Test Chamber – An Early Look At Jackbox Party Pack 3's Best Games

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – An Early Look At Jackbox Party Pack 3's Best Games

Sure, there are a lot of games out there that let players express themselves. But how many let you compete with friends over the best fart joke? Next Tuesday, Jackbox Games (the creators of You Don't Know Jack) are releasing their third party game bundle entitled Jackbox Party Pack 3. Featuring four new party games and a sequel to the beloved Quiplash, Jackbox Party Pack 3 is designed for you and a group of friends to use your phone to compete in trivia or just some general absurdity. On this episode of Test Chamber, Jeff Corkj and I are joined by Jackbox Games' Arnie Niekamp and Ryan DiGiorgi to walk through some of the new games in the bundle this year.

Watch the video below to watch us compete in a deadly Trivia Murder Party, Guesspionage, and the ol' classic Quiplash.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First Three Hours

about X hours ago from
Never Played Shenmue II? Watch Us Play The First Three Hours

Last year, over the course of four months, we played through Shenmue for the Dreamcast in its entirety. It was an experimental video series, with an undefined schedule that allowed us to take in all the feedback for each episode by reading and responding to comments in (almost) real time. The experiment was a success! So we immediately decided (after playing through Dark Souls III, Tex Murphy: Under A Killing Moon, Shadow of the Colossus, and Resident Evil 4) that there was no time like the present to return to Yu Suzuki's masterpiece. For the sequel, we're playing the Xbox version that was published by Microsoft in 2002.

In the first episode we explore the city a little bit, make a friend with a fellow capsule toy collector, and get all our stuff stolen. There's also a lady who forgot to finish getting dressed who really likes her motorcycle. In episode two, we make some progress by giving a hungry guy who loves naps some money, and getting a job that's almost as cool as being a forklift driver. We punch a tree in episode three.

Stay tuned for more episodes at some point, and leave us lots of comments! We'll probably read yours on the next episode.

Five Great Games About The Great War

about X hours ago from

If EA and DICE have learned anything over the last fourteen years, it’s how to cut a great trailer. The Battlefield 1 reveal at E3 made everyone watching sit up and take notice. It’s a pulse-pounding, swashbuckling, violent montage of biplanes, horses, tanks, and soldiers in gas masks, all realized in a vibrant color palette that could hardly be further from the teal and orange that’s saturated the last two entries in the series.

But what really turned heads was the decision to set the hit military shooter in World War 1. There have been precious few games to use “The Great War” as a backdrop, and it’s not a conflict that’s very well-understood in general. Particularly since Saving Private Ryan, movie-goers and gamers alike have had boatloads of modern-day material on the Second World War to pore over and play through.

You have to dig a bit deeper to find games that help put World War 1 in context. That’s partly because it’s a difficult war to portray in a way that makes sense in games. The causes and factions involved were complex and numerous, and with the dawn of industrialized warfare came many false starts and some of the most horrible carnage humanity has ever seen. Beginning in July, 1914 and lasting to November 11, 1918, estimates put the war’s death toll at about 11 million soldiers and 7 million civilians.

Top Of The Table – Mansions Of Madness

about X hours ago from

A slithering monstrosity that defies imagination is clawing its bulbous mass up the attic stairs, even as you and your friends desperately shout out the words that might dispel the portal from which it emerged. Your fellow investigator charges down the stairs, 2x4 raised high, in a hopeless dash to slow its advance. In the corner, another companion cowers, already driven insane by the night’s horrors. The once majestic house is coming apart around you, even as you face the terrible truth of what lies within the void beyond the world. 

That’s the sort of emergent narrative that arises in a game of Mansions of Madness 2nd Edition, a dramatic reworking of an already excellent game from the folks at Fantasy Flight Games. Drawing on the themes and the Cthulhu Mythos established by H.P. Lovecraft, the original release in 2011 (designed by Corey Konieczka) established the fun potential inherent to a narrative-focused adventure game built around individual encounter scenarios and a branching, guided narrative. That first release used a one-versus-many structure, in which one player takes on the role of the “Keeper” of the mansion, while all the other players work together to try and overcome the Keeper’s machinations. 

