23 Tips To Help You Dominate Into The Breach

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23 Tips To Help You Dominate Into The Breach

Subset Games' Into The Breach is more immediately understandable and accessible than the studio's previous game, FTL, but dig deeper and there's a lot to wrap your head around before achieving mastery. Luckily we're here to help you fend off the ferocious kaiju assaults with some handy tips we've learned during our own battles.

1. Start on easy – get a feel for the game and start getting some unlocks on easy before moving up to normal.

2. Use the environment, including the enemies. If there’s any single tip that you should be thinking about all the time, this is it. Success in Into the Breach demands smart use of everything on the grid. Push enemies into each other or into mountains (and other obstacles) to damage them. Move them into positions where their line of fire won’t cause damage. Hide your artillery units behind obstacles to keep their health up. Push and pull bad guys into water, fire, smoke, and acid. And like in Chess, controlling the center of the board is often key to controlling the entire map.

The Sports Desk – The Fighters UFC 3 Needs To Add

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The Sports Desk – The Fighters UFC 3 Needs To Add

This week my esteemed colleague Brian Shea is here to dive more in-depth with the UFC 3 roster, analyzing its relevance and how it can improve going forward.

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EA Sports UFC 3 launched earlier and, as I said in my review, it is a terrific MMA game. The new career mode adds depth to the single-player suite, while the other modes – both online and offline – make strides to improve the experience. EA Vancouver made a strong effort to include as many top-ranked and popular fighters from the current UFC landscape as possible, but it isn't feasible to include every fighter – especially not at launch.

Check Out Some Photos Of The New Charizard Pokémon Gallery Figure DX

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Check Out Some Photos Of The New Charizard Pokémon Gallery Figure DX

Last year, Pokémon Center started a new line of Pokémon collectibles called Gallery Figures. The initial line featured Pikachu, Mew, Eevee, and Magikarp, while the second line contained Cubone, Vulpix, Psyduck, and Jigglypuff. Since then, the lines have been smaller, with a third wave featuring only Espeon and Umbreon, and a fourth wave starring the three starters from Sun and Moon: Rowlet, Popplio, and Litten. This next wave is the smallest yet in terms of number of figures, but the sole member of this fifth wave is far from small.

One of the most popular Pokémon, Charizard, finally joins the Pokémon Gallery Figure line. Not only that, but as the first ever DX figure, he is substantially larger than any other Gallery Figure. As with all collectibles in the line, Charizard is performing a signature move: blast burn. The figure launches on February 27 at PokémonCenter.com and retails for $28.99 while supplies last.

Check out the gallery below, and if you want to see the first three waves of figures, check out the links below.

How The 4A Engine Is Evolving For Metro Exodus

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How The 4A Engine Is Evolving For Metro Exodus

Since its debut with Metro 2033  in 2010, 4A's in-house engine has proven to be a powerful piece of evolving software. Metro: Last Light launched five years ago, and many publications, us included, use that game as a benchmark test for new gaming PCs. Despite its dark setting, Metro has always boasted beautiful visuals and memorable effects, like water droplets collecting on Artyom's gas mask and impressive shadow effects as a lamp swings in the darkness. However, with Exodus moving into new environments and embracing new gameplay styles, 4A had to overhaul its engine to meet the team's ambitions.

Exodus' version of the engine includes physics-based rendering, an overhauled lighting systems, as well as full-facial capture for cinematic sequences. Given Exodus' focus on its sandbox spaces, this engine also has to account for day and night cycles, dynamic weather, and simulated biomes for the inhabitants of each sandbox. Like everything else about Exodus, the graphics engine itself is an upgrade in ambition.

"Hopefully we're able to keep the Metro games as a standard for everyone's benchmarking needs," says executive producer Jon Bloch says, smiling. "We love blowing up video cards."

