Trade Secrets: The Making Of A Pokémon Card

about X hours ago from
Trade Secrets: The Making Of A Pokémon Card

Since 1996, the Pokémon Trading Card Game (TCG) has exceeded all expectations. It rode the fever pitch of the Pokémon craze that swept the world in the late ’90s, selling millions of packs around the world. Parents feared their children would lose themselves (and their own money) to the game, retailers were constantly selling out their stock, and schools banned the cards from their classrooms.

But the card game, much like Pokémon itself, has proved more than a passing fad. As of March, nearly 24 billion cards have been sold worldwide in over 11 languages across 74 countries and regions. This year’s Pokémon World Championships offers over $500,000 in prizes. With 80 sets released in the United States and more releasing at a steady clip, it’s clear the TCG holds a large claim to the Pokémon pie, and shows no signs of slowing down.

To see how these extremely popular cards are made, The Pokémon Company recently offered us a rare look at how Creatures, the studio in charge of maintaining the TCG, designs, draws, tests, and releases new additions to one of the world’s most popular card games.

Trade Secrets: The Making Of A Pokémon Card

about X hours ago from
Trade Secrets: The Making Of A Pokémon Card

Since 1996, the Pokémon Trading Card Game (TCG) has exceeded all expectations. It rode the fever pitch of the Pokémon craze that swept the world in the late ’90s, selling millions of packs around the world. Parents feared their children would lose themselves (and their own money) to the game, retailers were constantly selling out their stock, and schools banned the cards from their classrooms.

But the card game, much like Pokémon itself, has proved more than a passing fad. As of March, nearly 26 billion cards have been sold worldwide in over 11 languages across 74 countries and regions. This year’s Pokémon World Championships offers over $500,000 in prizes. With 80 sets released in the United States and more releasing at a steady clip, it’s clear the TCG holds a large claim to the Pokémon pie, and shows no signs of slowing down.

To see how these extremely popular cards are made, The Pokémon Company recently offered us a rare look at how Creatures, the studio in charge of maintaining the TCG, designs, draws, tests, and releases new additions to one of the world’s most popular card games.

Here Are The Best Photo Mode Pictures Of Spider-Man

about X hours ago from
Here Are The Best Photo Mode Pictures Of Spider-Man

Insomniac's Spider-Man launched yesterday, which means players have had a whole day to screw around with game's photo mode. We asked our community to send us their best shots of the web-crawler, and they did not disappoint. Check out these amazing photos J. Jonah Jameson would love to get his hands on.

For more Spider-Man, check out our review, upcoming Game Club, tips, and the stories behind all of the unlockable suits

Here Are The Best Photo Mode Pictures Of Spider-Man

about X hours ago from
Here Are The Best Photo Mode Pictures Of Spider-Man

Insomniac's Spider-Man launched yesterday, which means players have had a whole day to screw around with game's photo mode. We asked our community to send us their best shots of the web-crawler, and they did not disappoint. Check out these amazing photos J. Jonah Jameson would love to get his hands on.

For more Spider-Man, check out our review, upcoming Game Club, tips, and the stories behind all of the unlockable suits

Crafting Chaos: How Treyarch Is Building A Battle Royale Map

about X hours ago from
Crafting Chaos: How Treyarch Is Building A Battle Royale Map

During our trip to Treyarch, one thing became very clear: the studio is very conscious of its fanbase. From establishing lore over the years in its zombie modes (which we’ll talk about more later in the month) to how the studio is designing its take on battle royale, Treyarch’s motto is that it’s for the fans. You can see this in how Blackout is designed: an almost theme park-like setup dedicated to celebrating the series history that also happens to be a battle royale map. Fans of the series will find versions of older maps, like Firing Range and Nuketown, as locations on the map to investigate for loot and go head-to-head with other players. These locations have obviously been expanded and remixed since their original conception for Blackout, which is something Treyarch is excited to watch players discover for themselves.

