Monster Hunter World: Iceborne Devs On Difficulty

about X hours ago from
Monster Hunter World: Iceborne Devs On Difficulty

Before you can jump into Monster Hunter World: Iceborne’s new story content, you’ll need to have already completed the base game’s campaign. At first glance, that seems as though it would make balancing the game’s difficulty a little easier, since hunters who make it to the frozen wilds have some experience under their belts. After talking with the team during our cover-story trip, we gained a deeper appreciation for how challenging it can be finding the right difficulty balance.

Even though Iceborne’s hunters have some shared experience, it turns out not all veteran hunters are the same – and that means that some will face some growing pains when facing off against the tougher new master-rank monsters. 

“I think for players who are going straight from the end of the story from World it’s going to feel a little more difficult when they’re transitioning into the new master rank for Iceborne,” says Kaname Fujioka, Iceborne’s executive director and art director. “If it’s players who have been going in-depth into the content for Monster Hunter World and the updates, then they’ll feel a much smoother transition for difficulty than other players will.”

Here Are The Horror Movies Supermassive's Developers Think You Should Watch

about X hours ago from
Here Are The Horror Movies Supermassive's Developers Think You Should Watch

We recently got a chance to sit down with Supermassive's managing director Pete Samuels and head of marketing James Scalpello to talk a bit about Man of Medan. During the interview, I asked them a bit about their plans for future games, and the two said they were big fans of horror and had 39 sub-genres to choose from for their games. Obviously, to make a horror anthology, you have to be big fans of horror, so I inquired what their recommendations are for horror movies people should watch.

Samuels stopped to consider it a bit, but Scalpello was quick to answer.

"My recommendation is just is an old horror movie, because it's the thing that scares me most. And there are a lot that don't scare me, but for me it's The Shining. I mean, it's nothing new or, you know, innovative in terms of new cinema or something. But for me, The Shining is all would always get me. If I was at home, and the wife and children were out and The Shining's on, I would be watching it. And that's generally the only horror film that kind of gets me, the psychological stuff."

Here Are The Horror Movies Supermassive's Developers Think You Should Watch

about X hours ago from
Here Are The Horror Movies Supermassive's Developers Think You Should Watch

We recently got a chance to sit down with Supermassive's managing director Pete Samuels and head of marketing James Scalpello to talk a bit about Man of Medan. During the interview, I asked them a bit about their plans for future games, and the two said they were big fans of horror and had 39 sub-genres to choose from for their games. Obviously, to make a horror anthology, you have to be big fans of horror, so I inquired what their recommendations are for horror movies people should watch.

Samuels stopped to consider it a bit, but Scalpello was quick to answer.

"My recommendation is just is an old horror movie, because it's the thing that scares me most. And there are a lot that don't scare me, but for me it's The Shining. I mean, it's nothing new or, you know, innovative in terms of new cinema or something. But for me, The Shining is all would always get me. If I was at home, and the wife and children were out and The Shining's on, I would be watching it. And that's generally the only horror film that kind of gets me, the psychological stuff."

The Joys Of A Super Education

about X hours ago from
The Joys Of A Super Education

I didn't have a Super Nintendo as a kid. I grew up in a Sega household playing Mortal Kombat 3, Streets of Rage, Ecco the Dolphin, and even Sonic, as this piece of regrettable evidence proves:

Wow. That's a yikes and a half. Anyway: the point here is that I never got around to playing some of the biggest games the 16-bit generation since I didn't own a Nintendo console until the Nintendo 64. The only time I ever actually got to play the SNES was in the occasional hotel that, for some reason or another, had an emulator built into the TV where you could play Zelda, F-Zero, and Super Mario RPG for 10 bucks an hour. For the past 15 years, I've been telling myself that I'd get around to playing some of those classics I missed out on to completion but have been putting off multiple opportunities to do so, including Nintendo literally re-releasing a greatest hits version of the console!

When June arrived and game's release schedule slowed down in the wake of E3, I took the opportunity to purchase a new 3DS, download some Virtual Console SNES games, and leap into a past I never got to experience as a kid. I expected most of these games to be sort of difficult to get through, akin to reading something dry but important like The Grapes Of Wrath to understand its literary significance, instead of genuinely fun experiences that stand the test of time.

The Joys Of A Super Education

about X hours ago from
The Joys Of A Super Education

I didn't have a Super Nintendo as a kid. I grew up in a Sega household playing Mortal Kombat 3, Streets of Rage, Ecco the Dolphin, and even Sonic, as this piece of regrettable evidence proves:

Wow. That's a yikes and a half. Anyway: the point here is that I never got around to playing some of the biggest games the 16-bit generation since I didn't own a Nintendo console until the Nintendo 64. The only time I ever actually got to play the SNES was in the occasional hotel that, for some reason or another, had an emulator built into the TV where you could play Zelda, F-Zero, and Super Mario RPG for 10 bucks an hour. For the past 15 years, I've been telling myself that I'd get around to playing some of those classics I missed out on to completion but have been putting off multiple opportunities to do so, including Nintendo literally re-releasing a greatest hits version of the console!

When June arrived and gaming's release schedule slowed down in the wake of E3, I took the opportunity to purchase a new 3DS, download some Virtual Console SNES games, and leap into a past I never got to experience as a kid. I expected most of these games to be sort of difficult to get through, akin to reading something dry but important like The Grapes Of Wrath to understand its literary significance, instead of genuinely fun experiences that stand the test of time.