New Gameplay Today – Into The Breach

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New Gameplay Today – Into The Breach

Subset Games made a name for itself with its first game, FTL: Faster Than Light. Its latest release, Into the Breach, proves that it wasn't a fluke. Matt Miller has been playing – and enjoying – the strategy game, which pits squads of mechs against kaiju-like monsters. Check out what he has to say in our latest episode of NGT.

As Miller explains at length, there's a lot of depth in Into the Breach that might not be immediately apparent. Fortunately, he's been able to play through the game multiple times and can articulate just some of its nuances to me and Leo. Don't worry, however. This is a game that involves huge robots slamming giant monsters into buildings, pushing them into the ocean, and generally ruining their monster lives. 

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Super Replay – Vampire Hunter D Finale

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Super Replay – Vampire Hunter D Finale

Our playthrough of Sonic the Hedgehog 2006 is the most successful Super Replay to date. One thing became abundantly clear: You love watching us suffer while playing broken games. From the comments I read, a good number of you expected we would play another Sonic game for the annual 12.31 Super Replay. As tempting as that idea was, we decided to flip the script again, and do something completely different. Playing a survival horror game without Tim Turi still feels wrong. Playing another Sonic game just feels wrong, period. So we decided to turn our sights on the anime crowd, a pocket of loyal fans Replay hasn't mocked enough.

The one game that bubbled to the surface was Vampire Hunter D, a little-known PlayStation relic that launched on September 25, 2000. Developed by Victor Interactive Software and published by Jaleco, Vampire Hunter D is a game about a powerful talking hand that is attached to a vampire. I don't want to give away much more than that. The only other thing I will say is, we're having a terrible good time playing it. As always, we hope you enjoy this year's pick. It's unexpected, I know, but that's how these 12.31 Super Replays should be.

Episode 9(Please visit the site to view this media) 

Replay – Felony 11-79

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Replay – Felony 11-79

Felony 11-79 isn't an instantly recognizable title, but it lead to an excellent episode of Replay, we promise.

Speaking from my own perspective, this is my favorite type of Replay episode. I went in knowing nothing, and left with some newfound appreciation for a game I had previously never heard of. Join me, Andrew Reiner, and Dan Tack as we go on this experience together. We also take a look at two other games, one of which has a highly recognizable name that I had, similarly, never played for some weird reason.

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Top Of The Table – The Best Dungeons & Dragons Games (That Aren’t RPGs)

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Top Of The Table – The Best Dungeons & Dragons Games (That Aren’t RPGs)

Since 1974, players have been gathering around tables to live out adventures in the many worlds of the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. Across multiple editions of the game, players and DMs craft emergent stories and live out the lives of heroes and their adventures. D&D spawned an entire medium of other tabletop role-playing games, but the franchise has also spread into other arenas of tabletop play. 

This week, we’re taking a look at some of the great Dungeons & Dragons board, card, and miniatures games. Tapping into the campaign settings, concepts, and flavor of the brand, these games nonetheless aren’t role-playing games. Rather, they offer fascinating twists on the familiar fiction, sometimes emulating the feeling of a classic dungeon crawl but without the need for a DM, and at other times exploring entirely different genres of play, like worker placement or deck-building. 

If you’re a big fan of Dungeons & Dragons, or even if you’ve always been intrigued with that universe but have never felt ready to confront the complexity of the role-playing game, these are releases worth checking out. 

Alicia Vikander On Reinventing The Role Of Lara Croft

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Alicia Vikander On Reinventing The Role Of Lara Croft

Alicia Vikander stars as Lara Croft in the newest cinematic adaptation of the Tomb Raider series. Following in the footsteps of Angelina Jolie in the early 2000s movies, Vikander is assuming the role of a very different kind of Lara Croft based on the more recent Tomb Raider titles. More survivalist than action hero, Vikander's Croft is more at home with a bow and arrow than dual pistols. We got a chance to sit down with her ahead of the movie's March release and talk about the long history of the character.

How did you feel about getting the Lara Croft role? Have you played the games before?