. After their first meeting, they quickly bonded over the struggle to realize that dream.

How Two Developers Made A Living With Awful Games

about X hours ago from
How Two Developers Made A Living With Awful Games

Mobile games were supposed to be an indie developer nirvana. When the iPhone debuted in 2007, Apple pitched consumers on the promise of an endless stream of tiny creative games and other productivity applications. Indie developers immediately recognized the market’s potential: A small team of developers could release their experimental projects to millions of users at a low price and reap large rewards. Early mobile hits like Words with Friends, Fruit Ninja, and Temple Run seemed to confirm this notion, and those titles helped their developers amass significant nest eggs.

Then the gold rush happened, and the mobile market metastasized into something ugly. App stores overflowed with ad-driven, free-to-play games that catered to the lowest common denominator. Mobile game development became financially unsustainable for many. In the midst of this mobile “indiepocalypse,” two friends found success in an unlikely place. Their secret: Make a thousand bad games.

In 2013, Alex Schwartz and Ziba Scott joined a shared workspace co-op in Boston while independently pursuing careers in game development. Both designers had shifted to the mobile space with the dream of making their big break in the industry. After their first meeting, they quickly bonded over the struggle to realize that dream.

Replay – The X-Files

about X hours ago from
Replay – The X-Files

Set roughly during the third season of The X-Files show, the 1998 PlayStation game of the same name follows FBI agent Craig Willmore as he tries to track down Fox Mulder and Dana Scully. This point-and-click adventure uses a full-motion-video technology called Virtual Cinema, which offers up a number of choices called ... wait for it ... UberVariables.

The Game Informer crew is playing through the opening moments of this forgotten gem and will do their best to not butcher X-Files legacy in the process. Enjoy the episode, and we'll see you again live in seven days!

Replay – The X-Files

about X hours ago from
Replay – The X-Files

Set roughly during the third season of The X-Files show, the 1998 PlayStation game of the same name follows FBI agent Craig Willmore as he tries to track down Fox Mulder and Dana Scully. This point-and-click adventure uses a full-motion-video technology called Virtual Cinema, which offers up a number of choices called ... wait for it ... UberVariables.

The Game Informer crew is playing through the opening moments of this forgotten gem and will do their best to not butch X-Files legacy in the process. Enjoy the episode, and we'll see you again live in seven days!

Exclusive Pokémon Sword And Shield Concept Art Gallery

about X hours ago from
Exclusive Pokémon Sword And Shield Concept Art Gallery

As you probably already know, our cover story this month features Pokémon Sword and Shield. As part of our coverage, we received a glimpse of concept art from the early days of development. Now, you can get a look at these never-before-seen pieces of concept art. These pieces were illustrated by director Shigeru Ohmori, art director James Turner, and managing director/art director at Game Freak Ken Sugimori, who has been a character designer and artist for the series since the first entries.

You can see the full gallery, as well as descriptions provided by Game Freak, below.

This was drawn by James Turner, the art director, as an example of the final art direction he wanted to pursue for Pokémon Sword & Shield. We then developed 3D models of the same environment to try to match the look.

Exclusive Pokémon Sword And Shield Concept Art Gallery

about X hours ago from
Exclusive Pokémon Sword And Shield Concept Art Gallery

As you probably already know, our cover story this month features Pokémon Sword and Shield. As part of our coverage, we received a glimpse of concept art from the early days of development. Now, you can get a look at these never-before-seen pieces of concept art. These pieces were illustrated by director Shigeru Ohmori, art director James Turner, and managing director/art director at Game Freak Ken Sugimori, who has been a character designer and artist for the series since the first entries.

You can see the full gallery, as well as descriptions provided by Game Freak, below.

This was drawn by James Turner, the art director, as an example of the final art direction he wanted to pursue for Pokémon Sword & Shield. We then developed 3D models of the same environment to try to match the look.

Pokémon Sword And Shield Have Mechanics To Let You Use Your Favorite Pokémon Competitively

about X hours ago from
Pokémon Sword And Shield Have Mechanics To Let You Use Your Favorite Pokémon Competitively

The latest entries in the Pokémon series are making several tweaks to the franchise's long-running conventions. From introducing autosave to getting rid of the Exp. Share item in favor of an automatic solution, Sword and Shield change several things about the standard play of a Pokémon game. While Game Freak was open about a lot of the behind-the-scenes information surrounding the development of Pokémon Sword and Shield, the team was a bit cagier about a new battle mechanic it could only tease.

Pokémon Sword And Shield Have Mechanics To Let You Use Your Favorite Pokémon Competitively

about X hours ago from
Pokémon Sword And Shield Have Mechanics To Let You Use Your Favorite Pokémon Competitively

The latest entries in the Pokémon series are making several tweaks to the franchise's long-running conventions. From introducing autosave to getting rid of the Exp. Share item in favor of an automatic solution, Sword and Shield change several things about the standard play of a Pokémon game. While Game Freak was open about a lot of the behind-the-scenes information surrounding the development of Pokémon Sword and Shield, the team was a bit cagier about a new battle mechanic it could only tease.

Pokémon Cut From Sword And Shield's National Pokédex Will Return In The Future

about X hours ago from
Pokémon Cut From Sword And Shield's National Pokédex Will Return In The Future

Fans are eagerly anticipating Pokémon Sword and Shield, but some of the biggest news coming out of summer was regarding what won't be in the first mainline Pokémon console RPGs. During E3, producer Junichi Masuda explained that not every Pokémon will make the leap into Sword and Shield. This news left many fans disappointed, so I caught up with Masuda during our trip for this month's cover story to dive deeper into the reasoning for the cuts.

According to Masuda, the sheer number of Pokémon the series had accumulated over the last two-plus decades got to the point of being unwieldy. "Up until now, we’ve been proud we’ve been able to include so many Pokémon in the games, but as a result of that, there’s actually been quite a few features or gameplay ideas that we’ve had to abandon in the past," he says. "Going forward, thinking about the future of Pokémon, we want to prioritize all those new gameplay ideas, new ways to enjoy the game, and want to challenge ourselves at Game Freak to create new ways to enjoy the game. That’s really what drove the decision for this new direction."

Pokémon Cut From Sword And Shield's National Pokédex Will Return In The Future

about X hours ago from
Pokémon Cut From Sword And Shield's National Pokédex Will Return In The Future

Fans are eagerly anticipating Pokémon Sword and Shield, but some of the biggest news coming out of summer was regarding what won't be in the first mainline Pokémon console RPGs. During E3, producer Junichi Masuda explained that not every Pokémon will make the leap into Sword and Shield. This news left many fans disappointed, so I caught up with Masuda during our trip for this month's cover story to dive deeper into the reasoning for the cuts.

According to Masuda, the sheer number of Pokémon the series had accumulated over the last two-plus decades got to the point of being unwieldy. "Up until now, we’ve been proud we’ve been able to include so many Pokémon in the games, but as a result of that, there’s actually been quite a few features or gameplay ideas that we’ve had to abandon in the past," he says. "Going forward, thinking about the future of Pokémon, we want to prioritize all those new gameplay ideas, new ways to enjoy the game, and want to challenge ourselves at Game Freak to create new ways to enjoy the game. That’s really what drove the decision for this new direction."