Crafting Chaos: How Treyarch Is Building A Battle Royale Map

about X hours ago from
Crafting Chaos: How Treyarch Is Building A Battle Royale Map

During our trip to Treyarch, one thing became very clear: the studio is very conscious of its fanbase. From establishing lore over the years in its zombie modes (which we’ll talk about more later in the month) to how the studio is designing its take on battle royale, Treyarch’s motto is that it’s for the fans. You can see this in how Blackout is designed: an almost theme park-like setup dedicated to celebrating the series history that also happens to be a battle royale map. Fans of the series will find versions of older maps, like Firing Range and Nuketown, as locations on the map to investigate for loot and go head-to-head with other players. These locations have obviously been expanded and remixed since their original conception for Blackout, which is something Treyarch is excited to watch players discover for themselves.

Replay – Spider-Man: Web Of Shadows

about X hours ago from
Replay – Spider-Man: Web Of Shadows

Many of you are playing a great Spider-Man game right now. Why not take a break from that web-swinging action to check out a bad one? In this week's Replay, we dive deep into Spider-Man: Web of Shadows, a 2008 Activision title that showed Peter Parker in his prime, who was having issues with Mary Jane...and...sound familiar? Some of the story set up is similar to Insomniac's new release, but you'll quickly see the gameplay goes in a completely different direction, and couldn't be much more of a mess.

We dedicate the entire episode to Web of Shadows, mostly because we wanted to see a story development through to the end. We laughed and cried plenty in this episode. Enjoy the show, and we'll be back with another in just seven days!

Replay – Spider-Man: Web Of Shadows

about X hours ago from
Replay – Spider-Man: Web Of Shadows

Many of you are playing a great Spider-Man game right now. Why not take a break from that web-swinging action to check out a bad one? In this week's Replay, we dive deep into Spider-Man: Web of Shadows, a 2008 Activision title that showed Peter Parker in his prime, who was having issues with Mary Jane...and...sound familiar? Some of the story set up is similar to Insomniac's new release, but you'll quickly see the gameplay goes in a completely different direction, and couldn't be much more of a mess.

We dedicate the entire episode to Web of Shadows, mostly because we wanted to see a story development through to the end. We laughed and cried plenty in this episode. Enjoy the show, and we'll be back with another in just seven days!

The Mind – A Cooperative Game That Doesn’t Allow Cooperation

about X hours ago from
The Mind – A Cooperative Game That Doesn’t Allow Cooperation

After years filled with playing a lot of games, the appeal of novelty in design becomes increasingly compelling. That’s why I’m fascinated by The Mind, the new game published here in North America by Pandasaurus, which challenges players to work together, but without any of the methods of coordination or cooperation that normally allow for successful completion of a project. The sensation of play is at first eerie, and often makes people scoff as it is described, and yet somehow it works. It’s an experience quite unlike any game I’ve played.

The Mind has very straightforward rules. A deck of cards is numbered between 1 and 100, and players are dealt cards equal to the current level of play. At level 1, you get one card, and at level 2 you get two cards, and so on. Players may not reveal their card(s). To win the level, players must play the card face-up onto the table, in ascending order.

Here’s the catch: You can’t signal in any way to the other players. No speaking, no hand signals, no eye blinking, no subtle smiles. If you have the “23” card, you must somehow know to play the card before your friend who has the “47” card. If everyone plays all their cards in the correct order, the level is won, and the process is repeated with more cards.

The Mind – A Cooperative Game That Doesn’t Allow Cooperation

about X hours ago from
The Mind – A Cooperative Game That Doesn’t Allow Cooperation

After years filled with playing a lot of games, the appeal of novelty in design becomes increasingly compelling. That’s why I’m fascinated by The Mind, the new game published here in North America by Pandasaurus, which challenges players to work together, but without any of the methods of coordination or cooperation that normally allow for successful completion of a project. The sensation of play is at first eerie, and often makes people scoff as it is described, and yet somehow it works. It’s an experience quite unlike any game I’ve played.

The Mind has very straightforward rules. A deck of cards is numbered between 1 and 100, and players are dealt cards equal to the current level of play. At level 1, you get one card, and at level 2 you get two cards, and so on. Players may not reveal their card(s). To win the level, players must play the card face-up onto the table, in ascending order.

Here’s the catch: You can’t signal in any way to the other players. No speaking, no hand signals, no eye blinking, no subtle smiles. If you have the “23” card, you must somehow know to play the card before your friend who has the “47” card. If everyone plays all their cards in the correct order, the level is won, and the process is repeated with more cards.