The Classes And Character Sheets Of South Park: The Fractured But Whole

about X hours ago from

South Park: The Fractured But Whole may be a game about super heroes, but it’s still an RPG. You will still find many elements of fantasy role-playing games in its structure, and one of those elements are classes. What class you choose and how it affects your player, however, is much different from South Park: The Stick of Truth.

At the game’s opening, after you’ve customized your character, you choose between three classes: Brutalist, Blaster, and Speedster. Each of those classes has four abilities. The Brutalist is the strong class, the Blaster is the ranged class, and the Speedster is the fast class. After you make your choice, Cartman explains your backstory and you get a quick tutorial on the abilities of your chosen class. You can actually try each class out before making your final decision, which is indicative of how classes play out for the rest of the game.

The Three Major VR Headsets Are All Available – What’s The Current State Of The Platform?

about X hours ago from
The Three Major VR Headsets Are All Available – What’s The Current State Of The Platform?

Today marks the release of PlayStation VR, the final major release for this new generation of virtual reality. Kyle Hilliard and I have been playing games on that device in the past few weeks, as well as on the Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, and Samsung Gear VR. There are a lot of competing formats, which makes the idea of spending hundreds of dollars to get into VR a little scary. With that in mind, we thought it would be useful to share our experiences and opinions on the current state of virtual reality, now that the major options are now on shelves.

Jeff: Kyle, do you know what today is?

Kyle: Sammy Hagar and Sacha Baron Cohen's birthday?

Here's All Of Our PlayStation VR Coverage In One Convenient Place

about X hours ago from
Here's All Of Our PlayStation VR Coverage In One Convenient Place

PlayStation VR is out today, and it has the potential to bring virtual reality to a wider audience than its competition thanks to a comparatively cheaper price and the PlayStation 4's install base. We've been spending a lot of time with Sony's headset and we've gathered up all of our coverage into one convenient place.

The PlayStation VR ReviewThe biggest question mark for Sony's bold virtual reality vision is the hardware itself. You can find our review here where we gave a grade of C-. You can find our concluding thoughts from the review below.

PlayStation VR falls under the same argument that has plagued the ongoing war between PC gaming and console gaming for years. By the technical standards, Oculus and Vive on PC are stronger showcases for VR. However, PlayStation VR is cheaper, offers a legitimate virtual-reality experience that is more comfortable, and is easier to use than its competitors. For the console-exclusive gamers looking to enter the realm of virtual reality, PlayStation VR gets the job done. You can enter virtual worlds, get a sense that you’re really there, and have new interactive gaming experiences unlike anything you’ve seen before on consoles. You just might have a little bit of a headache as a result. - Kyle Hilliard

Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (October 13, 2016)

about X hours ago from
Blog Herding – The Best Blogs Of The Community (October 13, 2016)

Another week, another round of blogs. One game that seemed to shine this week is Virginia, which is pretty cool to see.

Community Blogs For October 6 – October 12:

I'm Too Dumb to Understand Virginia Refle's headline is provocative, but he's being honest: Virginia is pretty nutso. If I've learned anything from reading this week's blogs, it's that this game is kind of...confusing, mysterious, and just a real head scratcher. This blog has more words than Virginia has game time, but it's a good piece to help you ponder just what happened.

Test Chamber – Rez Infinite For PlayStation VR

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – Rez Infinite For PlayStation VR

Rez released 15 years ago on PlayStation 2, but despite its age, it feels like a game that was meant for virtual reality.

Rez Infinite has a new level, but is otherwise a nearly identical experience to its original release. The main difference is now you aim by looking, as opposed to moving a cursor with a control stick. VR ramps up the game's intensity, and is easier to play as a result of its updated controls.

One disadvantage of the new VR experience is its frantic speed makes it a difficult game to watch. The cursor moves much faster than it has in the past so fair warning to those hitting play – the action may be a little difficult to track.

Test Chamber – RIGS Mechanized Combat League For PlayStation VR

about X hours ago from
Test Chamber – RIGS Mechanized Combat League For PlayStation VR

RIGS Mechanized COmbat League is one of PlayStation VR's more interesting competitive multiplayer experiences.

It's a game with mechs (or rigs in this case) and guns, but it has more in common with Rocket League than something like Armored Core. In it, you compete three versus three in arenas aiming to score points in a fictional sports league that recognizes the importance and value of giant bipedal robots.

We haven't given the game its proper review yet, but we've already spent a lot of time with it. You can find some of our early impressions here.