Four Questions To Consider When Buying Cross-Gen Games

about X hours ago from
Four Questions To Consider When Buying Cross-Gen Games

With Microsoft’s Project Scarlett and the PlayStation 5 likely to release next year, we’re set to enter another era of cross-gen games. It’s that awkward time where old consoles are pushed to their limits, and the new hotness won’t likely reach its full potential for a few years. Developers will eventually stop support for the PS4 and Xbox One, but until that happens, here are some good questions to consider before deciding if the last-gen game will do the trick, or if you’re better off waiting to play it on the new hardware.

We recognize that more advanced consoles can run more advanced games, but do your research to make sure you’re getting a complete experience. Are all of the major modes and features present? Sometimes they aren’t. For example, Call of Duty: Black Ops III completely cut its single-player content from the Xbox 360 and PS3 versions. If you played Call of Duty for the online and always ignored single-player, this likely wouldn’t be a huge issue. If you did enjoy Call of Duty’s single-player outings, this could have been a deal-breaker, even if the game was $10 cheaper.

Four Questions To Consider When Buying Cross-Gen Games

about X hours ago from
Four Questions To Consider When Buying Cross-Gen Games

With Microsoft’s Project Scarlett and the PlayStation 5 likely to release next year, we’re set to enter another era of cross-gen games. It’s that awkward time where old consoles are pushed to their limits, and the new hotness won’t likely reach its full potential for a few years. Developers will eventually stop support for the PS4 and Xbox One, but until that happens, here are some good questions to consider before deciding if the last-gen game will do the trick, or if you’re better off waiting to play it on the new hardware.

We recognize that more advanced consoles can run more advanced games, but do your research to make sure you’re getting a complete experience. Are all of the major modes and features present? Sometimes they aren’t. For example, Call of Duty: Black Ops III completely cut its single-player content from the Xbox 360 and PS3 versions. If you played Call of Duty for the online and always ignored single-player, this likely wouldn’t be a huge issue. If you did enjoy Call of Duty’s single-player outings, this could have been a deal-breaker, even if the game was $10 cheaper.

Monster Hunter World: Iceborne Bestiary Day 3 – Elder Dragon Velkhana

about X hours ago from
Monster Hunter World: Iceborne Bestiary Day 3 – Elder Dragon Velkhana

Over the past couple of days, we’ve taken a look at Barrioth and Banbaro, two of the monsters from Monster Hunter World: Iceborne. We’re going out with a bang, with an examination of the expansion’s flagship monster, the elder dragon Velkhana.

Iceborne’s frosty new setting of Hoarfrost Reach gave the Monster Hunter team an obvious creative direction when it came time to design its flagship monster. “We wanted to make sure that the elder dragon associated with this area made sense, so naturally it went to an elder dragon with the theme of ice,” says Kaname Fujioka, the game’s executive director and art director. “One of the defining features with elder dragons in general is we feel they have a much higher affinity to the element that they’re associated with.

Fortunately, we didn’t have an elder dragon that focused on ice, so we felt that this was a natural transition to creating an elder dragon with a high affinity toward ice.” In other words, while you may have fended off some icy attacks from Legiana in Monster Hunter: World, Velkhana is an entirely different experience altogether.

Monster Hunter World: Iceborne Bestiary Day 3 – Elder Dragon Velkhana

about X hours ago from
Monster Hunter World: Iceborne Bestiary Day 3 – Elder Dragon Velkhana

Over the past couple of days, we’ve taken a look at Barrioth and Banbaro, two of the monsters from Monster Hunter World: Iceborne. We’re going out with a bang, with an examination of the expansion’s flagship monster, the elder dragon Velkhana.

Iceborne’s frosty new setting of Hoarfrost Reach gave the Monster Hunter team an obvious creative direction when it came time to design its flagship monster. “We wanted to make sure that the elder dragon associated with this area made sense, so naturally it went to an elder dragon with the theme of ice,” says Kaname Fujioka, the game’s executive director and art director. “One of the defining features with elder dragons in general is we feel they have a much higher affinity to the element that they’re associated with.

Fortunately, we didn’t have an elder dragon that focused on ice, so we felt that this was a natural transition to creating an elder dragon with a high affinity toward ice.” In other words, while you may have fended off some icy attacks from Legiana in Monster Hunter: World, Velkhana is an entirely different experience altogether.

Monster Hunter World: Iceborne Bestiary Day 2 – The Raging Grazer Banbaro

about X hours ago from
Monster Hunter World: Iceborne Bestiary Day 2 – The Raging Grazer Banbaro

You might not immediately associate the words “herbivore” with “deadly,” but don’t let a creature’s diet fool you. Try yanking on a bull’s tail and ask how the hay’s tasting to see what I mean. Actually, don’t do that. Deadly herbivores are definitely a part of Monster Hunter World: Iceborne’s ecology, as you’ll learn today in our look at the Banbaro, a massive, elk-like bruiser with boundary issues.

Banbaro is covered with thick fur, which allows it to roam freely throughout the world of Hoarfrost Reach. “It’s able to inhabit much colder areas, but it does prefer warmer areas,” says Kaname Fujioka, the game’s executive director and art director. Because it is an herbivore, it very often moves between the caverns to the forest to find food. In relation to other animals, it travels in a much wider radius. That’s bad news for hunters, since Banboro is fiercely territorial. If you get within this guy’s range, get ready for a scrap.